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It could be. The lowest level of Article III courts in the U.S. is called United States District Court, and the judges are typically referred to as United States District Court Judges. However, many states also call some level of their courts district courts as well, and those judges would commonly be referred to as district judges as well.

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12y ago
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13y ago

Judges and justices who serve in US District Court, US Court of International Trade, US Court of Appeals Circuit Courts, and the Supreme Court of the United States are appointed under Article III of the Constitution, which provides that they may serve during good behavior (for life, if they aren't impeached and convicted). This applies only to the four courts that make up the Judicial Branch of the federal government:

  • US District Courts
  • US Court of International Trade
  • US Court of Appeals Circuit Courts
  • Supreme Court of the United States

Other federal judges are appointed for shorter, fixed terms of office, typically 15 years with ability to be reappointed when that term expires.

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12y ago

pretty much, however federal judges are judges in the national government and handle national issues, state judges are judges in the state government and only handle state issues. The only difference really is they are both on separate levels of the government.

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14y ago

The term "supreme court" refers to the highest appellate court in within a particular judicial system (federal or state).

Federal courts are those that hear cases involving matters of federal or US constitutional law; State courts are those that hear cases involving matters of state statutes and state constitutional law. "Federal" and "State" are the general designations of the two court systems within the United States.

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13y ago

Yes, but this only applies to Article III (constitutional) judges. Federal justices who serve on the courts listed below can remain on the bench until they resign, retire or die in office, as long as they maintain "good behavior." If judges or justices commit offenses that could be considered crimes, ethics violations, or detrimental to the US government in general, they may be removed though impeachment by the US House of Representatives and conviction by the US Senate. The removal criteria is the same as that used for the President.

  • US District Courts
  • US Court of International Trade
  • US Court of Appeals Circuit Courts
  • Supreme Court of the United States

Article I federal judges, which preside over courts of limited jurisdiction, such as the US Court of Claims, US Tax Court, US Bankruptcy Court, US Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, government agency appeals, etc., do not enjoy this privilege because they are not part of the Judicial Branch, but of the Legislative Branch.

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11y ago

a federal judge presides over the lower courts, such as district courts. But the justice presides in the supreme court, the high court in the land, and is appointed by the president, and approved by the legislative branch.

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15y ago

No. A Supreme Court Justice is a federal judge, but there are hundreds of federal judges and only nine are on the Supreme Court.

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Q: Are federal judges appointed for life the same as US Supreme Court justices?
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Related questions

Federal judges are appointed for what the same as the justices of the Supreme Court?

Life


Federal judges are appointed for the same as the justices of the Supreme Court?

True (:


True or false federal judges are appointed for life the same as the justices of the supreme court?

True


True or false Federal judges are appointed for life the same as the justices of the Supreme Court.?

True


In the checks and balances of the 1787 constitution federal judges?

The first federal judges (justices of the Supreme Court) were appointed as a result of the Judiciary Act of 1789. There were no federal judges in 1787; therefore, there were no checks and balances to worry about.


What is the difference between how federal judges are nominated vs how supreme court justices are nominated?

The process of nominating federal judges and Supreme Court justices is similar, but there are a few key differences. Federal judges are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate, while Supreme Court justices go through the same process but with heightened scrutiny and public attention. Additionally, Supreme Court justices serve lifetime appointments, while federal judges may serve either lifetime or fixed terms depending on the specific court.


What level of the federal court system are the judges called justices?

Federal judges on the US Supreme Court are called justices.


Why are supreme court justices and federal judges appointed and not elected?

Because if they were elected the judges might not make fair decisions. They might favor the people who voted for them


Only federal justices and judges are what?

are appointed to the court by the president


Do federal justices and judges have the authority to choose who their replacements will be?

No. Federal judges are appointed by the President with confirmation by the Senate.


How are judges appionted in the US?

supreme court justices are appointed by the president' state judges are either elected or appointed by the governor


Are Supreme court justices only able to be appointed by the president of the US?

All federal judges are nominated by the president, subject to confirmation by the Senate.