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13th ammendment

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Q: What is the first instance of the word slave or slavery in the constitution?
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The Confederate Constitution called for the end of the slave trade but not?

(Slavery)


Who was the president when African American slavery started?

The first slave arrived in 1619 well before the revolution and the constitution, so there was no president when American slavery began.


In the Constitution of 1787 - the unamended document - how many times do the words slave and slavery appear?

never...slavery 1st appeared in the constitution in the 13th amendment


How are slaves and slavery referred to in the Constitution?

A slave was 3/4 of a person in the constitution when population was counted for the house.


Is the word slavery ever mentioned in the constitution?

no, they said words that refer to the word slave but never just "slave"


The issue of slavery at the constitution convention was actually about?

The constitution should prohibit the states from participating in the international slave trade.


Which was these was still a problem after the US constitution was written?

slavery and the slave trade were still legal


Which of these was still a problem after the US Constitution was writtin?

Slavery and the slave traid were still legal.


What was still a problem after the US Constitution was written?

Slavery and the slave trade were still legal.


Did the US Constitution legitimated slavery?

From the time the American colonies first began to form the Union, several questions were raised regarding the relationship of the Constitution of the United States and the institution of slavery. A close look at the document created in Philadelphia in 1787 will reveal the ambiguous language pertaining to the holding of slaves, since the words "slave" and "slavery" were never used in the Constitution. The Framers debated over the extent to which slavery would be included, permitted, or prohibited in the Constitution. In the end, they created a document of compromise that represented the interests of the nation as they knew it and predicted it to be in the future. Explaining the Framers' and the Constitution's understanding of slavery requires a careful look at the three clauses which deal with the issue. An analysis of the three-fifths compromise, the slave trade clause, and the fugitive-slave law all point to the Framers' intentions in the creation of the Constitution and prove that it neither authorized nor prohibited slavery. The first indication of slavery in the Constitution appears in Article I, Section 2. This is the three-fifths clause that explains the apportionment of representation and taxation. It reads:


What was the constitution's original position on slavery?

The constitution stated that it could not affect the slave trade until 1808. That's pretty much it.


Why are the words slave or slavery NOT in the Constitution?

The convention delegates did not want to upset the sensibilities of the people in the Northern states.