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Answered 2015-07-16 17:37:48

The Great Schism of 1054 AD had three main causes, which were: 1) Papal claims of supremacy, 2) the change to the Creed (adding the 'filioque'), and 3) Papal teachings about purgatory and indulgences.

In addition to these, there were a few other lesser reasons, such as the use of unleavened bread, the laity receiving communion as bread only, rather than bread and wine together, the separation of baptism and confirmation, and the compulsory celibacy of Catholic clergy, the use of statues, and not allowing divorced people to re-marry. However, most other beliefs about the Christian faith remain the same.

The reasons for the East/West schism are complicated and developed over a period of many centuries; even the date of 1054 is largely symbolic of a process that started much earlier and ended much later. There were cultural, linguistic, and liturgical differences from rather early, and although these were never seen as church-dividing, they probably contributed to mutual misunderstandings. The two biggest issues were the addition of the word filioque (and the Son) to the Western text of the Creed, and the growth of papal power. In addition were a host of smaller conflicts, over matters such as the use of leavened bread vs. unleavened bread for the Eucharist, fasting on Saturday, etc. The schism was probably inevitable by the ninth century, but a case can be made that it was not "final" until the East repudiated the reunion Council of Florence in 1453. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- : Historical background During the period of persecution, the Early Christian Church developed differently according to the part of the Roman Empire; the Church in the East developed differently from the West and the Church in Africa (Copts) differed again. After the legalisation of Christianity, the Church came to accept that there were 3 main leaders (Patriarchs): the bishops of Alexandria, Antioch and Rome. To these were added the bishop of Constantinople (by the Council of Constantinople in 381) and the bishop of Jerusalem (by the Council of Chalcedon in 451). With Constantine's transfer of the capital of the Empire to Constantinople, the Empire was effectively split into two sections: East and West. (Diocletian formally divided the Empire into 2 sections in early part of the 4th century) The Church When the western part of the Empire fell into decay, and was eventually overrun by invaders, the political, judicial and social responsibilities of its officials were assumed by the leaders of the Church in the West, centred on Rome. Inevitably, this dual responsibility led to a centralisation and codification of the manner in which things were done in the Western part of the Church. The Church in the East, largely unaffected by the collapse of the Western Empire, continued to be less centralised. As time progressed, the Bishop of Rome (acknowledged by the others as being First Among Equals) began to claim greater authority due to the apostles Peter and Paul being martyred in that city. This claim was refuted by the other patriarchs. However, Rome's position became strengthened when the spread of Islam effectively isolated and diminished the influence the Patriarchs of Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem, leaving Rome and Constantinople in something of a state of rivalry. A further cause of tension arose when the Western Church inserted the "filioque" into Nicene Creed. Traditionally, the Holy Spirit was seen to proceed from God the Father; the insertion of the "filioque" clause meant that, in the West, the Holy Spirit was believed to proceed from God the Father and God the Son. For the Church in the East, Rome had overstepped its authority by altering a Creed which had been approved by an ecumenical council. In 867 the Patriarch of Constantinople (Photius I)declared the insertion to be heretical, thereby accusing the Patriarch of the West (the Bishop of Rome) of heresy. Other factors also caused the East and West to drift apart: language, different manners of liturgical celebration, different approaches to solving ecclesiastical conflict, different ways of explaining doctrine and the gradual imposition of clerical celibacy in the West. The consummation of the schism is generally dated to 16 July 1054 due to a disagreement between the Patriarch of Constantinople and the papal legate who had been sent to solve a disagreement several matters: the type of bread to be used in the Eucharist, the claim to greater power by the Bishop of Rome and the Patriarch's use of the title "Ecumenical". However, in reality little changed in the lives of ordinary Christians or the clergy. The two churches continued to drift apart with the rise of nation states in the West (the Byzantine Empire continued) and the disaster of the Fourth Crusade when the crusaders attacked and looted Constantinople. In brief, as was already mentioned in the first , the schism between East and West developed over centuries and the reasons are several: linguistic, societal, judicial, ecclesiastical, political and theological. See related links

CatholicThere is no one simple for this tragic split of the Church into two halves, it went on for centuries, and if it had been a simple , would have been healed by now. But there are many things that went into it, sadly many of them were political not religious. It is to be hoped that the split will be healed soon, and we should all keep this in our daily prayers.

