Math and Arithmetic

Why are areas and perimeter not dependent on one another?

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2016-11-01 18:30:59
2016-11-01 18:30:59

That's because you can easily have two different shapes with the SAME perimeter, and DIFFERENT areas, or vice versa. Here is an example:* A 2x2 rectangle has an area of 4, and a perimeter of 8.

* A 1x3 rectangle has an area of 3, and a perimeter of 8.

* A 0x4 rectangle has an area of 0, and a perimeter of 8. (If you don't like this rectangle, you can make one that is arbitrarily close, i.e., a very small width.)

Note that for two SIMILAR figures, any linear measurements are proportional to the scale size, and any area measure is proportional to the square of the scale size - that will make the area proportional to the perimeter, but only for two similar shapes, e.g., two rectangles with the same length-to-width ratio.

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2016-11-01 18:05:27
2016-11-01 18:05:27

For regular polygons , circles, and some other shapes they are dependent. But in general, the two measure different characteristics which results in the absence of dependence.

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Related Questions


Dependent on each other. Both parties have a dependency on one another.


Perimeters can be lower numbers than areas, andthey can be higher numbers than areas.Here's something really cool. Watch this one:I have two rectangles.One rectangle is 2 by 22. The other rectangle is 11 by 13.First rectangle:Perimeter is 48.Area is 44.Area is a lower number.Second rectangle:Perimeter is also 48, same as the first one.Area is 143.Perimeter is a much lower number.==> My two rectangles have the same perimeter but different areas.==> In the first one, the area is the lower number.==> In the second one, the perimeter is the lower number.


It is an adjective which means mutually dependent- dependent upon one another.


Perimeter doesnt exactly matter.unless its a square.you take one sides lengthand multiply by another side.if sides are equal and parallel to anotherand there are only 4 sides.==================================What he's trying to say is:You can't tell. Perimeter doesn't tell you the area. There are an infinite number ofdifferent shapes with different dimensions and different areas that all have thesame perimeter of 24.


Perimeter isn't an unit of measure, it's another name for "outside edge", or "boundary"


They vary from one pool to another.


A dependent variable is controlled by another variable. One amount of one variable can easily change the amount of the dependent variable.



The perimeter of a cube is simply the perimeter of one side of the cube.


If you draw one out, replace it, and draw another out, it's independent. If you draw one out, DON'T replace it, and draw another out, it's dependent. (Similarly if you draw them both out at the same time.)


A perimeter is a 1-dimensional measure while an area is 2-dimensional. The two measure different things and, according to basic principles of dimensional analysis, conversion from one to the other is not valid. For any given perimeter there are infinitely many possible areas and conversely.


Dependent Variable - Note the root word DEPEND. So a dependent variable is when on variable depends on/affects the other.


Interdependence is one thing dependent on another one. This is the sentence containing interdependence.


For the SAME area, you can have DIFFERENT perimeters. Therefore, you can't really calculate the perimeter only from the area, unless you have additional information - such as, what type of shape you are talking about (a circle, a square, a rectangle with a ratio of sides 1:2, etc.).


If changes in one variable do not affect the outcome of another variable, then the second variable is independent. A variable that is not independent is dependent.


The perimeter of a square is the distance around it. To calculate the perimeter of a square, multiply the length fo one side by four. Another way to find perimeter is to add together the length of all sides. To find the perimeter of a square you have to add up the lengths of all the 4 sides (example: 4+4+4+4=16 Perimeter=16). A formula you can use is P=4x (Perimeter=4 times the length of one side)


yes it can; a rectangle 5 by 2 has perimeter 14 and area 10 for example; a rectangle 10 by 2 has perimeter 24 and area 20, both greater.




It is: perimeter/4 = length of one side of the square


Definitely.Rectangle #1: 18 x 2Perimeter = 40Area = 36Rectangle #2: 7 x 6Perimeter = 26Area = 42Rectangle #2 has a less perimeter than #1,but more area.


Perimeter of a rhombus = 4 x (length of one side)(Notice how closely the formula resemblesthe one for the perimeter of a square.)




There is no relationship between the perimeter and the area of a rhombus. Take a rhombus with all 4 sides = 2 units. Therefore the perimeter is 8 units. There are an infinite number of possible areas for this rhombus. The largest possible area will be when the rhombus approaches the shape of a square = 4 square units. The smallest area will be when the one diagonal approaches 0 units and the other diagonal approaches 4 units (squashed almost flat). So two very extreme areas can have the same perimeter, including all those areas in-between.



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