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Polar Bears

Why do polar bears have white fur?

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September 14, 2017 6:03AM

Polar bears do not have white fur, but semi-transparent fur. The polar bear's fur seems colourless and for many years, scientists worked on the theory that the individual hairs act as fiber optics bringing sunlight directly to the skin. This has recently been proven to be incorrect, and the hairs are not truly transparent, but contain keratin. Viewed side-on, the hairs appear colourless; viewed lengthwise (as if one was looking down a telescope) the hairs no longer appear transparent.
Polar Bears are white because the sun washed the color out of the sun and turned the fur folicoles white.
Actually this is common misconception. Polar bears do not have white fur, rather they have "transparent" hair or hollow tubes as hair that easily reflect the visible light spectrum and make them appear white. Mainly it is for camouflage in the bear's natural habitat, which is snow and ice in order to more easily hunt seals, fish and walrus.
Actually this is common misconception. Polar bears do not have white fur, rather they have "transparent" hair or hollow tubes as hair that easily reflect the visible light spectrum and make them appear white. Mainly it is for camouflage in the bear's natural habitat, which is snow and ice in order to more easily hunt seals, fish and walrus.