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2010-05-14 02:53:43
2010-05-14 02:53:43

No.

  • If you subtract a positive number, you move to the left.
  • If you subtract a negative number, you move to the right.
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Related Questions


to subtract a positive integer :move LEFT. The answer will get smaller


Smaller numbers always go to the left of larger number on the number line.


Subtract the remainder which is left when the digital root is divided by 9.


you subtract and the number left over is the difference


To subtract a positive number, you go the specified number of units to the left. To subtract a negative number (which is the same as adding the corresponding positive number), you go to the right.


Quite easily. Think about what the difference is between the number that you want to subtract and the number that you have. E.g I have the number 10, and I wish to subtract 6 from it: 10-6. To get from 6 to 10, I need to add 4. So in this case, when I minus 6 from 10, I'm left with 4 remaining. So, 10-6=4 Or, let's say I have 16, and I wish to take away 10. To get from 10 to 16, I need to add 6. So whan I minus 10 from 16, I am left with 6 remaining. This means that: 16-10=6 This technique works for subtracting any integer (or any decimal).


Algebraically, X = integers. X + (X + 1) = 237 gather all terms on the left 2X + 1 = 237 subtract 1 from each side 2X = 236 divide both sides integers by 2 X = 118 --------------so, X + 1 = 119 ----------------so, The two consecutive integers that = 237 are 118 and 119 -------------------


With the number line in its normal orientations, the integer on the left is smaller.


Adding IntegersTo add integers, one must consider the following two rules to be a successful.If you want to think of it on the number line you start from 0 and when you add a positive number you go that much to the right, and when you add a negative number you go that much to the left. When adding two positive integers, just add like normal. When adding one positive integer, and one negative integer, it is like subtracting a positive number from a positive number. When adding two negative integers, it is like subtracting a positive number from a negative number.


Because numbers don't stop. Think of a number (positive or negative) as a point on a number line. You can move to the right by adding to it and to the left by subtracting from it.


Yes - the idea of adding a negative number is equivalent to moving left on a number line - just as you do when you subtract a number.


It stands for Divide, Multiply, Subtract, and bring Down. This is used in long division. You divide the number on the left into the one on the right, placing your answer on top of the bracket. Then, you multiply the number on top of the bracket with the number on the left, placing this answer below the right-hand number. You subtract the number on the very bottom from the right-hand number. Then, you bring down the next numeral available underneath the bracket.


On the number line if you subtract a positive you move left. If you add a positive you move right. If add a negative you move left. If you subtract a negative you move right. That is just how I learned it. I don't know a wordy explanation.


There are a few key methods to add and subtract integers. The first is easy to use but takes more time and thought (less automatic with practice). It is the number line method. Imagine (or draw!) a number line with 0 at the middle and negative numbers extending to the left. Now when you add a number, go to the left if it is negative and the right if it is positive to arrive at the answer. When subtracting do the opposite (as the subtraction sign negates the value of the number). For example, 3 - (-4) can be thought of as follows. Begin at positive 3. Now move 4 to the right (minus a negative is to the right). We end up at positive 7, the answer.Another method is to change all subtraction problems to addition problems and learn to add any combination of integers (two positive, two negatives, one of each, and with 0). Generally:a - b = a + (-b).For examples:3 - (-4) = 3 + -(-4) = 3 + 4 = 7.-2 - 3 = -2 + (-3) = -5.2 - 1 = 2 + (-1) = 1.Note that the sum of two positive numbers is the sum of their absolute values. The sum of two negative numbers is the inverse of the sum of their absolute values. In other words, two positives become more positive and two negatives become more negative. Further, adding 0 does nothing to the number (additive identity).Finally, when confronted with both a positive and negative number, whichever has the larger absolute value will be the sign of the result. Then take the difference in absolute values and apply that sign to the result.---------------------My improvement is here:The above is right, and it's for subracting signed (positive +, and negative - )integers. Some people might not know much about signed integers, so I try to give some improvement on just basic/plain integers.Basically in order to subtract, you need to know how to add to see if you have done it right.Now consider I have a basket of many apples. I could take some, say 5 out of the basket, hence I have subtracted 5 apples from the basket. I may or may not even know how many apples are left. In order to know how many are left I would need to initially know how many were in the basket to start with. If there were 8 apples in the basket to start with and I took a group of 5 out, then I have a group of 3 apples left in the basket because 8 - 5 = 3 since the basket originally contained the two groups of: 5 apples and 3 apples combined together, mathematically this is noted with addition: 5 + 3 = 8. We see that if you subtract one group (either the group of 5 or the group of 3) from 8, you will have the other group left.How do you subtract intergers?subtracting integers with tilesto add integers, we combine group of tilesto subtract integers, we do the reverse:we TAKE AWAY TILES FROM A GROUPrecall the equal numbers of red and yellow tiles model 0for example:,(-5)+(+5)=0adding 0 to the pair doesnt change its value.for example:,(-3)+0=-3to use tiles to subtract integers, we model the first integer, then take away thenumber of tiles indicated by the second integer.we can use tiles to subtract (+5)-(+9)=answer: -4by:Izabela torbinski


