Will a speeding ticket from another state affect your auto insurance?

Traffic Tickets in another State

The answer is that "It can." It just depends on whether the insurance company checks only your state of residence or not. Most insurance companies will only check your driving record in your state of licensure but they are perfectly capable of checking your driving record in any state or nationally if they so choose.

All States as of 2005 are Required through New Federal Regulation to comply with and make available to all other states reciprocal driver records.

It Is not a matter of a ticket being reported to your state. It is only reported to your state if you fail to take care of it. However, the computer makes your records available to any insurer or state licensing division that cares to check it.

The reciprocal requirement extends to all states being able to automatically suspend or deny a drivers license in any other state until such time as the originating jurisdictions suspension or violation requirements have been satisfied.

The old days of leaving behind unpaid traffic tickets in another state are gone. Information travels at the speed of light.

My advice: Pay the ticket quickly so you don't wind up taking a trip and hiring an attorney trying to get your suspended license reinstated.

If a ticket from another state defaults, your drivers license can now be suspended regardless of which state your licensed in. An unsatisfied traffic judgment in one state can prompt an automatic suspension in another.

The intent and spirit of the movement toward information integration and sharing of the various states agencies along with more efficient enforcement is ultimately to better serve and protect the public.



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Other s

of course it will, you got ticket . So you do the crime you do the time.
It depends on the laws of your home state and whether your state posts out of state tickets. While most do, there are a few exceptions. NY is one.
In general, it always pays to fight an out of state speeding ticket. Never assume that you can just pay the ticket, regardless of what the officer tells you. Check to be sure how it will be posted to your record in your home state and you may also want to check with your insurance agent. In many cases it is cheaper in the long run to hire an attorney to try and get it reduced.
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Out of State Traffic Tickets

I think this response is overly broad. I was pulled over by a Vermont state trooper who specifically told me the ticket wouldn't be reported to my home-state DMV. I think this question needs much more research.
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I got a new york ticket. and then had other violations after that in Pennsylvania. The points in NY Don't transfer into P.A. and I called the DMV and they told me they had no record of out of state tickets. Just my violation in state. But I'm not sure if the insurance companies can see it, That's what I.m Looking Into now myself.

 

Tickets in other States

The answer is: It depends on the state you got the ticket in .
Some states report tickets to each other's DMV or MVD license bureau and some don't. If your state gets info from one of the states that shares, you will most likely see it on your motor vehicle report or If your old tickets go into a default status. Unfortunately, so will your insurance agency next time they take a look at it.

You may want to call your motor vehicle department to ask about it.

Potentially, yes. Your records reflect your entire driving history but it is up to the car insurance companies discretion to decide what they will and will not take into consideration when they determine your rates.