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Contract Law

Which one of the following situations is least likely to lead to a breach of the contract?

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If you check your contract, it most likely says that the trip can be changed by the company without notice.

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If you have a signed agreement, you can hire an attorney and sue the employer for breach of contract. However, if you do so, you will likely need to seek other employment.

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An increase in production costs results from a rise in wages.

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It's not really a legalality issue unless there is a breach of contract. They can decide, betrween them, on whatever arrangement they want. It's more likely a contract issue with regard to the relationship of the booth renter and the owner and how they have that relationship set up. If the booth renter doesn't want to take gift certificates, write it in the contract. If the owner makes them do it anyway, it's a breach of contract. If the owner refuses to write the contract accordingly, the booth renter has the option not to work there.

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Not in California. * In most instances the contract is binding when money has "changed hands". If this were not so, car dealers would have serious financial and inventory problems, as most vehicles that are bought have a waiting period for delivery. Therefore, a lawsuit will likely stand up in court if the dealer chooses to pursue damages for breach of contract on the part of the buyer.

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A group of organisms is isolated from the main population on three isolated islands with different environmental conditons.

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Breaking a "no-compete" provision of a contract will subject the person breaking it to a lawsuit for damages under both a breach of contract action and the tort of interference with business opportunity action. Those damages would be reimbursement to the other party for all income it lost because of the violation of the no compete clause. Many no-compete contract provisions will also state other types of damages that could be recovered, such as forfeiting all income earned and paying attorneys' fees. There might also be punitive damages. Punitive damages are not a usual remedy for breach of contract cases, but they are a remedy for intentional torts as interference with a business opportunity most likely is.

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A formal contract is written and signed; an informal contract is more likely to be in the form of a verbal agreement.

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First, if the "contract" is in fact a contract, it is, by definition, binding. If it is not binding, then it cannot be a contract.Now, as to whether you can "cancel" a contract.If all parties to a contract agree, the contract can be avoided. You can simply come together and decide not to go forward with it anymore. However, in theory, you make a new contract when you alter the terms of an existing contract. Therefore, you want to make sure the new contract is given for consideration. For example, let's assume you have agreed to pay a guy $100,000 a year to keep your house perfectly spotless for the next twelve years. Times changed, and you don't have the money. It will cost him something to sue you for it, and instead of pursuing the issue, he could just take on a new client on his waiting list (he's that good). The sensible thing to do is to just agree to move on, and sometimes people actually do so. However, you'd want to pay him something to let out of the deal. You could pay with anything (wash his car, give him $10, promise not to hire another cleaning service for a period of time, whatever).If one party to the contract fails to perform, the other party may declare a breach and stop performing. Let's go back to the house cleaning deal. But this time, instead of you running out of money, let's say the cleaner sucks. The contract provided for a "perfectly spotless" house, and let's also say it provided that you, and you alone, got to determine what constitutes perfectly spotless. You determine that the service rendered is nowhere close to perfectly spotless. So, you inform the cleaner that he is in breach of the contract and that you won't be paying him anymore. Assuming these facts, you're in the right, but you're also going to have defend yourself when he sues you for payment.Further, you may, at any time, breach a contract on purpose. Doing so does not relieve you of your obligations under the contract, but there are situations where you are (economically) better off not performing and paying the consequences. See, for example, the current trend of people simply stopping their mortgage payments because their house's value has plummeted. Most folks would consider this stealing, but it is an option.Some corrections to the way the answer previously stood:You have answered the question in your question. If it is binding, you cannot cancel it. There are lots of way to make a contract not binding. [no there aren't. in fact, there are exactly zero ways to make a contract not binding. if it isn't binding, it isn't a contract.] If the contract has a cancellation clause. [this doesn't make a contract not binding. it merely provides a means to shorten the term (more precisely, it provides a means to not lengthen the term).] If there was a breach by the other party. [a breach doesn't "cancel" the contract. if it did, you would have no recourse. a breach give you a cause of action action against the breaching party.] However with breach, you sometimes are required to keep performing or you will be on the hook. The most effective way, I have found, is to contact the person your contract is with and explain the situation. If you have a valid reason to cancel the contract and the other party would not be unjustly injured by you doing so, they will most likely agree to abolish the contract. [just make sure you pay something for the alterations.] Business relationships are like any other, communication is vital. Communicate with your service provider and explain to them your grievances. If your grievance is that you can no longer afford the service, that might not be enough, absent some extenuating circumstance that caused your inability to pay. If your problem is with the service being provided, communicate this with them. Request an adequate assurance that they will fulfill their end of the bargain. Do this by asking them to agree to some additional terms. [bad idea. do this by sending a letter (yes, on paper, in the mail, with confirmation of delivery if you smell a lawsuit coming) stating that they are in breach of the contract, and that, as a courtesy, you are giving a certain period of time for the breach to be cured. further, you should clearly state that, by extending this courtesy, you are not waiving any of your rights under the contract, and that you retain the right to bring an action for breach at any time.] Provide specifics in this new agreement. When they do not meet these new specific terms (and you have stated the right to cancel in the new agreement), you may cancel the contract. [no you can't. you can declare a breach, inform the other party that you want them to cure the breach, and if they don't, you sue. further, you inform them that, in light of their breach, you are suspending your performance until the situation is resolved. you never "cancel" the contract. it remains in force at all times.]The problem is that when you are dealing with large businesses, they often have little room for negotiation and once you have entered into a contract with them, you are bound.The more specific your question, the more specific the answer will be on this forum.

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No, that would be pretty unlikely. You can have no idea how seriously they take that.

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There are two words with different spellings:breaches - plural of breach (an opening or gap) or the present tense of to breachbreeches - trousers (or specifically horse-riding pants); also rears/ loading areas of guns (likely this was originally a reference to the other breach)

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Yes, you can cancel a contract with you service provider, but you will most likely be charged with an early termination fee. And this will depend on the stipulations on the contract.

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Yes it is possibly to break the contract however you will most likely have to pay a penalty fee for breaking the contract.

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The statute rules. It does so because the statute was created by the legislature, most likely to overturn the standing common law.

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In general, no. Only the District or Crown attorneys have the power to press criminal charges. A citizen can sue for civil liability. In the case of a breach of contract, you would most likely go to small claims court and get money.

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You are not likely to contract HIV from someone urinating on you.

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READ you contract. Likely not on a 1st payment default.

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You can get HIV whether your partner is circumcised or not.

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He renewed his contract, so it is not likely.

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It depends on the situation. You first have to consider the consequences. If it were a minor infraction, and the likely result wouldn't be productive or position, then I might not. Otherwise, yes, I would definitely report a breach of standards. Just be prepared to defend your claim.

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Generally: First, failure to carry homeowner's insurance is likely a breach of the mortgage. If the lender discovers your property is uninsured it can call in the full amount of the loan immediately. If you can't pay it, the lender may be able to take possession of the property by foreclosure. Second, if your house burns down you will not have coverage for the damage and will still owe the full amount of the mortgage. The lender may also sue for breach of contract and place you deeper in debt.

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They are most likely independent as they have decided to stray away from the rest of the question and not appear.

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Yes, you can. But it will be very difficult since it is a contract. Most likely you will be forced to pay the termination bill which is very expensive.


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