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Who were Marquette and Jolliet?

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2011-02-20 15:49:17
2011-02-20 15:49:17

French explorers who led the first French expedition down the Mississippi River.

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He died when he became ill in 1674 on his journey with Jolliet down the Mississippi riven. He and Jolliet went back up the Mississippi river but in the way, Marquette sadly died.

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the discovered the Mississippi river and Jacques Marquette they discovered gold and silver.

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they found the Mississippi river for there country

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to find a better future on their quingdom

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If your question is what country did they do it for, it is France.

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Jacques Marquette, together with Louis Jolliet, claimed the northern portion of the Mississippi River for France.

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no, Louis Jolliet and Jaques Marquette did.

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No. They sailed under an english flag.

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Louis Jolliet along with the Jesuit Father Jacques Marquette were the first Europeans to explore and map much of the Mississippi River in 1673.

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Because they were the first Europeans to map the rivers of the southeast and west of Asia

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JACQUES MARQUETTE (1637-1675) LOUIS JOLLIET(sometimes spelled Joliet) (1645-1700) Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet searched together and found the waters of the Mississippi River. They were the first Europeans to follow the course of the river. Jacques Marquette (also known as Father Marquette) was a Catholic missionary and explorer. He was born in Laon, France. In 1666 came to Qu�bec, Canada and learned Indian languages. From 1669 to 1671 he worked in missions in Sault Sainte Marie (Michigan) and La Pointe (Wisconsin). Around this time, he first met Louis Jolliet, who was trading with Indians in the same area. Jolliet was a French-Canadian trader and explorer. Jolliet was born near Qu�bec City and raised in a Jesuit seminary. In 1668 he decided that he didn't want to become a priest and he became a trader with the Indians instead. From 1669 to 1671 Jolliet explored a lot of the Great Lakes region. During that time he became a great map maker, also worked as a fur trader, and met Marquette. In 1672, Jolliet was named leader of an expedition that would explore the northern part of the Mississippi River the following year. Jolliet asked Father Marquette to be the chaplain of this group. Along with five others, Jolliet and Marquette crossed Lake Michigan, and explored the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers, before reaching the Mississippi River. They followed the Mississippi southward past the mouth of the Arkansas River, then returned northward. After the expedition, Marquette stayed by Lake Michigan and Jolliet returned to Qu�bec. Father Marquette preached among the Illinois Indians until his death in 1675. On his way back to Qu�bec, when Jolliet was on Lake Michigan, his canoe turned over and all his precious maps and journals of his trips were lost, but he was able to replace most of the information from memory. Later, he explored other parts of Canada, such as Labrador and Hudson Bay. Louis Jolliet died in 1700 at the age of 55.

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they were people To be more specific.. they were to my understanding... |Marquette, Jolliet, & Cartier... :) They were....indeed .....People!|

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Jacques Marquette was born in Laon, France while Louis Jolliet was born in Quebec before September 21, 1645

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Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette were some of the first Europeans to explore Illinois.

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the first europeans explorers named Father jaques Marquette and Louis JOlliet! in 1673

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You can ask yourself whether you actually are set on you finding for the country

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The priest who explored the upper Mississsippi was Jacques Marquette (also known as Father Marquette); see entire page at the link below..from the website Explorers of the Millennium:Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet searched together and found the waters of the Mississippi River. They were the first Europeans to follow the course of the river.Jacques Marquette (also known as Father Marquette) was a Catholic missionary and explorer. He was born in Laon, France. In 1666 came to Québec, Canada and learned Indian languages. From 1669 to 1671 he worked in missions in Sault Sainte Marie (Michigan) and La Pointe (Wisconsin). Around this time, he first met Louis Jolliet, who was trading with Indians in the same area.Jolliet was a French-Canadian trader and explorer. Jolliet was born near Québec City and raised in a Jesuit seminary. In 1668 he decided that he didn't want to become a priest and he became a trader with the Indians instead. From 1669 to 1671 Jolliet explored a lot of the Great Lakes region. During that time he became a great map maker, also worked as a fur trader, and met Marquette.In 1672, Jolliet was named leader of an expedition that would explore the northern part of the Mississippi River the following year. Jolliet asked Father Marquette to be the chaplain of this group. Along with five others, Jolliet and Marquette crossed Lake Michigan, and explored the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers, before reaching the Mississippi River. They followed the Mississippi southward past the mouth of the Arkansas River, then returned northward.After the expedition, Marquette stayed by Lake Michigan and Jolliet returned to Québec. Father Marquette preached among the Illinois Indians until his death in 1675.

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Marquette and Jolliet knew that the Mississippi River could not be the Northwest Passage because the Mississippi River continued to flow South.

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because when they reached Arkansas river, the mississppi river flowed south

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The first recorded Americans in Illinois were Louis Jolliet and Father Marquette in 1673. In1763 the state was given to England by the French.


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