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Who invented the drinking straw?

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2010-01-03 10:12:22
2010-01-03 10:12:22

The modern drinking straw was patented in 1888 by Marvin C. Stone.

However, the straw is believed to go back to the Sumerians of ancient Mesopotamia, who used natural materials to form cylindrical drinking funnels so they could drink beer - doing to through a straw helped them avoid the sediments left over from the fermentation process.

Straws used for drinking liquids were made from rye-grass, and tended to give drinks a grassy flavour, so weren't very popular, even though they were practical.

The modern drinking straw was actually patented on 3 December 1888 by Marvin Chester Stone who was employed at a paper cigarette holder factory in Washington DC. He used a fine piece of paper from the cigarette holder factory, rolled it around a pencil then coated it in wax to prevent it becoming waterlogged.

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The drinking straw as we know it today was invented in 1888 by Marvin Stone.

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the chinese invented the straw made of bamboo

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Marvin C. Stone in 1888

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It was a man named Joseph Friedman, who patented the flexible drinking straw in 1937.

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Arthur Aykanian of Massachusetts was the inventor of the first flexible plastic straw. He later invented the spoon straw for use with the Slurpee.

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Marvin Chester Stone invented the drinking straw because he didn't like the earlier invention of drinking straws by the Sumerians of Mesopotamia where they used dry, hollow, rye-grass as drinking straw's. He believed it made beverages taste like grass.

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The modern drinking straw was patented on 3 December 1888 by Marvin Chester Stone who was employed at a paper cigarette holder factory in Washington DC. He invented the drinking straw by using a fine piece of paper from the cigarette holder factory, rolled it around a pencil then coated it in wax to prevent it becoming waterlogged.

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No, not a drinking straw. As for straw as in grass, I guess someone could eat that.

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No it doesn't drinking it is exactly the same

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The pH of the water lowers as you blow bubbles into it through a drinking straw.

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The collective nouns for straw (plant fiber) are a clutchof straw, a bundle of straw, a truss of straw.The collective noun for straws (drinking) is a bundle of straws.

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Type your answer here... Yes

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Scarletino a french man who wanted to make drinking easier since he always got drunk at bars cause he got divorced at the time.

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It depends on the diameter of the straw, which varies. Multiply the diameter by 3.14 and the result by the length of the straw.

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When sucking the straw, we force the state of vacuum and atmospheric force act on liquid surface pushing the liquid up the straw.

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No, but I am able to do that while drinking tea out of a pineapple shaped straw... i dont know if this helps but i hope so!!

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No logic suggest that drinking through a straw will intoxicate you quicker. In fact, when drinking through a straw, we typically tend to take smaller sips of the liquid than we would if we just sipped it naturally.

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Normally it doesnt matter, however if you are drinking anything acidic, then i would suggest using a straw

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I personally think you drink more when using a straw. I drink twice as much with a straw than tipping the cup.

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Proboscis ... it is like a drinking straw.

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Not unless he's drinking with a straw.

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Arthur A. Aykanian (b.1923), of Massachusetts, invented the first plastic bendable straw, the so-called "bendy straw." He had a patent on the first stay-bent plastic straw, as well. He was the inventor of the spoon straw, originally used for the 7-11 Slurpee.

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the Egyptians invented them out of straw and twine and tar


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