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2014-12-04 17:40:36
2014-12-04 17:40:36

may indicate there was an brain injury

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Head (Unless you're a Fighter pilot... Then of course you'll miss this question, because the words "Cranium", "Skull" and "Noggin" are not available options)


You should use an OPA (oropharyngeal airway) or NPA (nasopharyngeal airway) in less severe cases of upper airway obstruction. For example, an OPA or NPA can be helpful in a child with Pierre-Robin Syndrome causing obstruction of the upper airway at the level of the tongue. An OPA should ONLY be used in an unconscious patient, as it will stimulate gagging. NPA's should be inserted carefully to avoid nasopharyngeal trauma and bleeding. NPA's are CONTRAINDICATED in severe head or facial injuries (bruising behind the ears, raccoon eyes, blood or clear fluid leaking out of the ears or nose), patients on anticoagulants, patients with nasal infections, and patients with nasal deformities.A nasopharyngeal airway is used when you don't want to intubate the victim. Sometimes all you need is that open airway.Open airway


The clear liquid could be indicative of a basilar skull fracture.



A nasopharyngeal airway is contraindicated in the following situations:- Evidence of Battle's Sign (bruising behind the ear)- Severe facial of cranial injuries.- Signs of cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) or raccoon eyes.NB: the clear fluid coming out of the patient's nose or ears is most likely CSF. CSF protects and insulates the brain, and can leak from the skull if there is head trauma.The above situations indicate the possibility of a traumatic brain injury (previously termed 'head injury'). The risk of the nasopharyngeal airway intruding with the brain is fairly high so as a precaution, an alternative airway is used. An oropharyngeal airway would be a better alternative in a patient with suspected traumatic brain injury.A nasopharyngeal airway, (aka NPA or a nasal trumpet), is a tube inserted into the nasal passageway of an unconscious victim to provide an open airway (when unconscious the jaw muscles relax and the tongue to falls back obstructing the airway).NPA is contraindicated (not used) in patients with severe head or facial injuries, or a basilar skull fracture (Battle's sign, raccoon eyes, cerebrospinal fluid/blood from ears, etc.) due to the possibility of direct contact with brain tissue.






A nasopharyngeal airway, (aka NPA or a nasal trumpet), is a tube inserted into the nasal passageway of an unconscious victim to provide an open airway (when unconscious the jaw muscles relax and the tongue to falls back obstructing the airway).If your patient presents with one or more of the following, you would NOT use a nasopharyngeal airway:severe maxillofacial trauma,periorbital echymosis,retroauricular echymosis,significantly deformed nares or septum.NOTE: nasopharyngeal airways are CONTRAINDICATED in severe head or facial injuries (bruising behind the ears, raccoon eyes, blood or clear fluid leaking out of the ears or nose), patients on anticoagulants, patients with nasal infections, and patients with nasal deformities.This may indicate a brain injuryThis may indicate a brain injury.


A nasopharyngeal airway, (aka NPA or a nasal trumpet), is a tube inserted into the nasal passageway of an unconscious victim to provide an open airway (when unconscious the jaw muscles relax and the tongue to falls back obstructing the airway).NPA is contraindicated (not used) in patients with severe head or facial injuries, or a basilar skull fracture (Battle's sign, raccoon eyes, cerebrospinal fluid/blood from ears, etc.) due to the possibility of direct contact with brain tissue.


A nasopharyngeal airway, (aka NPA or a nasal trumpet), is a tube inserted into the nasal passageway of an unconscious victim to provide an open airway (when unconscious the jaw muscles relax and the tongue to falls back obstructing the airway).NPA is contraindicated (not used) in patients with severe head or facial injuries, or a basilar skull fracture (Battle's sign, raccoon eyes, cerebrospinal fluid/blood from ears, etc.) due to the possibility of direct contact with brain tissue.


