History, Politics & Society
International Relations
US Government
The Great Depression

Why was there no middle class in the Great Depression?

171819

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2009-12-20 19:04:46
2009-12-20 19:04:46
Answer

The middle classes were still there during the Great Depression. Any suggestion that everyone was reduced to grinding poverty is inaccurate.

The difference during the Depression was that employment was very much lower, so that the number of "middle class" individuals decreased as a percentage of the population. Many of those who were still working also received less income, and the availability of consumer goods was sharply diminished.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


The Great Depression caused middle class families to lose their homes and possessions. They would have likely lost jobs that allowed them to have their homes and possessions.

We are more in a recession, not a real depression, but it will have similar characteristics due to the government because the government will take control of everything and eliminate the middle class in a Marxist fashion. Like in the Great Depression, there is only really rich, and poor.

A great example to represent the middle class in The Great Gatsby is, The Valley of Ashes.

Yes, since both died in 1934, right in the middle of the Great Depression.

many middle class that had money in the stock market suffered lost money became drifters others lived in hoovervilles and others had low paying jobs that just barely kept them going

In 1935 FDR signed a Presidential order legalizing collective bargaining. This was the beginning of the middle class in America.

The great amount of jobs created were the basis for our middle class to stabilize themselves and the job was completed by WWII!

Horse sperm shots were fairly common among the middle and upper class after the great depression, if horses werent avaliable they would mix their own sperm with urine and share it with the other people in their household. ;)

The Great Depression led to widespread unemployment. Extreme poverty was inflicted on both middle class and lower class and in some cases even upper class. Suicide rates jumped high. People lost their homes and farms. Many moved to live in 'Hoovervilles'. There was social unrest within the society. The effect even reflected on other countries and trade reduced substantially. The idea of social security also became prominent after the Great depression.

Life in the South for the upper middle class was carefree

The entire fabric of American society was altered during the Great Depression. One percent of the American people controlled the wealth. The middle class Americans were now on a level with the previously poverty-stricken class. They lost jobs, homes, and entire ways of life.

To get the American economy out of the Great Depression. He did it by enacting many acts to help the lower to middle class and the old folks.

The Great Depression took place during the 1930's and lasted until the middle of the 1940's. The Great Depression was started by the stock market crash in 1929.

Because he taxed the middle and lower class too much and it made things worse.

By most methods of calculation, the Depression ended in 1942, or earlier. By the middle of 1942, jobs were plentiful.

We were in the end\middle of the great depression.

bad because it was middle of the great depression

Poor people far outnumbered middle class in the Middle Ages. The serfs and other peasants were the great majority of the population, and the Middle Class was very small. So there were more cottages for poor people than middle class houses.

What did the Great Depression effect? What was the effect of the Great Depression?

The economy grew in the 1920s as consumers gained more wealth. The 1920s were a time when the middle class was growing well. That was stopped for time by the Great Depression.


Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.