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Answered 2009-10-20 19:40:26

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That quote is a romanticized myth arising from the ruling in Worcester v. Georgia, 31 US 515 (1832), in which the Supreme Court, under the leadership of John Marshall, declared Native Americans had a right to federal protection against enforcement of unconstitutional state laws.

President Jackson never said, "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it!" In Paul Boller's book, They Never Said It: A Book of False Quotes, Misquotes, & False Attributions, historian Robert V. Remini explains Jackson wrote in a letter to John Coffee, "...the decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate," meaning the Court's opinion was moot because it had no power to enforce its edict (not being a legislative body).

In fact, Georgia did obey the Supreme Court's only substantive ruling, which ordered the release from jail of missionaries who had lived on Native American land without buying a required state license. Since Georgia complied, there was nothing to enforce.

President Jackson and Congress opposed the Court's developing support of Native American rights, which they later demonstrated by seizing Native American land and displacing its inhabitants in the "Trail of Tears" tragedy.

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Answered 2020-10-11 14:14:01

Andrew Jackson

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Nothing but the President can choose not to enforce it. (The decision)


"John Marshall has made his decision;now let him enforce it."


Jacksons response: "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it."


The willingness of the government and the Exutive Branch to enforce that decision.


The US Supreme Court lacks the ability to enforce its own decisions, which is a check on the Judicial Branch of government. The Executive Branch is vested with the authority and obligation to enforce Supreme Court decisions, and the Legislative branch can support a decision by passing laws upholding the Court's finding.


Andrew Jackson never said those words.The quote is a romanticized myth arising from the ruling in Worcester v. Georgia, 31 US 515 (1832), in which the Supreme Court, under the leadership of John Marshall, declared Native Americans had a right to federal protection against enforcement of unconstitutional state laws.President Jackson never said, "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it!" In Paul Boller's book, They Never Said It: A Book of False Quotes, Misquotes, & False Attributions, historian Robert V. Remini explains Jackson wrote in a letter to John Coffee, "...the decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate," meaning the Court's opinion was moot because it had no power to enforce its edict (not being a legislative body).In fact, Georgia did obey the Supreme Court's only substantive ruling, which ordered the release from jail of missionaries who had lived on Native American land without buying a required state license. Since Georgia complied, there was nothing to enforce.President Jackson and Congress opposed the Court's developing support of Native American rights, which they later demonstrated by seizing Native American land and displacing its inhabitants in the "Trail of Tears" tragedy.==================================================sumarized: Andrew Jackson's infamous quote about John Marshall was in reaction to the Supreme Court's decision in Worcester v. Georgia. In this 1832 case, John Marshall and the Supreme Court ruled that Georgia could not impose its laws on Cherokee triballands.


According to popular myth, Jackson was supposed to have said, "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it!" In Paul Boller's book, They Never Said It: A Book of False Quotes, Misquotes, & False Attributions, historian Robert V. Remini claims Jackson never made such a statement. The tale is based on something Jackson wrote in a letter to John Coffee, "...the decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate,"meaning the Court's opinion was moot because it had no power to enforce its edict (not being a legislative body).


Supreme Court decisions can only be overridden in two ways:The US Supreme Court reverses a decision on an earlier case by making a contradictory decision on a current case.Congress and the States override a decision by amending the Constitution.There are several legitimate and illegitimate methods Congress and the President use to resist Supreme Court decisions that may have the practical effect of overriding a decision, however.Sometimes the Executive Branch obstructs or fails to enforce a decision.Sometimes Congress rewrites legislation to bring it into compliance with constitutional guidelines.Sometimes Congress strips the Supreme Court of its appellate jurisdiction over certain types of cases to deprive them of the ability to overturn a law or policy.


He likely was referring to the supreme court decision that required racial integration of public schools. He ordered the national guard to enforce integration at Little Rock high school.



He federalized the Arkansas National Guard and sent it packing. He then brought in the 101st Airborne Division with orders to integrate Central High School.



President Andrew Jackson was the official who approved of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. There were five major tribes: the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole. The Cherokee challenged the Indian Removal Act in the courts of the United States. It made its way up to the Supreme Court where it went under the supervision of John Marshall. He ruled the favor to the Cherokee. Note the Supreme Court could make the ruling but cannot enforce it, only the executive branch (the president) has the power to do so. The president at that time, Andrew Jackson ignored the decision of the Supreme Court and stilled removed the Indians from their land.


"Justice Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it" <-- Trail of Tears Certainly not, by any of the generally accepted meaning of that word,


enforce laws declare war make treaties pick members of the supreme court


The Supreme Court is the head of the judicial branch of the government and has the responsibility to enforce the Constitution. If legislation is found to be unconstitutional then it is overturned.


"the court has made its decision, now let them try to enforce it". This may not answer the question fully, but as the court has no way to enforce its decisions, it depends on the President to enforce it for them. I recall school issue of segregation in the south when Eisenhouer sent federal troops to ensure the blacks entered white schools. If he had not, the courts order would not have been enforced by the states in that region. Recently, a federal judge ruled on "dont ask dont tell". If the President didnt agree with the courts ruling, and neither did the military. who would enforce the courts order?


what did kennedy do to enforce the marshall plan


President Eisenhower did not agree with the decision of the Supreme Court in Brown vs Board of Education that educational institutions in the South were unequal and segregation hurt students who did not get an "equal" education. He felt the decision was a mistake. But, as President he was sworn to uphold the law and enforce the law. Eisenhower was a constitutionalist and to him, the Court's ruling had the force of law. Governor Faubus of Arkansas was defying the Court's order so Eisenhower took over command of the National Guard and ordered troops to enforce the integration of Central High School.


Andrew Jackson was against nullification, as long as it served his own purposes. Jackson became infamous for nullifying the Supreme Court decision in favor of the Cherokee nation. He is noted for saying something to the effect, "Let the Supreme Court enforce their decision."


the job is not to enforce the laws but to make them.


The Cherokee went to the supreme court and won but Andrew Jackson didn't listen to the ruling because john Marshall couldn't enforce the ruling.


If a law is passed that is unjust or against the constitution it will end up in the Supreme Court. The president doesn't enforce it. He doesn't have that kind of power.


There is a checks and balance system for a reason. A President cannot go against the Supreme Court's decisions, if not simply because the Supreme Court decides what is Constitutional and what is not. As a President, they cannot go against that. Every President, from George Washington to Barrack Obama, took an oath to uphold the Constitution. A President can be impeached for acting against the Constitution. In reality, both the President and Congress sometimes delay acting or fail to fully enforce a Supreme Court decision. This was most notable during the civil rights movement with regard to desegregation, especially before Congress passed the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1968.


According to popular myth, Jackson was supposed to have said, "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it!" In Paul Boller's book, They Never Said It: A Book of False Quotes, Misquotes, & False Attributions, historian Robert V. Remini claims Jackson never made such a statement. The tale is based on something Jackson wrote in a letter to John Coffee, "...the decision of the Supreme Court has fell still born, and they find that they cannot coerce Georgia to yield to its mandate,"meaning the Court's opinion was moot because it had no power to enforce its edict (not being a legislative body).Case citation:Worcester v. Georgia, 31 US 515 (1832)For more information, see Related Questions, below.



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