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Why are college kickers able to kick the football out of the endzone while pro kickers have trouble kicking to the 10 yard line?


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2009-10-12 02:36:42
2009-10-12 02:36:42
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Yes there is the five yard difference, but the NFL ball also weighs more.

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The guy who left this answer before I completely reconstructed it was an idiot. There is a 5 yard difference between pro and college, and the ball weighs more. But, most college kickers kick it to the middle of the endzone. Most pro kickers kick it to the goal line consistently. I have no idea where you're gtting this 10 yard line stuff from. So it really evens out.

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