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Why would two GFICI breaker outlets that are tapped off of an outside GFI on its own line and breaker not work?

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2011-06-07 18:04:17
2011-06-07 18:04:17

GFCI receptacles are extremely sensitive, there are any number of reasons this may not be working for you. The first thing you can do is to make sure that the wire feeding your 2 other outlets off of the outside GFCI are connected to the line side of the device. There are 2 sides to any GFCI: the "line" and the "load" side. The line connections are typically at the bottom, and the load at the top.

The load side is protecting all the downstream receptacles on the circuit. Be sure you have the blacks ("hot" or "line") and whites (neutrals) all on the correct side. Any receptacles downstream don't need to be GFCIs because they will automatically be protected if connected to the load side of the first GFCI.

If you want to use GFCIS for the two new receptacles then you should make sure they are both connected to the line side BEFORE the outside GFCI so they will work independently of the outside one.

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As always, if you are in doubt about what to do, the best advice anyone should give you is to call a licensed electrician to advise what work is needed.

Before you do any work yourself,

on electrical circuits, equipment or appliances,

always use a test meter to ensure the circuit is, in fact, de-energized.

IF YOU ARE NOT ALREADY SURE YOU CAN DO THIS JOB

SAFELY AND COMPETENTLY

REFER THIS WORK TO QUALIFIED PROFESSIONALS.

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Depends on what the outlets are controlling, size of the wire, and size of the breaker.

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If you never plug anything into them, there is no limit. If the total current drawn from all outlets exceeds 20 amps, the breaker will trip.

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You probably blew the breaker for the lights. While usually the lights and outlets in a room are on the same breaker, it isn't always done that way. And you may have blown the light bulbs in the lights.

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Two 20 Amp circuits with the outlets staggered so a different circuit is on two adjacent outlets. Should be GFCI protected.

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You should not run outlets in a home on a 30 amp breaker unless the wiring is 10/2 wiring which is not likely. A home uses either 12/2 wire which requires a 20 amp breaker or 14/2 which requires a 15 amp breaker. If this is in a garage with 10/2 wire and a 30 amp breaker you can easily install a combination of 15 outlets and lights. Really it is the load that counts and not the number of outlets or lights. Add up the load and you will know how many you can install.

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There is probably water in an outside outlet. GFCI outlets monitor the neutral wire, and any moister it detects will cause it to trip out. Also the outlets themselves could have been damaged and need replaceing. The circuit breakers might also be tripped, the GFCI outlet is designed to not reset unless there is power from the breaker. Hope this helps.

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Your home electrical wall outlets current capacity is governed by the breaker that feeds that circuit. In most home situations the wall receptacles are fed with a 15 amp breaker. Dedicated outlets could have a higher ampacity as they are installed for specific appliances or devices. To check your circuit, plug a lamp into the outlet. Start flipping the breakers off. When the lamp goes out that is the breaker for that circuit. Look on the handle of the breaker and it will tell you the capacity of that particular circuit.

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Depends on the size wire used in the circuit. If you wired the circuit with AWG #12 wire on a 20 amp breaker then you can install no more than 12 outlets. If you wired it with AWG #14 wire on a 15 amp breaker then install no more than 9 outlets. This is assuming only outlets are on the circuit and nothing else.

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You should install no more than 9 outlets. If you add a 75 watt light then install no more than 8 outlets and that 1 light.

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A GFCI receptacle can pass it's "protection" to other outlets wired from it. If the GFCI trips, all outlets wired from it will "trip" also. A GFCI tripping will not necessarily trip the circuit breaker in the service panel.

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The breaker panel. Breakers are placed in series with all outlets.

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No. The breaker must protect the circuit components such as wiring, outlets and switches that are connected to the breaker. Therefore if you have a 30 amp circuit as dictated by its components you need to protect it with a 30 amp or less breaker.

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For typical residential house wiring 12 AWG wire is required for a 20 Amp breaker. If you change out the breaker for a 25 A breaker you would have to rewire the circuit with 10 AWG. In that case you could up the breaker to 30 Amps. All outlets and switches should be rated at the same voltage and current as the breaker.

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first be sure to reset the breaker handle to the off position. When a breaker trips the handle goes to a neutral position. After resetting the handle turn it tothe on position. If it trips again there is a short in the circuit. Find out which outlets are not workingand unplug anything that is currently plugged in to the outlets. Reset the breaker and turn it to the on position,if it trips again call a qualified electrician.

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Somewhere you have a loose or broken connection.

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Yes, 4 - 32 watt 48 inch fluorescent lights and 8 outlets can be put on 1 - 20 amp breaker.


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