Horses

Since man first domesticated the horse around 4000 BC, it has proved to be quite useful and important in the progress of civilization. This category contains information about wild horses, the varieties of breeds, colors, and the history of horses, as well as other general information pertaining to these stunning and magnificent animals.

Asked in Care of Horses, Horses

How long is chincoteague island?

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Chincoteague Island is 7 miles long
Asked in Horses

Is riding horses hard?

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Riding horses is farely easy, you just need to have a trained horse with a little training for yourself.
Asked in Horses

What does horse sperm taste?

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a bit salty but better taste than human sperms.
Asked in Care of Horses, Horses

Where do mustang horses sleep?

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they sleep in the mountains or were ever they can find a place to sleep
Asked by Selina Corwin in Zebras, Horses, Animal Life

Is a zebra a type of horse?

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No, zebras are not technically a type of horse, though they are both equines. Both belong to the genus Equus, which also includes donkeys, but they are separate species within that genus. Sometimes, these three different species are referred to as the "horse family," but that's not a scientific distinction. Horses and zebras have different amounts of chromosomes; therefore, they very rarely have offspring that can also reproduce, which is one of the requirements for considering different animals part of the same species. To top it all off, zebras actually resemble donkeys more closely than they do horses. Incidentally, when zebras and donkeys reproduce, the offspring is called a zonkey, which is unrelated but quite delightful.
Asked in Horses

What novel idea did the people of Chincoteague have for controlling the number of wild horses?

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In 1925, they held the first annual roundup of the Assateague (Chincoteague) ponies. This is called the Chincoteague pony swim. During this, they swim a herd of the ponies across the Assateague Channel (inbetween Assateague Island and Chincoteague Island). When they reach the shore of Chincoteague, the ponies are put in pens. Then, before they swim them back to Assateague Island, they hold an auction to sell some of the ponies. This helps to decrease the population of the wild ponies. The money that they raise from these auctions helps to fund the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Department, whose firemen are the ones who round up and swim the ponies across the channel.
Asked in Horses

When did horse riding start?

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Riding started millions of years ago, before the spanish brought horse to America. The explorers rode these animals in battle and soon the Indians were intreaged. So, basicly before 1498
Asked in Care of Horses, Horses

What is the scientific classification of a horse mustang?

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The scientific classification of a Mustang (horse) is the same as any other horse like animal: Equus.
Asked in Cows and Cattle, Horses, The Difference Between

What are the differences between cattle and horses?

