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Answered 2009-10-04 09:18:41

In medieval times, religion was the #1 central thing to life. Religion was your culture, your education, your beliefs, everything. These were sad times and people relied on religion to save them. And so they loved their church.

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In medieval times there were often kings and queens. I would say there would be a castle, perhaps a church, and watch tower.


Yes. Almost all medieval art was made for the Church.


Medieval ChurchesHere are 10 sentences about medieval churches-The church in medieval times was much more important in England than it is today. In medieval times EVERYBODY believed that there was a god, heaven and hell. Peasants worked on the church's land for free. People were expected to pay 'taxes' which back then were called tithes. In medieval times the church would be the only stone building in the village. The windows in the churches were shaped in the form of a lancet. Most of the churches had a crucifix- known as a rood. In the churches people sat or stood for the mass in the nave. The church was an ever present facet of the average man's life in medieval times. Churches were made entirely with peasant contributions of money and work


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to try to protect a village or villages


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