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2009-12-11 21:03:31
2009-12-11 21:03:31

There the same, only a direction must be indicated

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Speed and velocity always have the same magnitude, becausespeed is the magnitude of velocity.The difference is that velocity has a direction but speed doesn't


No. If you are talking about "velocity", then you are talking about magnitude and direction - i.e., vectors. You can't really compare vectors, in the sense of one vector being greater than another; but you can compare their magnitudes - and the magnitude is always non-negative. In this sense, you can't even have a "velocity of minus 4 m/s" - you would have a "velocity of 4 m/s in a certain direction".


Yes, always. Velocity is a vector, meaning it has both a magnitude and a direction. You must account for the direction. Speed is the magnitude of velocity and has no direction.


The magnitude of the velocity is always equal to the speed. But velocity is a vector quantity (has a magnitude and direction) while speed is just a scalar quantity (only magnitude). So velocity and speed are never equal.


Speed is the magnitude of distance travelled per unit time, whereas velocity depends on the magnitude of distance travelled as well as the direction of motion. Speed is a scalar quantity, velocity is a vector. Speed cannot be negative, velocity can be negative. Average speed of an object after travelling a certain distance is always non-zero, but for velocity the average velocity can be zero (this follows from the previous idea).


If a moving body with constant velocity is always equal to acceleration but the force exerted by an magnitude charged body is called magnitude of force


Velocity has direction as well as magnitude. Speed only has magnitude. So the velocity of something can change without its speed changing. This is what is happening when something is going in a circle.


Because speed is the magnitude of the velocity vector. The velocity consists of the speed and the direction, and the whole thing can be embodied in a 3D vector. If you like the velocity is the magnitude (the speed), which is a scalar (just a real number), multiplied by a unit vector in the right direction.


The speed (magnitude of velocity) is always 9.8 meters per second (32.2 feet per second) greater than it was exactly one second earlier. If the object spent "N" seconds falling, then its speed (magnitude of velocity) is 9.8N meters per second (32.2N feet per second) greater at the bottom than it was at the top. The direction of velocity remains constant under the influence of gravity ... straight down.


speed is a scalar quantity with magnitude only but no direction; velocity is a vector with both magnitude (speed) AND direction, which could be positive or negative


Speed is equal to the magnitude of velocity almost always. Speed is total distance / total time no matter which way the distance goes. Velocity is the distance from a starting point divided by total time.


The velocity ratio is always greater than mechanical advantage in a simple machine. The output work is always less than the input work.


Velocity has speed and direction. Speed only has speed. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Speed is a scalar quantity having only magnitude But velocity is a vector quantity having both magnitude and direction. So a body is said to move with uniform speed around a circle but not with uniform velocity as the direction is always changing.


It doesn't necessarily mean that the final velocity is always greater than the initial, if the initial velocity was at rest or 0 m/s then any form of movement would be greater. In cases where the final is smaller is like running into a wall or a decrease in acceleration.


Velocity is always a scalar, instantaneous or average doesn't matter.


(any unit of length) / (any unit of time) is a unit that can be used for the magnitude (size) of velocity, and must always be accompanied by a description of direction. Without it, all you have is a speed, not a velocity.


(any unit of length) / (any unit of time) is a unit that can be used for the magnitude (size) of velocity, and must always be accompanied by a description of direction. Without it, all you have is a speed, not a velocity.


The direction of the velocity is always downward, but its magnitude keeps growing. It's always 9.8 meters per second faster than it was one second earlier.


No. Velocity is a 'vector', which means it's a measurement that has both magnitude and direction. The magnitude is what we usually call the 'speed'. For an object moving in a circle, it could have constant speed ... the velocity could have constant magnitude ... but there's no way the whole velocity vector could be constant, because the direction is always changing. Constant velocity is very easy to recognize ... the object is moving at a steady speed, in a straight line.


This is not always the case. But if an object moves in a circle, at constant speed, its velocity will change. Velocity is a vector - consisting of the magnitude (the speed), and a direction. So by definition, if the direction changes, the velocity changes - you have a different vector.


I think it is cuz speed is velocity it's just a vector (more difficult name)


Yes, the magnitude of speed is the same as the magnitude of velocity. Velocity V= s(R/r)= sR' where s is the speed and R'=(R/r) is the unit vector in the direction R, where R is a position vector and r is the magnitude of R. So "s' is the magnitude (scalar) of the velocity. In Physics, a rotating object can have constant speed and changing direction. A car can have the same speed on the speedometer and experience a force as it turns at the this constant speed. The turning creates a force as there is acceleration caused by the change in velocity, in this case the change in direction, not the change in speed..


This question revolves around the idea of vector quantities. Vector quantities involve two factors: magnitude and direction. Velocity (as well as average velocity) is a vector quantity. The given value of 100m is a magnitude of a distance which is a scalar quantity. Average velocity can be represented as below (all V's represent velocity, not speed). Vavg = ½ (Vi + Vf ). Let us say that an object was traveling at an initial velocity of 15m/s [East] for a certain amount of time. Afterward, the object suddenly travels at a final velocity of 15m/s [West] for a certain amount of time. In total, the object may have traveled 100m. Because the direction of the two velocities are opposite, the magnitude of the two values are opposite of one another. In other words, Vavg = ½ (0m/s) = 0. Therefore, it is important to always think about the direction an object is travellng when a vector quantity is involved.



Velocity is a vector quantity, thus you must consider both magnitude and direction. The direction determines whether the value is positive or negative too



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