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There are many differences between cattle and horses: Cattle: Blocky body Heavier, broader and thicker neck Have dewlaps Have cloven hooves with dewclaws Head is wider, broader and heavier than horses Cattle use their heads to fight each other; cows can't kick, bite or rear up like horses can, instead they use brute strength to master each other over kicking and biting like horses do Tail switch is long with a little tuft of hair on the end Tend to have a much straighter top-line than horses Hold their head level with their top-line Males and females easier to distinguish than with horses Can be generally tougher and less delicate than horses are They are known to survive in tough conditions, and still are raised as such on ranches that require cows to be able to thrive in tough conditions. Shorter, "stubby" and bigger legs True ruminants, with four-chambered stomach Ears on the side of the head, not on top No incisors on the top jaw Males not born with canines or cuspids Shorter gestation period (only 9 months long) Four quarters in the udder, unlike mares with only 2 udder halves Walk at a slower pace Wider muzzle, inflexible nose and lips, nose has sweat glands on it Able to have horns or not Bulls' penis is housed at on the middle of the belly; longitude of testes perpendicular to underbelly, and often hang down low The penis comes at a tip, similar to the writing-end tip of a pen or pencil Cows go in heat on a pre-determined schedule, bull present or not Cows eat by wrapping their thick rough tongue around a mouthful of grass, pulling it in, biting it, then swallowing. Cattle feces are in large pats (called cow-pies) with a lot less defined plant particles in it; Cattle are more efficient herbivores than horses Reach sexual maturity faster (heifers reach puberty at 15 months of age: a filly not until she's around 2 years of age) Mixed herd structure, ability to have more than one bull in the herd without much fighting Slower and less agile than a horse is Not so if you have to get away from an angry bull or momma cow! Considered primarily as livestock because they are commonly used for meat or milk. Harder to train because of lesser intelligence, and thus harder to gain trust and respect from such animals. Horses: No dewlaps No horns Uni-hoof (or single toe) with no dewclaws present Longer, thinner legs Finer, arched neck Ears set on top of head, often smaller, and a bit more flexible than cattle ears Finer body, not as blocky as cattle are, with smoother lines. More curved top-line, with more defined withers than cows Tail comprised of many long hairs that often start from the base of the tail to the ground Presence of a mane of hair, often different colour (as well as tail) from the rest of the body except in sorrels and most pintos and paints Incisors found on top and bottom of the mouth Males born with canines or cuspids Kick with both their hind feet, bite, nip and rear when fighting or playing ability to lay ears back flat against their heads Mares have 11 month gestation period and a less predictable parturition schedule than cows do Flexible, tender nose and lips Often holds head higher than rest of body Mares "wink" when in heat, cows don't Mares often begin estrus when in presence of a stallion Stallion's penis is tucked in between the back legs; longitude of testes parallel with underline and don't hang as low as bulls do Penis is similar to a human male's with a "stubby" head at the tip. Bulls lack this. Horses graze by gathering grass by the lips then chopping it off with their incisors Pseudo-ruminants, with huge ceca on the large intestine instead of a four-chambered stomach To extract enough nutrition from grass they must eat virtually non-stop Feces is large and round often with large plant particles Reach sexual maturity slower than cattle (filly reaches puberty at ~24 months of age, whereas a heifer will reach puberty between 12 and 18 months of age, depending on the breed) Much more intelligent than cattle are, and thus tend to get themselves in more trouble than cattle! Enables the ability for people to gain the trust and respect of the horse to be trained to ride and to work or participate in various equine events that tests a horse and rider's skills. Horses can be easily trained to jump for show jumping, rope, herd livestock, or do various tricks for entertainment. Most people do not wish to think of a horse as a source of food. Much different story with cattle. Four gaits: walk, trot, canter and gallop. Cattle only have three: walk, trot and gallop. Prone to spook and stampede more than cattle, especially if not trained Herd structure comprises of several mares with one stallion. Other stallions not with a herd of mares form a bachelor herd. If more than one stallion is in with a herd of mares, there will be LOTS of fighting, often until one stallion is either killed or too injured to fight any more. A stallion will also not stand to have a gelding in his herd either, unlike a bull would with steers. Mare usually the boss of the herd: stallion acts as a source of protection Horses are lighter, faster and prefer to flee than fight. Less hardy and more delicate than cattle are Except for feral horses and wild mustangs, horses are "spoiled" much more than cattle are. Considered primarily a companion animal, not livestock. This is a case where a picture is worth a thousand words. See links below.
Asked in Horses

Person who shoes horses?

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A person who puts shoes on horses is called a farrier.
Asked in Horses

What do American paint horses eat?

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The same as any other horses. They drink water and eat hay, grass, oats/grain, apples, carrots, sugar cubes, and horse treats.
Asked in Care of Horses, Horses, Horse Tack

15 main parts of a horse?

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Head Eyes Mouth Nose / Snout Ears Poll Barrel Hoofs Mane Tail Cannon Bone Foreleg Back Rump "privates" There are a lot more than that, I just named a bunch that I thought of off the top of my head.
Asked in Horses, Rodeo Events

What relationship is there between a mustang and a rodeo?

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A mustang is a (horse) and a person rides it.
Asked in Horses

What is a male horse called?

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A stallion is an intact (not castrated; retains his testicles) male horse used for breeding. A gelding is a male horse (often adult) that has been castrated. A young male horse less than four years old is called a colt. A horse's father is called its sire. A stallion. a baby male = colt a grown male that's breeding = stallion a grown male that's not breeding = gelding
Asked in Care of Horses, Horses

How much does a horse's skeleton weigh?

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The average horse weighs around 1100 pounds. However, this is with muscle, skin, fat, and hair. Only about 40% of the horse's total weight is the skeleton.
Asked in Horses, US Army History and Traditions

What do you call a person who looks after cavalry horses?

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A hostler or ostler is a groom or stableman, who is employed in a stable to take care of horses. They might be treated for injuries or illnesses by a veterinarian, and the condition of their feet and shoes was handled by a farrier. However, day to day care of the cavalry mount was by the soldier that rode the horse. A knight would be aided by his squire.
Asked in Horses

Do horses have cutie marks?

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No on lf it's mlp
Asked in Horses

How do horses grow fur?

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Horses don't have fur they have hair
Asked in Horses

How did the size of the head changes as the horse evolved?

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The horses head began to elongate and the eyes moved even more towards the side of the skull. This allowed horses to switch from browsing leaves to eating the tall tough grasses and still be able to watch for predators.