.

from The Modern Catholic Dictionary, edited byDonald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Schism of the East

the estrangement and severance from the Holy See of what is now called the Orthodox Eastern Church was a gradual process extending over centuries. After a number of minor schisms the first serious, though short, break was that of Photius; from then on tension between East and West increased, and the schism of Cerularius occurred in 1054. From then on the breach gradually widened and has been definitive since 1472. There was a formal union from the 2nd Council of Lyons in 1274 until 1282, and a more promising one after the Council of Florence from 1439 to 1472. After the capture of Constantinople it was in the Turkish interest to reopen and widen the breach with the powerful Roman church; the patriarchates of Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were dragged into this policy, Russia and the Slav churches stood out the longest of any: none of these churches, except Constantinople itself in 1472, formally and definitely broke away from the unity of the Church. But in the course of centuries the schism has set and crystallized into a definite separation from the Holy See of many million people with a true priesthood and valid sacraments. The origins, causes and development of the schism are matters of much complication, still not fully unraveled.

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Answered 2015-02-09 18:45:33

Catholic Answer
There is no one simple answer for this tragic split of the Church into two halves, it went on for centuries, and if it had been a simple answer, would have been healed by now. But there are many things that went into it, sadly many of them were political not religious. It is to be hoped that the split will be healed soon, and we should all keep this in our daily prayers.

from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Schism of the East the estrangement and severance from the Holy See of what is now called the Orthodox Eastern Church was a gradual process extending over centuries. After a number of minor schisms the first serious, though short, break was that of Photius; from then on tension between East and West increased, and the schism of Cerularius occurred in 1054. From then on the breach gradually widened and has been definitive since 1472. There was a formal union from the 2nd Council of Lyons in 1274 until 1282, and a more promising one after the Council of Florence from 1439 to 1472. After the capture of Constantinople it was in the Turkish interest to reopen and widen the breach with the powerful Roman church; the patriarchates of Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were dragged into this policy, Russia and the Slav churches stood out the longest of any: none of these churches, except Constantinople itself in 1472, formally and definitely broke away from the unity of the Church. But in the course of centuries the schism has set and crystallized into a definite separation from the Holy See of many million people with a true priesthood and valid sacraments. The origins, causes and development of the schism are matters of much complication, still not fully unraveled.

from Modern Catholic Dictionary by John A. Hardon, S.J. Doubleday & Co., Inc. Garden City, NY 1980

Separation of the Christian Churches of the East from unity with Rome. The schism was centuries in the making and finally became fixed in 1054, when the Patriarch of Constantinople, Michael Cerularisu (died 1059), was excommunicated by the papal legates for opposing the use of leavened bread by the Latin Church and removing the Pope's name from the diptychs or list of persons to be prayed for in the Eucharistic liturgy. A temporary reunion with Rome was effected by the Second Council of Lyons (1274) and the Council of Florence (1439) but never stabilized.

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The Eastern Orthodox church and the Roman Catholic church split in the Great Schism. The Church of England later split from the Roman Catholic church, but did not in any way align itself with the Eastern Orthodox church.


Catholics will say that the Orthodox church split from the Catholic Church. Orthodox will say that the Catholic Church split from the Orthodox church. But yes, the two churches did split from one another.


Roman Catholic AnswerIt was called the Schism of the East, when the Orthodox Church broke away from the Catholic Church.


The Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.


Christianity can be divided into three parts: the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and Protestantism. The Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church split in the 11th Century. Protestantism was born from Reformation in the 16th Century and split from the Roman Catholic Church at that time.


The Eastern Orthodox Church in Constinantinople split from the Roman Catholic Church in Rome.


In 1054 Christ's which (except for small groups of heretics and the Oriental Orthodox) was generally undivided and truly one split into the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. The Orthodox would see the division this way: before 1054 there was just the Orthodox Church. After 1054 there was the Orthodox Church and the heretical church of the Patriarch of Rome, which would eventually call itself the Roman Catholic Church. The Romans would say that prior to 1054 there was just the Roman Catholic Church and then the Orthodox split off becoming a separate church. The way I, an Anglo Catholic, see it was that they both split from each other creating the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. Neither church really existed as a separate denomination before. The denominational terms came into existence because of the tragic split.


The split between the Eastern Orthodox and the western Catholic Churches was caused by a number of different factors. Namely, neither side could decide on the Pope's role in the church, or the scope of his authority.




schismAnswer:It is when The Great Schism occurred, causing The Roman Catholic Church to split off The Orthodox Church.


