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Answered 2006-07-13 10:15:36

Iver Johnsons can be hard to identify. Would need to know if it has the tip-up frame or a solid frame, what the patent dates are and where the patent dates are located. sales@countrygunsmith.net

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My iver johnson has the serial # on the trigger guard


They can be made from spring stock by most gunsmiths. The original parts for these very old guns are about used up.


Luckily, Iver Johnson made mostly 8-shot revolvers. The 'Supershot 9' was made from 1929 - 1949, so figuring yours at the early range of that is reasonable. sales@countrygunsmith.net



Yes Iver Johnson made a 38 caliber revolver. I have one that my older brother (age 94) gave me which I think was my Mothers weapon. I just got it back from a gunsmith friend of mine and he took it apart and cleaned and checked it out and said it is ready to fire. He told me to be sure and specify 38 S&W ammunition for it. The only number I could find (36210) is on the bottom of the trigger guard which I assume is the serial # Carl W. Southerland Bossier City, LA Ret. USAF


Impossible to answer without a detailed description of all markings, caliber, finish, condition, box, accessories, etc..


It's your control of your trigger finger. There is no safety device on a Rohm revolver.


Manufactured by Iver Johnson and sold by J.P. Lovell Arms. The Defender were made from 1875 to 1888 and the Defender from 1889 to 1895. .22 short r.f. caliber, 7 shot single action Defender no 1 revolver, spur trigger, solid frame, 2 1/4" round barrel, fluted cylinder, birdhead grips, walnut or checkered black rubber, nickeled, marked DEFENDER .32 short r.f. caliber, 5 shot single action Defender no 2 revolver, spur trigger, solid frame, 2 1/2" round or octagonal barrel, fluted cylinder, birdhead grips, walnut or checkered black rubber, nickeled, marked DEFENDER .38 short r.f. caliber, 5 shot single action Defender no 3 revolver, spur trigger, solid frame, as above .41 short r.f. caliber, 5 shot single action Defender no 4 revolver, spur trigger, solid frame, as above In 1882 they were sold at Defender no 1 = $1.50 Defender no 2 = $2.85 Defender no 3 = $4.10 Defender no 4 = $5.60 .22 r.f. caliber, 7 shot single action revolver, spur trigger, solid frame, 2 1/8" to 2 1/2" round or octagonal barrel, fluted cylinder, birdhead or square butt checkered black rubber grips, nickeled, blued or case hardened on in combination of that, marked DEFENDER 89 (improvement introduced in 1889) .32 r.f. caliber, 5 shot single action revolver, spur trigger, solid frame, 2 1/8" to 2 1/2" octagonal barrel, fluted cylinder, saw-handle square butt checkered black rubber grips, nickeled, marked DEFENDER 89 (improvement introduced in 1889)


If your revolver is an Iver Johnson Viking, it is a top break revolver. Holding the revolver in your right hand (finger OFF the trigger) use thumb and forefinger of left hand to grasp barrel latch (between back of cylinder and hammer) lift the latch, and revolver breaks open. If this does not work, take it to a gunsmith.


depends on the model revolver. single action just in front of trigger guard............ modern revolver bottom of butt............


By pulling the trigger... :P


I believe along the top of the barrel. serial # might be in front of trigger guard, depending on type pf revolver......................


A consistent 6.5 pound double-action only trigger pull.


Firearms International was an importer, now out of business I believe. It is unlikely that they would have actually marked the gun with their name before these markings were required in 1968. There are probably other markings that may identify the actual manufacturer. Double Action refers to a revolver mechanism and I have no idea what you mean by a doubleaction trigger on a rifle.


It will depend on the caliber, the trigger and the type of semi-auto action.


so it won't dischage if you force it into a pocket..............it's like a safety.


No serial number provided; no way to answer.



Early revolvers were single action- you had to cock the hammer manually, then pull the trigger. An example would be the Colt Peacemaker. A double action revolver (such as a S&W 357 magnum- Mdl 66) can be fired by pulling the trigger. Trigger pull, by itself, will cause the hammer to rise and fall. OR- the hammer may be cocked, and then the trigger pulled. A "DAO" or double action only, the hammer cannot be cocked, and the gun must be fired by pulling the trigger.



This is a .22 caliber, six shot, revolver. It is 'single-action', meaning that you have to cock the hammer back before each shot (the trigger only releases the hammer - a single action). Well made, accurate, perfect for target or varmint.


Depends on the revolver. Some are double action- pulling the trigger makes the hammer rise and fall, firing the revolver- so it will fire as fast as you can pull the trigger- but usually at the cost of accuracy. Older style revolvers were usually single action- the hammer had to be manually cocked, and then the trigger pulled. One fast fire technique was known as "fanning" The trigger would he held down with fingers of one hand, and the other hand was rapidly brushed over the hammer, cocking it, and causing it to fire as soon as it was cocked. Accuracy was horrible.


Do you mean the cylinder on a revolver? If the cylinder on a revolver doesn't turn when you pull the trigger, then there is something wrong with the action, probably a part broken.


The serial number is located on the left side of the frame behind the trigger. If you simply do an internet search for 'Iver Johnson TP22' you will bring up multiple pages with pictures of that model. sales@countrygunsmith.net


The exact value of a Browning 22 caliber pistol with gold trigger is actually dependent upon a number of factors. Some of these factors would include the gold content, year and condition of the pistol.



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