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2012-09-16 21:09:23
2012-09-16 21:09:23

Yes, as long as the car is parked on private property. Cars stored on private property and not "in service" are the same as any other property, If the insured runs into your parked car our your house the insurance will pay.

That's not quite correct. If the damage was intentional, meaning that the driver of the insured car deliberately struck the uninsured parked car, then the At Fault driver's insurance will NOT pay because of a clause in the policy that excludes coverage for 'intentional acts' like criminal activity (which is what this is). So the parked car's owner would have to pursue a civil case against the at fault driver and try to collect against their personal assets.

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If a person is driving a car and he/she is uninsured but the vehicle in which he is driving is registered and insured to another individual, the registered owner is liable for the damages to the other pwesond's vehicle.


It depends on what your saying. Was the intentional act, an act of the insured or was the insured the victim of a crime willfully caused by another. If you are the victim of a crime then your insurance may cover your losses. If so, your loss would not be covered under the liability portion of your own policy though, it would be covered under your comprehensive coverage. A person can not be liable to oneself. Losses and damages that arise from the Intentional acts, Criminal actions, Wanton negligence etc. of the insured are typically excluded from an insurance policy. Insurance is designed to cover unforeseen losses, accidental losses and catastrophic losses not willfully inflicted by the insured. Insurance would never be able affordable to anyone if it was expected to cover willfully inflicted losses of an insured.


"Stacked" refers to uninsured motorist coverage, not to liability or physical damage coverage. In essence, if there are two cars in a household, both with insured motorist coverage, the uninsured motorist limits of the cars can be "stacked"--added together. Naturally, this will only make a difference if the severity of the injury and the clarity of the liability is such as to warrant that size of a payment to the insured. Keep in mind that the assessment of damages by an insurer in an uninsured motorist claim is similar to that done by a liability insurer in a third-party claim. Note also that some states have "anti-stacking" statutes which prohibit the stacking of ininsured motorist limits.


In most cases if you are fully insured then your insurance will pay for the uninsured driver's car. However if it is only a third party insurance then most likely you have no cover if it is your fault. However it depends on the insurance company and the policy that you signed.



Uninsured motorist coverage pays damages for bodily injuries when the at-fault driver or owner of a vehicle has no bodily injury liability coverage. It pays an amount up to the amount purchased by the insured, and is generally not a required coverage. In those states that utilize a comparative negligence rule of determining fault for a collision, the amount that the inured party can recover is reduced by the amount of liability attributable to him/her. In that respect, it operates similarly to the evaluation of the injury and damages if the at-fault party did have bodily injury liability coverage. Underinsured motorist coverage serves essentially the same purpose. However, it is triggered when the at-fault party's bodily injury liability coverage is less than the injured party's uninsured motorist coverage. Further, in order to be triggered, the "value" of the injury must exceed the liability coverage of the at-fault party.


The insurance status of the victim's vehicle is irrelevant. The at-fault insurance company will pay for your damages whether your car is insured or not.


your insurance contract will say something like, ''promptly report all losses'' you should report it to your company..........it doesn't matter that other vehicle is uninsured.......if you are liable you are liable, and owe for his damage, whether or not he is insured......


third party liability coverage is personal liability coverage that protects the customer from damages they incur due to the wrongful acts of others when the liable person is uninsured or underinsured. The coverage is designed to cover bodily injury, property damage and personal injury resulting from occurrences not involving an auto in which a liable third party is at fault, but is uninsured or underinsured. For example, this would cover a policyholder if a dog attacks his child and the dog owner is not insured or is underinsured, or if a policyholder is injured at a party on a deck that collapses and the homeowner is not insured or is underinsured.


Depends on the state.. and if the state is a "no-fault" state. Typically, in a no fault state, the person at fault pays for damages incurred. In a no-fault state (such as Michigan), each person pays for their own damages.


Collision insurance will cover the damages to your vehicle- no matter who is at fault. Uninsured coverage is used if the other vehicle is at fault for the accident and you and/or anyone in your car is injured. This coverage will typically pay for related medical bills, loss wages, and general damages (i.e pain and suffering). Liability = Other vehicle damage Injuries to driver/passenger in other vehicle Injuries to passengers in your vehicle if you are at fault Collision/Comprehensive = Cover damages to your car Uninsured/Under-insured = Injuries to you or your passengers when another vehicle is at fault and does not have insurance or has minimum coverage


Uninsured motorist coverage is a type of first-party auto insurance that compensates one if he/she is injured in a collision due to the negligence of someone else who does not have bodily injury liability coverage. Essentially, it pays the same sort of damages as the at-fault party's bodily injury liability coverage would have paid if it existed. It only pays for compensable bodily injuries--not property damage. In many States, uninsured motorist coverage must be offered in the same amount as one's liability coverage. However, the insured usually has the right to select lower limits or reject it altogether.


what damages? to the car? if the car is insured that insurer (assuming coverage is available) will handle that damage, if you mean you were injured driving an insured vehicle....it depends on a lot of things...more info regarding status of drivers, vehicle, fact of loss, etc.....and perhaps i can be of more assistance...


If you are insured for 'full coverage' or possibly 'uninsured motorist', yes. In a standard liability policy you would probably not be covered.


Uninsured motoristUninsured Motorist coverage (which is required coverage in many states) covers injuries that the driver and occupants of a car sustain when the at-fault vehicle was not insured for liability coverage. UM does not cover the physical damage to the vehicle. UMPD (uninsured motorist property damage), where available, covers that physical damage. UMPD is essentially similar to collision coverage, which is first party insurance that pays regardless of fault, subject to a deductible.Uninsured motorist coverage pays essentially the same type of benefits (such as for pain and suffering) as the liability insurance of the other party would pay if the at-fault party had liability insurance. Additionally, the uninsured motorist insurer will generally evaluate a claimant's injuries in much the same way as a liability insurer would, and the claimant is subject to a reduction in damages for contributory or comparative negligence according to the law of the jurisdiction.


There are many questions to be asked with this question. Are you saying an uninsured driver, driving a vehicle with no insurance? First of all you hope that the insured drivers insurance company accepts liability for the damage. If they don't then your only hope is to get a lawyer and take them to court. If you can't afford a lawyer then small claims court may be an option. For a bit of advise, don't drive uninsured.


The insured and the insured professional are one and the same.


P.S. The insured driver is found at-fault with witnesses. The uninsured driver is worried if his license will be suspended or facing any penalty for driving the his parent's INSURED car.


The insured drivers uninsured motorist coverage should take care of it. Doesn't matter if property is private or not.


The at fault driver always has the primary liability for the damages they cause in an accident. (The guy who rams the other guy).


If the uninsured driver had the permission of the insured driver to operate the vehicle then NOTHING will happen to the uninsured driver. In fact, in this case he or she is not an uninsured driver at all. The insurance follows the vehicle first, the driver second.


It depends on the concrete contractor. Some of them will be insured while others will be uninsured.


If the accident was caused by the uninsured driver than the uninsured driver is definitely still responsible.




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