Short answer: it was one of the causes of the split between the western and eastern Christian churches. The result of the split (schism) is the Catholic church (western) and Orthodox church (eastern).


The East West Schism happened in 1054, and the Catholic Church, which was by far the largest Christian Church, broke into the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.


The Orthodox Church split from the Catholic Church.


Christian--Constantinople split with the Roman Catholic church in 1054 and became the center of the Eastern Orthodox Church.


The Christian Church split into two separate churches in 1504, because of friction between the pope in Rome and the patriarch in Constantinople. The church in the West became the Roman Catholic Church, and the church in the East became the Eastern Orthodox Church.


Roman Catholic AnswerCatholic, by about a thousand years; the Orthodox split from the Catholic Church in the eleventh century.


The Catholic Church was split in 1054 in the East-West Schism, into the Roman Catholic Church, in the West, and the Eastern Orthodox Church. The reason for this split was a disagreement over what authority the pope had in eastern dioceses. Put simply, the Western Church held the pope was a ruling authority, but the Eastern Church would only accept the pope as a symbolic authority. You should remember that there were other Churches aside from the Catholic Church at the time, including the Oriental Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, and others, so the entire Christian Church was not involved. There is a link below that you can use for more information. The most important dispute that split the Church was over the supremacy of the Pope, versus the independence of the bishops, particularly of the East. This produced the East-West Schism of 1054, which divided the largest body of the Church into the Roman Catholic Church, in the West, and the Eastern Orthodox Church, in the East. There is a link below.


Nothing can "split" the Catholic Church as it is divinely established and guarded. However, there have been two famous cases that tried: the Western Schism when there was a pope or antipope in Avignon and Rome; and the Eastern Schism when the Orthodox left the Catholic Church.


That's a bit difficult to explain. There was one church called 'The Catholic Orthodox church" it split into Orthodox and Catholic. However there are two Orthodox churches which both preserve the ancient teachings and traditions of the original church. Except have a different view of the divintiy of christ. The Eastern "Oriental' Orthodox church believes that christ has two natures but united while the Eastern Orthodox church believes that chirst has two natures but seperate. However,they both are the original church and have not changed the apostolic traditions. So the Roman Catholic Church and Orthodox Churches are equally old since they were both founded by one of the apostles,however the Orthodox church stayed true to the original churches beliefs and traditions. But they became referred to as "Orthodox" in 451 AD (Eastern "Oriental' Orthodox) and in 1054 (Eastern Orthodox)


The year in which you are talking about is 1054. The reason this year is important is because of the Great Schism when The Roman Catholic Church split off The Orthodox Church.


Roman Catholic AnswerThe first major split form the Church that has lasted until today was the Eastern Church which was centered in Constantinople, which is the country of modern day Turkey. .Catholic Answer:The Orthodox, who split from The Catholic Church in 1054 because they rejected Papal Supremacy, the Filioque, and a few other political reasons. As noted above, this was in what is now modern day Turkey.The Assyrian Church of the East separated from the other Catholic/Orthodox churches at the Council of Ephesus in 431 AD.Other groups had separated from the Catholic/Orthodox church prior to this, but have long since disappeared.Well, the people that are now called Eastern Orthodox were the first ones to break away from the church. That would be Greece.


it is actually not byzantine orthodox. it is actually the church. the churches in the byzantium were called the Eastern Orthodox Church. at first there was only a common church. but later there were dispute among pope and the patriarch and actually the western Europe and the eastern Europe. so,there was a split, in the west, the churches were called the Roman Catholic Church as the pope as the head and the churches in the east were known as the Eastern Orthodox Church with the patriarch as the head. so the reason for the Byzantium getting the eastern orthodox church is because byzantium is in the eastern European side.


The Catholic Church has had several Eastern Rites for most of her history. In the eleventh century, most of the Eastern Rites split in two, which half of each Rite remained with the church and half forming the new Orthodox Church. Thus the Greek Orthodox Church has the same liturgy as the Greek Uniate Church, but they are no longer in communion with Rome. Nearly all of the Eastern Rites did this, although I do not think that there is a "Russian" Uniate Church. Anyway, all of the Orthodox Churches are not in union with Rome.


The year 1054 marked the split in Medieval Christianity into Eastern and Western branches, also known as the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church. This split is sometimes referred to as the East-West Schism or the Great Schism.



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