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Answered 2011-09-20 06:04:46

Tasmanian devils became protected by law in June 1941. After this, it became illegal to hunt or trap Tasmanian devils.

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they stopped hunting Tasmanian Devils because it became illegal. They started trapping them so they don't ruin their crops. Like this weren't hunting and killing them.


No. People do not eat Tasmanian devils.


because people are killing them.


Tasmanian devils really aren't the playful sort. They are more interested in scavenging for food, defending their territory and avoiding people.


No. See the related question.


Tasmanian devils are protected by law. Their fur is not used for anything.


There are no reports of Tasmanian devils killing or even injuring people. Tasmanian devils do not actively engage in vicious behaviour against humans. They are quite small creatures, though with very strong, powerful jaws, and they are very shy. They will not attack if unprovoked.


No. Tasmanian devils do not attack people. They are shy and reclusive creatures which would much rather avoid people.


Tasmanian devils were not "invented".The first people to have seen the Tasmanian devil would have been the Tasmanian Aboriginal people. The Tasmanian aboriginal word for the Tasmanian devil is purinina.If the question refers to how the animal gained its name, it was because of its tendency to emit blood-curdling screams during the night when fighting over food or territory. This name was assigned by Europeans.


Hunting, fishing and trapping.


Tasmanian devils are only aggressive when they are asserting their dominance as they gather to feed on a carcass, or as part of their mating ritual. At these times, they are very aggressive. Outside of these situations, Tasmanian devils are shy and reclusive, and would certainly rather run from human contact than confront people.


I like the Tasmanian devils, and so do the Warner Brothers!


No doubt the indigenous Tasmanian Aboriginal people ate Tasmanian devils from time to time. However, it is illegal to harm - let alone eat - a Tasmanian devil now.


Tasmanian Devils are not the playful type. Tasmanian pups may play with each other in their early stages after leaving their mother`s pouch, but Tassies are more aggressive than playful. Tassies like to hunt and scavenge,etc.


Tasmanian devils, being carnivorous marsupials (dasyurids) are at the top of the food chain, so in their native habitat they have no natural predators.Up until around 600 years ago, there were Tasmanian devils on mainland Australia. Whilst both Tasmanian devils and dingoes are at the top of the food chain, the bigger, stronger dingo dominated in the competition for food, resulting in the extinction of the Tasmanian devil from the mainland. It is also quite conceivable that the indigenous people ate them.


There are a number of ways that humans can help the Tasmanian devil. Scientists are breeding Tasmanian Devils in captivity to limit the spread of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). This disease is a great threat to Tasmanian devils living in the wild, affecting some two-thirds of the population. Tasmanian devils are being housed in captive breeding programmes, which should prevent the extinction of the marsupial, but not necessarily in the wild. In January 2010, a team of international scientists pinpointed the genetic marker that predisposes Tasmanian devils towards this fatal disease. With this knowledge, there is now a better chance of a cure, which would also stop the disease decimating the wild Tasmanian devil population. Everyday people can also help. Drivers can be extra careful when driving between dusk and dawn in bush and rural areas, as Tasmanian devils often feed on roadkill beside the road - thereby becoming roadkill themselves.


Ordinary people can be aware that, when driving at night, there may be Tasmanian devils on the side of the road, feeding on roadkill. This is one of the chief threats to the Tasmanian devil, as many are killed by cars. Drive safely and sensibly on Tasmanian roads, and always report injured Tasmanian devils. There are many conservation groups specifically geared towars researching and helping the Tasmanian devil, and people can donate money to these, become involved in fund-raising activities, or sponsor a Tasmanian devil. See the related links below. Scientists are breeding Tasmanian Devils in captivity to limit the spread of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). This disease is a great threat to Tasmanian devils living in the wild, affecting some two-thirds of the population. The Australian Government now has initiatives and programs set up to preserve the species. Tasmanian devils are being housed in captive breeding programmes, which should prevent the extinction of the marsupial, but not necessarily in the wild. In January 2010, a team of international scientists pinpointed the genetic marker that predisposes Tasmanian devils towards this fatal disease. With this knowledge, there is now a better chance of a cure, which would also stop the disease decimating the wild Tasmanian devil population.


