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Where does electricity come from?

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2015-09-09 02:45:17
2015-09-09 02:45:17

Electricity comes from many sources. Such as coal power plants, nuclear power plants and renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and hydroelectric dams.

There is a great EPA calculator to help you know which sources your electricity comes from and how clean they are:

If you live in Minneapolis, the four biggest sources of power are:

Nuclear: Mostly from the Monticello and Prairie Island Nuclear Reactors.

Coal: From the Big Lake Coal-fired Plant.

Wind: From the 11 Suburbs and farms to the West and South of the Metro.

Natural Gas: From the Calpine Natural Gas plant in Mankato.

These resources generally are consolidated into regional electric companies, which sell you the power they generate for a monthly bill, which you pay, so that the plant can buy more of its fuel source to make more power for you or maintain the machinery that generates the power, like the steam or wind-driven turbines.

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Electricity is generated by moving electrons through a media. A magnetic flux is required to generate this electricity. A magnetic field hits a medium i.e. gas or conductor. The electrons of this media will move on a close circuit. This movement is called current. A lightning is one sample of flux tru gas media. All those mentioned above on the first answer uses this magnetic flux.

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