answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2017-12-02 03:56:05

Every time you flip a coin it has a 50% chance of heads and a 50% chance of tails. Flipping a coin multiple times does not change that. Therefore the answer is 50%

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions


Theoretical is 50% Heads, 50% tails: 30-Heads, 30-Tails (theoretical)


Take for example, flipping a coin. Theoretically, if I flip it, there is a 50% chance that I flip a head and a a 50% chance that I flip a tail. That would lead us to believe that out of 100 flips, there should theoretically be 50 heads and 50 tails. But if you actually try this out, this may not be the case. What you actually get, say 46 heads and 54 tails, is the experimental probability. Thus, experimental probability differs from theoretical probability by the actual results. Where theoretical probability cannot change, experimental probability can.


probability of rolling a 3 = 1/6 probability of flipping a head = 1/2 therefore, overall = 1/12


Anyone can flip a coin four times so I say 100 percent probability. On the other maybe you should ask the odds of the results from four flips.


The probability of rolling a 2 on a die before flipping a heads on a coin is 1 in 12. The probability of rolling a 2 is 1 in 6. The probability of flipping heads is 1 in 2. Since these are sequentially unrelated events, you simply multiply the probabilities together.


The probability of flipping Heads on a coin is 1 - a certainty - if the coin is flipped often enough. On a single toss of a fair coin the probability is 1/2.


The probability of flipping a quarter and getting heads is 1 in 2. the probability of rolling a die and getting 6 is 1 in 6.



Experimental probability is calculated by taking the data produced from a performed experiment and calculating probability from that data. An example would be flipping a coin. The theoretical probability of landing on heads is 50%, .5 or 1/2, as is the theoretical probability of landing on tails. If during an experiment, however, a coin is flipped 100 times and lands on heads 60 times and tails 40 times, the experimental probability for this experiment for landing on heads is 60%, .6 or 6/10. The experimental probability of landing on tails would be 40%, .4, or 6/10.


The probability of flipping three tails with three coins is (1 in 2)3 or 1 in 8 or 0.125.



If they are fair coins, the probability is 0.25


The probability of flipping a coin 3 times and getting 3 heads is 1/2



The best way to think about this is the following way: What is the probability of flipping heads once? 1/2 What is the probability of flipping heads twice? 1/4 (1/2 * 1/2) Using this we can derive the equation to find the probability of flipping heads any number of times. 1/2n Using this we plug in 25 for n and get 1/225 or as a decimal 2.98023224 x 10-8 or as odds 1:33,554,432


The probability is 3/8.The probability is 3/8.The probability is 3/8.The probability is 3/8.




The probability is 1. I have flipped a coin a lot more than 7 times.


The probability of flipping tails on a perfect coin in a perfect toss is 0.5. The probability of rolling 1 on a die is 1 in 6. Likewise, the probability of rolling 6 on a die is 1 in 6. So the probability of rolling either 1 or 6 is 2 in 6 (which is 1 in 3).




The answer depends on how many coins are flipped, and how often.


The probability of flipping three heads when flipping three coins is 1 in 8, or 0.125. It does not matter if the coins are flipped sequentially or simultaneously, because they are independent events.


50/50 50/50? This is equal to 1 which would imply the probability of flipping a head is certain. Obviously not correct as the probability of flipping a head in a fair dice is 1/2 or 0.5



Copyright ยฉ 2021 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.