Scientists are breeding Tasmanian Devils in captivity to limit the spread of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). This disease is a great threat to Tasmanian devils living in the wild, affecting some two-thirds of the population. The Australian Government now has initiatives and programs set up to preserve the species. Tasmanian devils are being housed in captive breeding programmes, which should prevent the extinction of the marsupial, but not necessarily in the wild. In January 2010, a team of international scientists pinpointed the genetic marker that predisposes Tasmanian devils towards this fatal disease. With this knowledge, there is now a better chance of a cure, which would also stop the disease decimating the wild Tasmanian devil population.


The main enemy of the Tasmanian devil is Man, and there are a number of ways in which people can work (or are working) to limit the impact of man on this unique marsupial. Scientists are breeding Tasmanian Devils in captivity to limit the spread of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). This disease is a great threat to Tasmanian devils living in the wild, affecting some two-thirds of the population. Tasmanian devils are being housed in captive breeding programmes, which should prevent the extinction of the marsupial, but not necessarily in the wild. In January 2010, a team of international scientists pinpointed the genetic marker that predisposes Tasmanian devils towards this fatal disease. With this knowledge, there is now a better chance of a cure, which would also stop the disease decimating the wild Tasmanian devil population. Everyday people can also help. Drivers can be extra careful when driving between dusk and dawn in bush and rural areas, as Tasmanian devils often feed on roadkill beside the road - thereby becoming roadkill themselves.


Well, Many People Have Been Kinda Saying This. It's Not Hard For Me Because The Wolverine Would Win Because Wolverines Are Much More Ferocious.1st Reason: Tazmanian Devil And His Eating Habits On Everything Is So Ridicolous. Tasmanian Devils Only Have The Word "Devil" Because Of It's Screams. Wolverines Eat Alot Of Things, Tasmanian Devils Mainly Eat Carrion.2nd Reason: Wolverines Are Much Larger And Heavier Than Tasmanian Devils.3rd Reason: Tasmanian Devils Are Slower Than Wolverines.And Yes, I Know They Don't Meet.


Tasmanian devils are already endangered, so they cannot be saved from this. There are measures, however, to prevent their extinction. Scientists are breeding Tasmanian Devils in captivity to limit the spread of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). This disease is a great threat to Tasmanian devils living in the wild, affecting some two-thirds of the population. The Australian Government now has initiatives and programs set up to preserve the species. Tasmanian devils are being housed in captive breeding programmes, which should prevent the extinction of the marsupial, but not necessarily in the wild. In January 2010, a team of international scientists pinpointed the genetic marker that predisposes Tasmanian devils towards this fatal disease. With this knowledge, there is now a better chance of a cure, which would also stop the disease decimating the wild Tasmanian devil population. Ordinary people have a part to play as well. Many devils are killed by cars as they feed on roadside carrion, so drivers should be careful as they travel through bushland areas, particularly at night.


If I remember correctly, Tasmanian Tigers were attacking livestock in Australia, so hunters were offered rewards for killing them. People then kept hunting them to extinction.


No.. the Tasmanian devil is simply just an animal in the regular food chain... Humans... however at the top of the food chain... which means humans should not be scared of tasmainian devils


Scientists are breeding Tasmanian Devils in captivity to limit the spread of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). This disease is a great threat to Tasmanian devils living in the wild, affecting some two-thirds of the population.The Australian Government now has initiatives and programs set up to preserve the species. Tasmanian devils are being housed in captive breeding programmes, which should prevent the extinction of the marsupial, but not necessarily in the wild. In January 2010, a team of international scientists pinpointed the genetic marker that predisposes Tasmanian devils towards this fatal disease. With this knowledge, there is now a better chance of a cure, which would also stop the disease decimating the wild Tasmanian devil population.The "Save the Tasmanian Devil" campaign helps the Tasmanian devil, with the objective being to 'maintain an enduring and ecologically functional population of Tasmanian Devils in the wild in Tasmania'. This programme is a joint initiative between the Australian Federal and Tasmanian State governments, together with the University of Tasmania.More sponsorship has come through the car company Suzuki Australia which has developed a is partnership with Zoos Victoria. Suzuki donates an amount from the sale of each Suzuki SUV to help save the Tasmanian Devil.


Tasmanian Devils have extremely strong jaws and can cause quite a lot of damage when they bite. They become fierce around food. They are mostly scavengers, but can prey on animals up to the size of a small kangaroo. Tasmanian devils are not at all dangerous to people. Despite their reputation, they are actually timid and shy creatures which would rather hide from people than confront them. They never attack people, but will certainly defend themselves, and it is true that they have exceptionally powerful jaws.



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