Astronomy

Why do you name constellations?

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2012-01-26 16:43:47
2012-01-26 16:43:47

To have a way to refer to the patterns of the sky. #SWAG

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most of the constellations were named after mythologies.



The "classical" zodiac consists of 12 constellations, most of them represent some animal (hence the name). According to the current definitions of constellations, however, the Sun goes through 13 constellations.The "classical" zodiac consists of 12 constellations, most of them represent some animal (hence the name). According to the current definitions of constellations, however, the Sun goes through 13 constellations.The "classical" zodiac consists of 12 constellations, most of them represent some animal (hence the name). According to the current definitions of constellations, however, the Sun goes through 13 constellations.The "classical" zodiac consists of 12 constellations, most of them represent some animal (hence the name). According to the current definitions of constellations, however, the Sun goes through 13 constellations.


they would name these constellations because when they were travailing they would makes names for the constellations to find their villages one famous name was Dakudo which means where the home is.


The Ancient Arabs, Greeks, Hindus, Romans - they all helped name the constellations. Different cultures have different names for the constellations.


There are handful of constellations thought of as "Winter constellations" - you would have to specify the name of the constellation.


No, it does not have a name. The name "solar system" is the only thing we call it. It does NOT have a specific name. But, constellations in the solar system do have specific names. No, it does not have a name. The name "solar system" is the only thing we call it. It does NOT have a specific name. But, constellations in the solar system do have specific names. No, it does not have a name. The name "solar system" is the only thing we call it. It does NOT have a specific name. But, constellations in the solar system do have specific names.


What I have done to learn about constellations are as followed: 1.Answer the following questions: A.Knowledge-Name 5 constellations and what they mean. B.Comprehension-What are constellations? Who first connected the stars to make pictures? Tell this is 100-150 words. C.Application-Tell how Andromeda and Cepheus are related. Draw a map of the constellations that includes Andromeda, Cephues, Casseopia, and others surrounding them. D.Analysis-Put the constellations in labeled catagories. E.Synthesis-Make a new constellation. Give it a name, meaning, and story. F.Evaluation-Which constellations is your favorite? Why?


many ancient civilizations created there own constellations but the ones most people use today were created from the Greeks


Periodic showers which, due to their position and trajectory, appear to originate from specific constellations are named for that constellation.




Those would be "constellations".


Yes, constellations should be capitalized.


Canis Major is a constellation, included in the Ptolemy's 48 constellations, and still included among the 88 constellations.


Hi Yall. The Answer To This Is Leo And Roan. My Name Is Becky Ralli


The 12 zodiac constellations that the star signs are based on are: Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpius, Sagittarius, Capricornus, Aquarius, and Pisces. Note that the star signs Scorpio and Capricorn do not have the same name as their associated constellations.


These are the ZODIACAL CONSTELLATIONS - the constellations of the zodiac.


There are over 88 listed Constellations - too many to name here.


The astronomers put the name acording to the date and how it look.



The Greeks really named quite a few.


Either "constellations" or "asterisms".



There are no constellations in the Earth. They are in space. There are 88 official constellations.



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