Benjamin Franklin

This category is for questions about the multi-talented Benjamin Franklin, who managed to be a scientist, politician, and just about everything in-between.

Asked in Science, Biology, Benjamin Franklin, Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages

Who was Rosalind Franklin?

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Rosalind Franklin was a distinguished scientist whose research played a pivotal role in discovering the structure of DNA. However, she wasn’t widely credited for that discovery until fairly recently. She earned her PhD in physical chemistry from Cambridge University in 1945, and she did her pivotal DNA research at King’s College between 1951 and 1953. The controversy over her role in the discovery of DNA’s structure stems from the fact that Maurice Wilkins, another researcher at King’s College, showed Franklin’s images of DNA to James Watson, another scientist trying to create a DNA model. Watson and his research partner Francis Crick published a paper about it shortly after, and Wilkins, Watson, and Crick all went on to receive a Nobel Prize for the double helix DNA model. Franklin was not recognized. She spent the rest of her career studying viruses at Birkbeck College, and she passed away in 1958.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Benjamin Franklin

How did Benjamin Franklin feel about work?

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For a man that accomplished as much as he did I think it would be safe to say the Benjamin Franklin had a great fondness for work.
Asked in Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography

Who wrote the autobiography of Benjamin Franklin?

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Benjamin Franklin wrote The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.
Asked in Benjamin Franklin, Founding Fathers

What did Benjamin Franklin feel?

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Benjamin Franklin felt many of the same things people of his time and modern times felt. These include anger, enjoyment, satisfaction, and sadness.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Benjamin Franklin

What was the name of Benjamin Franklin?

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The name of Benjamin Franklin was, strangely enough, Benjamin Franklin.
Asked in Benjamin Franklin, Stamp Collecting (Philately)

What is the value of a Benjamin Franklin blue green 1 cent stamp?

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The exact value of a Benjamin Franklin blue green 1 cent stamp would actually be dependent upon a number of factors. Some of these factors would be the age and condition of the stamp.
Asked in Benjamin Franklin, Air Guns and Air Rifles

Benjamin Franklin air gun model 317 H11074?

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Manufactured between ( First Variation ) plunger under the barrel 1934 - 1940. (Second Variation ) Pump under the Barrel 1940-1969
Asked in Benjamin Franklin, Air Guns and Air Rifles, BB Guns

Benjamin Franklin pellet bb gun value?

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In order to give you a value you will have to identify it first, Benjamin air gun has made several air guns over the years. I need to know the model and condition of the air gun first to give an accurate value to the gun. Also is it Pellet or BB or both. model#3120 good condition --------------------------------------------------------------------- The model 312 is part of the 310 series of air rifles. The 310 was a BB rifle. The 312 is a .22 caliber pellet air rifle and the 317 is a .177 caliber air rifle. They were made between 1940 and 1969. In good condition, and working, it is worth between $55 - $75
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, Politics and Government, Benjamin Franklin

What important things did Benjamin Franklin do?

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Ben was 1. Writer 2. Editor of the declaration/ signed the declaration 3. Inventor of Franklin stove, bifocals, lightening rods 4. Diplomat 5. At the constitutional convention 6. Began schools 7. Started the first fire department in Philadelphia 8. Opened the Philadelphia library 9. Left a bank account for Philadelphia that couldn't be opened until 1999.
Asked in Benjamin Franklin

What was ben Franklins field of study?

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Ben Franklin was a scientist who studied
Asked in Benjamin Franklin, Air Guns and Air Rifles

How do you repair a Benjamin Franklin model 342?

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Crosman owns Benjamin. Crosman offers a service to locate air gun repair shops that repair older air guns. See the link below
Asked in Benjamin Franklin, Air Guns and Air Rifles

How old is your Benjamin Franklin model number 342?

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They were made between 1969- 1992. If you give me the serial number I may be able to give you the exact year.
Asked in Inventions, Benjamin Franklin

Who invented the glasses case?

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nobody cares! even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because noboeven if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!dy else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!even if someone did, it wouldn't matter because nobody else does!
Asked in Benjamin Franklin

What was Benjamin Franklin suggesting about the government when he said that a man whose only property was a jackass would lose his right to vote if the jackass died?

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Ben Franklin did indeed say it: Today a man owns a jackass worth 50 dollars and he is entitled to vote; but before the next election the jackass dies. The man in the mean time has become more experienced, his knowledge of the principles of government, and his acquaintance with mankind, are more extensive, and he is therefore better qualified to make a proper selection of rulers-but the jackass is dead and the man cannot vote. Now gentlemen, pray inform me, in whom is the right of suffrage? In the man or in the jackass? And what he meant was that it was absurd for the states to require a man to own property in order to have the right to vote -- which was typically the case.
Asked in Consumer Electronics, History of Singapore, Energy Conservation, Benjamin Franklin

What would happen if there was no electricity?

