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Car Starting Problems
Car Stalling Problems
Chevy Camaro RS

Why would a car start and then die and not start again until cooled?

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2005-04-03 08:00:48
2005-04-03 08:00:48

i had this problem on a older ford it was the module in the bottom of the distributor and the same problem in a newer car and it was the module under the coil packs The last answer is correct. Although it could also be the coil pack. If the resistance is off a little bit, it will get worse as the vehicle heats up. It will then kick the auto shut down relay and your done till it resets. Check the module and the coil pack. Depending on the kind of vehicle you have it could be either or both if it's a GM car from the 1980s or 1990s the fuel filter can get clogged to the point where the engine will stall after it's warmed up even tho the fuel pump etc etc are all okay. it does this because the filter is is mounted low and it's filling up due to gravity when the car is off. this often happens on Firebirds/Camaros and can be quite a problem. try changing the fuel filter. ps The diagnostic computer will often fail to see the problem

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try replacing the ignition coil. after it hots, it starts breaking down and will not fire again until it cools off

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check ur starter the internal metal brushed might be swelling up and stoping it from starting i had that happen on my old ford when oil driped in to the starter and when i would stop after the car was warm it would cut off and wouldn't start until the starter cooled when i replaced it, it never happened again.

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My 92 PA had the same problem. After it cooled down it would start again. The crank and the cam sensors were found to be bad. These were replaced and I have had no problem since.

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Ran into this same problem on my 1991 Grand Prix. Could drive it for awhile till it got up to normal operating temp. After that it would die again and would not start until cooled off. Turns out it was ignition control module. This part can be taken off and taken to an auto parts store to be tested. Once replaced, no more problems.


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