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Answered 2013-04-23 09:44:46

yes you have to give the virus......

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a computer virus is a hacking software that you download on your computer anti-virus is the software that gets rid of viruses


No. But if your downloading a "hack" or "bot" for runescape it will probably end up hacking your runescape account.


Downloading software from the internet can cause viruses, but is not a given. If the software is from a trusted source, and the user has adequate virus protection on their computer, then an infection is unlikely.


Someone can delete a virus that one receives from downloading games software by using antivirus software, for the most part. It will depend on how one got the virus and the severity of its infection in someone's computer. An antivirus program such as Avast or MalwareBytes can assist in the removal.



risk: downloading a virus safeguard: download antivirus software


Your computer may get a virus many ways:Visiting harmful sitesDownloading unsafe filesOpening anonymous emailsNot having Anit-Virus softwareIf you ever get a virus download and install an AV software or MBAM.


Scanning all email attachments with anti-virus software will help prevent downloading viruses and other malicious code


Computers may obtain viruses in a number of different ways, including downloading music or movies, downloading pornagraphic material, or even opening an untrustworthy email. If the game software has a virus, then it is absolutely possible for the computer to become infected by downloading a game.


There are various ways which you could try to solve the recycler virus. You could try downloading a piece of anti-malware software.


No. Sometime in 2010, all the antivirus programs started to say it was a virus. It is a hacking program, when it comes down to it. It sounds like the antivirus is the problem, not the download.


It's okay to download some software like manycam 2.4 for example but some hacking software can give u a virus and see all of your passwords.


worms are viruses that don't require user to user for access,as in from downloading games or software downloads.


The software PC Security Shield is an anti-virus and anti-hacking program that you can put on your computer. It will protect your computer from hackers.


There are many ways one can remove a trojan virus from one's computer. One can remove a trojan virus from their computer by downloading a virus removal software such as Sophos.


You can scan your computer for virus without downloading any software. You can do it online. visit... http://www.sacatech.com/index.html


Yes, the application or document you are downloading can contain a virus or cookie embedded in it.



going onto a site,clicking a pop-up, or downloading software


A virus doesn't cause hacking. If anything hacking causes virus's. Sometimes a hacker may put a virus on a system to cover up his presence. Once a virus is on a system, it usually gets the blame for any strange activity.


A computer virus is a malicus software that enters your computer via email or downloading files. For more information visit:http:/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_virus dont worry, the addres is not a virus. A virus can basically destroy your computer.


It is important to have some form of anti-virus installed when downloading anything from the internet. There is a free one available called ESET.


downloading limewire software does not give you a virus...the files that are downloaded from limewire like downloading music can give you a virus, that's why I do not use limewire or frostwire or any file-sharing websites, because my past experience with file-sharing websites and limewire was not pleasant.


No, it is not. Limewire does not offer virus protection. The only way I'd go about downloading ANYTHING off of Limewire is if I had good anti-virus software.



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