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That depends upon which peer: http://www.parliament.uk/about/contacting/lord.cfm says that "Many Peers do not have public email addresses". I'd advise you see this list: http://www.parliament.uk/directories/house_of_lords_information_office/alphabetical_list_of_members.cfm for those who have websites and go from there. Or send a snail mail (see the first link)

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โˆ™ 2009-03-15 16:38:56
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Q: What is the email address of a peer at the House of Lords?
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What do you call an independent member of the house of lords?

Peer


What is a hereditary Peer?

Hereditary Peers inherit their title and consist of five ranks: Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount and Baron. Peerages may become extinct or fall into abeyance, but so long as there is an heir, the title will continue. Stage one of the House of Lords Act 1999 removed the entitlement of most of the hereditary Peers to sit and vote in the House of Lords, and of the 92 hereditary Peers who retain their seat in the Lords, 75 were elected by their fellow hereditary Peers.


What is a peerage and do they still exist in the UK today?

A peerage is basically a system of titles of the nobility in the United Kingdom, part of the British honour system. The term is used to refer to a collection of titles, and individually refer to a specific title. The Sovereign is the one who can grant or take away titles from a peer - they are considered the "fount of honor", or the head of state. They have the power and influence over these kind of decisions. If someone neither has a title or is part of a member of a peer's family, then they are also known as a "commoner". There are two types of peer: hereditary and life. Hereditary peers are the true British aristocracy and have less representation in parliament than life peers who have been elevated by the government because of their birth, usefulness in politics, the law, religion, the community or industry. The British Aristocracy, mainly the life peers, are appointed by the government or as Law Lords, senior judges, plus a small number of Bishops who also sit in the Lords have a ruling power in the legislature of the House of Lords, the upper chamber of Parliament. The House of Lords still has considerable power & influence in UK politics and are seen as a necessary moderator.


When did Guy Fawkes try to blow up the Tower of London?

Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament (where Parliament sits) and not the Tower of London (which is a castle and prison at the other end of London) on November 5th 1605. They were hoping to kill many of the Protestant nobility in the house of Lords but was exposed when one of the gang warned a Catholic peer to stay away.


How was Guy Fawkes caught?

One of the Catholic gang who intended to blow up the (mainly Protestant) House of Lords sent a letter to a Catholic Peer to warn him. He became suspicious and a search of the cellars was carried out. The gunpowder was discovered and Guy Fawkes captured when he came to explode it.

Related questions

What do you call an independent member of the house of lords?

Peer


What is a sentence for the word baron?

A Baron is a British peer in the House of Lords of the lowest rank.


Who is the only hereditary honor which is not a peerage?

A Baronet is a hereditary honour and is not a peer and not eligible to sit in the House of Lords.


What is the difference between life peer and hereditary peer?

members of the house of lords peers are not elected at present . untill 1999 they were mosty hereditary peers before them


Can persons with a knighthood vote in the house of lords or house of commons?

Only MPs vote in the House of Commons and only peers vote in the House of Lords. A knight may also be an MP or a peer but has no voting privileges because of a knighthood only.


Are the people in the House of Lords elected?

No, they inherit the title of Lord as nobles, and along with it the right to membership in the House of Lords. Members of the House of Commons are elected - they are "commoners", NOT nobles, like the Lords. Once a person is elevated by being named an hereditary peer ( a noble with a title his eldest son inherits) he is eligible for the House of Lords. Mere knights are not eligible.


What is the difference between life peers and hereditary peers Lords Temporal and Lords Spiritual?

A Life Peer is someone who has a noble title but it is not hereditary- the title does not automatically go to his heir when he dies.A Hereditary Peer is someone who has a noble title but it is hereditary- the title will automatically go to his heir (typically his oldest son) upon his death.The Lords Temporal are Peers (Life or Hereditary) who are sitting members of the House of Lords in Parliament.The Lords Spiritual are high ranking bishops from the Anglican Church who also members of the House of Lords.


LimeWire ip address?

Its a peer to peer NETWORK it doesn't have an IP address


In the British Parliament how did members of the House of Lords get their positions?

by inheriting themThis is wrong. Some do inherit their titles, but in fact the vast majority are created as life peers by the reigning sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister. It is a very common misconception that Members of the House of Lords all inherit their titles. An example of a Life peer is Lord Peter Mandelson of Foy. An example of a hereditary peer is Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton.This answer is correct the British Parliament members of the House of Lords got their positions by inheriting them.


In British Parliament how did members of the house of lords get the position?

by inheriting themThis is wrong. Some do inherit their titles, but in fact the vast majority are created as life peers by the reigning sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister. It is a very common misconception that Members of the House of Lords all inherit their titles. An example of a Life peer is Lord Peter Mandelson of Foy. An example of a hereditary peer is Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton.This answer is correct the British Parliament members of the House of Lords got their positions by inheriting them.


In British parliament how did the members of the House of Lords get their positions?

by inheriting themThis is wrong. Some do inherit their titles, but in fact the vast majority are created as life peers by the reigning sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister. It is a very common misconception that Members of the House of Lords all inherit their titles. An example of a Life peer is Lord Peter Mandelson of Foy. An example of a hereditary peer is Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton.This answer is correct the British Parliament members of the House of Lords got their positions by inheriting them.


What is a cross-bench peer?

Cross-bench peers are peers appointed to the House of Lords not to support a political party, but to add their specialist knowledge or expertise. They sit on the cross bench, not on the party benches, and are not subject to the party whip. The Law Lords are included in the cross-bench peers. Full information is available at the web site of the House of Lords.

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