answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2012-02-12 03:18:24

Yes, because the hitter is running to first base. If you are still there, you'll both be on a base. That means you are both out.

Both runner and batter are not out. The fielder will need to tag either 2nd base for the force out or tag both players occupying 1st. If both players are occupying 1st and both are tagged while standing on first the runner that should have gone to 2nd will be out.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions


That depends on whether a runner is forced to vacate a base when a ground ball is hit. If there is a runner on first base and a ground ball is hit, the runner is forced to run to second base because the batter is running to first base. If there is also a runner on second base, that runner is forced to run to third because the runner from first is running to second. If a runner is not forced to run, they do not have to. If there are runners on first base and third base and a ground ball is hit, the runner at first is forced to run to second because the batter is running to first. But the runner on third is not forced to run because no runner is running to third base from second base.


Actually it is possible for a runner on first not to advance on a ground ball, though it is very unlikely. If the hitter is thrown out at first base on a force play before the runner on first is thrown out, he can return to first base if at all possible.


No, when a ball is hit on the ground, the runners must try and advance to the next base.


Runner stays on second base if he is smart. That is a 5 to 3 out.


The runner isn't awarded anything. If the fielder can get the ball in time, the runner can still be thrown out at second. The runner is only awarded if the ball is thrown out of the playing field, such as the dugout or the stands. It is then declared a dead ball and is treated like a ground-rule double; The runner receives his extra base.


If the first baseman tags first base, the runner originally on first is therefore not forced to second base and he is safe at first.


There are two situations when a baseman can tag the base for an out.The first is the force out. A force out happens when a baseman tags the base of the only possible location for the runner. For example, if a batter hits a ground ball to the first baseman, the first baseman only needs to tag first base because it is the runner's only possible destination. Also, if there was a runner on first base and a ground ball was hit, there would be a force out at both second and first base because they runner on first base would be forced to progress one base. With a man on first and second base, you can force at first, second and third, and with the bases loaded, there is a force at every base. If there is a runner on second and/or third, but not first, the runners are not required to progress one base, so there is only a force at first.The second is on the fly ball. If a fly ball is caught, a base runner must touch the base again ("tag up") before moving on to the next base. If they do not tag up after the ball is caught, the baseman at the base from which they left can tag that base for the out. For example, if there is a runner on first base and the batter hits a fly ball, and that ball is caught, the runner must touch the base after the ball is caught before he can leave for the next base. If he doesn't touch the base after the ball is caught, the baseman only need tag the base while holding the ball for the out.


If the runner kicks a batted ball, the runner is out. If the ball had been touched by a fielder first, the runner is not out and can continue.


A tag play is when it is required to tag a base runner to get them out. A force play is when it is required to have possession of the ball and touch the base to get the base runner out. By definition, a force play is in effect when a base runner is 'forced' to run to the next base because of the ball being hit and another runner being 'forced' to run to the base that the runner currently occupies. If there is a runner on first base and the batter hits a ground ball to third base, the runner on first base is 'forced' to run to second base because the batter is running to first base. In this case, a force play is in effect at second base (and at first base because a batter is always 'forced' to run to first base after hitting a fair ball. A force play is always in effect at first base when a batter hits a fair ball.). If there is a runner only on second base and the batter hits a ball to first base, the runner at second is not 'forced' to run to third base because no one is 'forced' to run to second base. In this case, a tag play is in effect at third base if the runner at second attempts to advance.


No. The runner can stay on first base (if the ball is hit in the air and might be caught, for example). However, if the batter passes the runner at first, that runner is called out.


The first baseman must "have control of the ball". If his hand is on it pinning it to the ground, the call is safe. If he picks it up or in any other way, shows he/she has "control" of the ball, the call is out.



No, in that situation the person with the ball would have to tag the runner for the runner to be out.


If a baserunner is in foul ground and is hit by a batted ball, the ball is declared foul and all runners return to their previously occupied base, regardless of whether or not the runner that was hit was standing on the base.


If the ball is in foul territory and hits a base runner in foul territory then it is a foul ball, so no he would not be out


Yes. They would be out. Think of it like this. If a runner is running home from third and the catcher slides onto the plate with the ball, the runner is still out, even though the catcher is on the ground. As long as the Defensive player has possession of the ball, and is touching the base, the offensive player would be considered out.


A fly ball that is caught is an out. For a ground ball, the fielder must field the ball and then make a throw to a base or tag a runner who is off his base to try and get the out.


If the first baseman has time they should tag the runner. If the runner is already too far they should throw it. If the first baseman is close to first, they should step on first and then throw the ball to the shortstop at second. Note: Tagging first base first takes away the force out at second and the runner must then be tagged. They are also allowed to return to first base.


Depends. If the ball bounces of a defensive player, and is caught, the batter is out. If it hits a runner, the ball is dead and the runner is out but the hitter is awarded first base.


I would say yes, because if a runner is struck by a ground ball that is in foul territory, that means HE is in foul territory, and off the base paths. Hence, he would be called "out".


Any time a ball is caught by a fielder prior to the ball hitting the ground, with that catch not being the third out, any base runner can IN THEORY advance to the next base after the catch is made. However, if the fielder throws the ball to the base the runner is trying to get to, and the runner is tagged before reaching that base, that runner is also out. Thus, in a practical sense, the ball needs to be hit sufficiently far that the fielder, after catching the ball, could not throw the ball to the base, the runner would try to advance to, before the runner actually got to that base. That distance depends on how well the fielder can throw the ball and how fast the runner can get to the next base.


If the runner remains standing on the bag when the 1st baseman touches the bag and the 1st baseman does not tag the runner prior to touching the bag, then the runner is safe and you have no double play. Answer To clarify, once the Batter becomes a batter-runner, the runner at first loses his right to occupy first base and is forced to advance. If he is tagged while standing on the base, he is out. If the first baseman then steps on first base the Batter-runner is also out -- Double Play. BUT, if the first baseman first steps on the base the batter-runner is out and the force is removed. If the runner standing on first base is now tagged he is safe.


after you hit the ball, you run to first base and you are a baserunner..


if the runner is stealing no but if there was a ground ball and he is running then yes


Absolutely not -- a runner can (and invariable does) leave the base even before the pitcher throws the ball to the batter! That's called leading off. A batter can attempt to run to the next base without the batter hitting it -- ie, stealing a base. PERHAPS what you're asking about is what happens if the runner leaves the base before the ball is hit AND the batter hits the ball AND the ball is caught by a fielder before it hits the ground AND the ball is then thrown to the base where the runner was AND the ball is held there before the runner returns to that base. If ALL of those things happen, then the runner is out.



Copyright ยฉ 2021 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.