This is the procedure for inserting the nasopharyngeal airway:Is the nasal canal clear? Make sure nose is not broken and remove any obstructions.Can you rule out basal skull fracture?Measure victim for size needed and select the appropriate airway. Measure the NPA from the corner of the nare to the tip of the earlobe to get the correct size. an NPA that is too large may obstruct the airway, and one which is too small may not be effective.Apply water-based lubricant. There should be lubricant packed with the airwayInsert airway into R nostril: starting at 90 degrees, use a twisting motion as you move down to a 45 degree angle.Ventilate the victim.NOTE: nasopharyngeal airways are CONTRAINDICATED in severe head or facial injuries (bruising behind the ears, raccoon eyes, blood or clear fluid leaking out of the ears or nose), patients on anticoagulants, patients with nasal infections, and patients with nasal deformities.Lubricate the outside of the tube with a water-based lubricant.


First check the airway. Make sure clear of any foreign objects like a ball or bone. If the airway is clear then get to your Veterinarian or to the nearest Emergency Clinic immediately.


It will first advise that it will analyze (in which case nobody should touch the patient). Next, it will advise if a shock is or isn't required.


The clear fluid may be cerebrospinal fluid ( CSF), which would indicate a brain or spinal injury (skull fracture or severe damage to the spine).---In a trauma patient, clear fluid draining from the nose or ears is considered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) until proven otherwise. One would not use a nasopharyngeal (NP) airway in this patient due to the (small, but theoretically possible) risk of cribriform plate fracture and passing the NP airway into the cerebrum.An oropharyngeal airway would be a better choice in this patient, allowing one to ventilate the patient until a definitive airway could be established, if indicated.The halo test can be used to check if the fluid is, in fact, CSF. A small amount of the fluid is allowed to drain onto a 4x4 or filter paper. Blood will collect in the center, and if it is CSF, a clear-yellow ring will surround the blood. This is not a terribly specific test, but allows one to crudely determine if CSF rhinorrhea is present.This may indicate a brain injury.


Chest compressions are for cardiac problems, to maintain some blood circulation. The Heimlich Maneuver is for a blocked airway. If the person has a blocked airway and Heimlich did not clear it, chest compressions are not going to help. Find other ways to clear the airway.


The action to clear a blocked airway is an abdominal thrust. This is called the Heimlich maneuver. This is a technique for a conscious victim who is 1 years old or older.


If the patient is choking, the first priority is to clear the airway, not check the pulse. The airway should be cleared first, and then once the rescue breaths go in, check for a pulse.


Roll the patient on their side, clear the airway (remove the vomit), roll them on their back, open the airway (head tilt chin lift method), resume CPR.


A nasopharyngeal airway, (aka NPA or a nasal trumpet), is a tube inserted into the nasal passageway of an unconscious victim to provide an open airway (when unconscious the jaw muscles relax and the tongue to falls back obstructing the airway).The clear, straw like fluid coming out of the ears is called cerebro-spinal fluid [CSF]. CSF is the liquid that lines the space between the skull and brain to protect this sensitive organ. In the event of a traumatic brain injury (commonly known as head trauma), this fluid may leak out from the ears or nose due to structural damage.Should a traumatic brain injury be suspected, the patient needs to have medical intervention urgently. Complications of brain injury include cerebral compression among many other serious conditions.Introducing a nasopharyngeal airway, nasogastric tube, or attempting to nasally intubate a person with basilar skull fractures carries the risk of inadvertently passing the device through the fracture and into the skull damaging the brain.NPA is contraindicated (not used) in patients with severe head or facial injuries, or a basilar skull fracture (Battle's sign, raccoon eyes, cerebrospinal fluid/blood from ears, etc.) due to the possibility of direct contact with brain tissue.The theory to test for this is simple enough. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood don't mix, much like water and oil. Put a dab of the patient's blood on a piece of gauze and see if the blood and CSF separate. This looks a little bit like a halo, so this test is called a halo test.A nasopharyngeal airway, (aka NPAor a nasal trumpet), is a tube inserted into the nasal passageway of an unconscious victim to provide an open airway (when unconscious the jaw muscles relax and the tongue to falls back obstructing the airway).NPA is contraindicated (not used) in patients with severe head or facial injuries, or a basilar skull fracture (Battle's sign, raccoon eyes, cerebrospinal fluid/blood from ears, etc.) due to the possibility of direct contact with brain tissue.


Performing the abdominal thrusts and back blows should dislodge the object; sweeping the object out with your finger removes it from the throat.




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