If you subtract five from ten you are left with five.You can subtract the sugar and add honey for this recipe if you prefer.


You take the atomic mass (the small number in the upper left corner of the square in the periodic table) and subtract the atomic number from it (the big bold number on the periodic table)


If you place the numbers on the number line, they go from the least to the greatest as you go from left to right.


A negative, since subtracting a positive is equivalent to moving left done the number line. Since we start left of 0 on the number line, it is only possible to end left of it after subtraction, resulting in a negative. Since the subtraction is the opposite of addition, to subtract a positive really means that you are adding a negative. So you are adding two negatives which gives you a negative sum.


The answer to this question changes daily. There are 365 days in a year. In a leap year there are 366 days. Subtract today's number day from that number and you will have your answer. See related links for a "number of days left in the year" calculator to input today's date.


It is the remainder that is sometimes left over but not always.


Subtract = takeaway, find the difference, how many are left? less than


The phrase "how many left" would arise in a subtraction problem. You start with a certain number, then you subtract something from that number, and you want to know how many are left. It might be a real world type problem. I have $10. I spend $4 on a hamburger. I then have $6 left.


The number of protons that an atom has is the same as the atomic number of the element. It is also the same as the number of electrons if the atom is neutral. If you are given the mass number of the atom, then subtract the number of neutrons and you will be left with protons.


Integers include positive whole numbers, negative whole numbers, and zero.The "set of all integers" is often shown like this:Integers = {… -5, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, …} The dots at each end of the set mean that you can keep counting in either direction. The set can also be shown as a number line:The arrows on each end of the number line mean that you can keep counting in either direction.Adding and Subtracting IntegersLooking at a number line can help you when you need to add or subtract integers.Whether you are adding or subtracting two integers, start by using the number line to find the first number. Put your finger on it. Let's say the first number is 3.Then, if you are adding a positive number,move your finger to the right as many places as the value of that number. For example, if you are adding 4, move your finger 4 places to the right. 3 + 4 = 7If you are adding a negative number, move your finger to the left as many places as the value of that number. For example, if you are adding -4, move your finger 4 places to the left. 3 + -4 = -1If you are subtracting a positive number, move your finger to the left as many places as the value of that number. For example, if you are subtracting 4, move your finger 4 places to the left. 3 - 4 = -1If you are subtracting a negative number, move your finger to the right as many places as the value of that number. For example, if you are subtracting -4, move your finger 4 places to the right. 3 - -4 = 7Here are two rules to remember:Adding a negative number is just like subtracting a positive number. 3 + -4 = 3 - 4Subtracting a negative number is just like adding a positive number. The two negatives cancel out each other. 3 + 4 = 3 - -4


You have to make make 24 with the 3 numbers they gave you. Once you Add, Subtract, Multiply, or Divide, you click the answer of the problem's answer and you Add, Subtract, Multiply, and Divide by the number you have left.



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