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There are two ways of looking at the question, "What would happen if there was no electricity". First.... What if electricity didn't exist? Well, the universe literally would not exist as we know it, because electricity is streams of electrons, and without electrons, compounds (and thus most matter) wouldn't exist. If electricity (electromagnetism) did not exist the universe would not exist, since EM forces are an integral component of the (commonly accepted) standard model. Second... What if humans didn't know how to use electricity? We didn't know how to use it for most of our history, so I imagine we'd revert to a mid-1800's society, where machines were steam powered and we had to read for personal entertainment. We wouldn't be able to watch TV, go on the computer, talk on the phone. We'd have to play games outside, and use our imaginations more, like they did in historical times. Parents wouldn't be able to punish by taking away computers or cell phones because neither would run anyway. Imagine cold showers or baths; no microwave; no cold drinks in summer; even worse no air conditioning and no cars (Cars need electricity to run the fuel ignition system.) One could heat water on the stove (probably a wood stove, hot, sweaty, and smokey, why many old kitchens were walled off from the rest of the house). But, you didn't prohibit using Natural Gas for Hot water, or for the stove. One can even run an absorption refrigerator on Natural Gas or Propane, or anything that would run a compressor could run a freon based refrigerator. With a little imagination one could use a solar hot water heater too. Transport would be steam-driven, animal-driven or human-powered. You'd have a bicycle, a horse-drawn carriage or you'd just walk everywhere you went, and you'd go long distances by train. By now someone would have invented the horseless carriage, which would run on either a small boiler or maybe a diesel engine--diesels don't need electricity to run, and you can rope-start them if you have to. Remember the old cars had cranks out front. You'd get outside rain or shine and pull on the crank and hope it started... and pull again. Presumably this would also work with Diesel engines without any electricity, but the increased compression would make them a pain to crank to start. Glow plugs, of course, wouldn't work so you'd have to compensate with higher compression. I believe some Diesel engines use pneumatic starters, or perhaps you could use a pony-engine setup like the old caterpillars. Also, no radio in the car. No electric fans. Probably we would still be using carbide lights on the fenders. Everyone dreams about riding horses, right? That would likely be a big part of life Lighting would be by flames--candles or lanterns. You'd communicate via the mails, or you'd go visiting. Visiting was a very popular form of entertainment in the 1800s, and there were many social protocols--you dressed formally to do it, you made an appointment to visit, you left calling cards in a basket at the front door, and you had a special sitting room that was only used for visiting. You'd entertain yourself by playing games, but you'd play with other people. You'd also go to dances, you'd go to church (people weren't really any more religious then than they are now, but everyone went to church because in a lot of places church was the main form of entertainment). Food was generally fresh, or canned, and locally-grown. Meats were almost always smoked. Did you ever read in old Christmas stories about how the children got an orange for a gift? Oranges were special because they were hard to transport, so you might see one a year. If you wanted to see a play, you went to a theater. If you wanted to hear music, you went to a concert on the town square, or you had someone in the family who could play, or you knew how to play yourself. A lot of people had pianos or harpsichords, and for the non-rich there were guitars, banjos, fiddles, harmonicas and mandolins. Work was all manual. You made things, or you wrote on ledger paper. There wouldn't be any more thirty-second conversations. Women didn't just run over to a neighbor's house for a little while--if you wanted to do that, you'd talk to your neighbor across the hedgerow at the edge of your property. If you spent a couple of hours dressing, styling your hair and applying makeup, you'd spend half the night in conversation. And you'd LIKE it! You also wouldn't be there by yourself--usually people would gather in groups in parlors (living rooms), and discuss all sorts of things. No escalators, no elevators, and a lot more would be done by hand. There probably would be a lot less incidence of obesity, and less incidence of adult onset type 2 diabetes. Medicine, of course, would be simpler with no MRIs, PET Scans, CAT scans, Maybe simple X-Rays but, no Ultra Sounds. No knowing the sex of your child before it is born. No hand held calculators. There were mechanical calculators available, for quite some time, but they were overly large. Lastly, you wouldn't have a computer to be reading this. It would either be typed with a manual typewriter (ker-thunk), handwritten by candle-light or transcribed by monks in some monastery. There actually were some early mechanical computing devices... but for a mechanical computer device capable of doing what a modern laptop computer can do, think of something the size of New York City, and still no video screen to look at. People would go to bed to sleep at dark (about 8pm) because there isn't much to do after dark, by candlelight, in shadows. There'd be no outside lights so outdoor activities would be difficult or dangerous.
Asked in Benjamin Franklin

How many kids did Benjamin Franklin have?

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His children were: William Franklin Francis Folger Franklin Sarah Franklin Bache
Asked in Home Electricity, Cooking Equipment , Benjamin Franklin

How does a electirc stove work?

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how does a electric stove work???????????? how does a electric stove work????????????