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Madison Square Garden

Located in midtown Manhattan, Madison Square Garden is a famous sporting arena.

857 Questions

Does one person own the land where Madison Square Garden stands and receive approximately 385K per month?

Where did the $385,000 come from? Is this just an arbitrary figure?

Whatever. Have you done a search on "Madison Square Garden"? You might be able to find out who currently owns it or the ground it sits on if you look for an article about the history of the Garden.

One half of the land under Madison Square Garden is owned by Vornado Realty Trust (CEO Steven Roth).

Interestingly, Vornado Realty Trust is also the developer for the new building at One Beacon Court (between 58th and 59th streets and Lexington and Thrid Avenues)on the site where Alexanders Department store used to be and which is now the headquarters for Bloomberg's company.

It could be said that Bloomberg's push for a West side stadium and attacks on Cablevision are evidence of Bloomberg looking out for the best interests of his developer buddy and the first stages of future deals that involve the development of the land on which Madison Square Garden now stands.

Why was Madison Square Garden called a 'garden'?

The "building" was an oval arena with brick walls and no roof. In 1875 the famous bandmaster Patrick Sarsfield Gilmore (composer of the song "When Johnny Comes Marching Home") obtained the lease and opened Gilmore's Garden. The bandleader converted the space into a garden with flowers, trees, and waterfalls, and held promenade concerts there. In 1879 William Vanderbilt regained control of the property and changed its name to Madison Square Garden.

this sounds convincing

Actually the word garden has many definitions, two of which are, "an open air eating or drinking place" and "a large hall for public entertainment". Origin of the world is from French and German.

Who were past owners of Madison Square Garden?

I can't answer your question directly, but I do know that Stanford White, the architect famous for numerous New York landmarks, had designed the garden that actually occupied the roof of the original Madison Square building, and was where he was killed by a jealous former lover's spouse. A good place to start is to read up on Stanford White; one book of interest is, "The Architect of Desire : Beauty and Danger in the Stanford White Family", written by his great-great-granddaughter (??) Suzannah Lessard.

OK...here it is (I guess)

MSG was owned by the Madison Square Garden Inc., which was led by Irwin Felt (hence The Felt Fourm which is now The Theater at MSG). MSG was then taken over by Gulf + Western. Gulf + Western took over Paramount Pictures Corporation in 1966, then changed the name of the company to Paramount Communications in 1989. In 1994, Paramount was acquired by Viacom. ITT then got MSG from Viacom...then entered into a partnership with Cablevision. Sometimes you'd see under the words Madison Square Garden "An ITT-Cablevision Company". Cablevision then took full control.

That's the best I can do with the answer.

I do know that before Cablevision purchased the Garden and all of its properties, it was previously owned by Paramount and then previously by Gulf + Western. This period cover I believe the late-70's through the early 90's.

What happened to the old Madison Square Garden building and where was it located?

There happened to be 4 arenas named Madison Square Garden in NYC. The latest one is built at 33rd St and 7th Ave, while the one before it was built at 50th St and 8th Ave. The first two buildings were arenas that became best known for holding fighting matches located at Madison Square hence its name. Madison Square Garden was originally The Hippodrome, a sports facility built by P.T. Barnum in 1884. It received the name of Madison Square Garden after it was acquired by William Vanderbilt in 1879. He started to lose money on it though, and razed the structure in 1889. The Horse Show Association acquired the site and commissioned Stanford White to replace it with a grand Moorish structure with the same name. Costing $3 million, it was the second-tallest structure in New York city, and it had the largest auditorium in the United States, seating 8,000. Despite all this, the place still lost money. It was sold to a real estate company in 1911 that went bankrupt in 1916, when the New York Life Insurance company foreclosed. They leased it to Tex Rickard, who did make it a going concern, but who also decided to move the facility to 50th and 8th Avenue. That facility lasted until 1968, when it was closed for the current MSG, on 33rd & 8th Ave. (This one replace the old Penn Station.) Eventually, the 50th St. building was torn down to make way for the Worldwide Plaza (1989).

How did Madison Square Garden get its name?

"Madison Square Garden derives its name from the park where the first two gardens were located (Madison Square) on Madison Avenue at 26th Street. As the venue moved to new locations the name still stuck. Madison Square Garden From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. It is also the name of the entity which owns the arena and several of the professional sports franchises which play there. There have been four incarnations of the arena. The first two were located at Madison Square, thus the name. Subsequently a new 20,000-seat Garden was built at 50th Street and 8th Avenue, and the current Garden is at 7th Avenue between 31st and 33rd Streets, situated on top of Pennsylvania Station. The present arena is informally known to some by its advertising slogan, "The World's Most Famous Arena". The arena lends its name to the Madison Square Garden Network, a cable television network that broadcasts most sporting events that are held in the Garden, as well as concerts and entertainment events that have taken place at the venue."

When was Madison Square Garden designed?

Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. It is also the name of the entity which owns the arena and several of the professional sports franchises which play there. There have been four incarnations of the arena. The first two were located at Madison Square, thus the name. Subsequently a new 20,000-seat Garden was built at 50th Street and 8th Avenue, and the current Garden is at 7th Avenue between 31st and 33rd Streets, situated on top of Pennsylvania Station. The present arena is informally known to some by its advertising slogan, "The World's Most Famous Arena". The arena lends its name to the Madison Square Garden Network, a cable television network that broadcasts most sporting events, and soon special concert and entertainment events, that are held in the Garden. Madison Square Garden derives its name from the park where the first two gardens were located (Madison Square) on Madison Avenue at 23rd Street. As the venue moved to new locations the name still stuck. 1879-1890 The site of the first Madison Square Garden, now known as Madison Square Garden I, was formerly the passenger depot at 23rd and Madison Avenue of the New York and Harlem Railroad. When the depot was moved to the current site of Grand Central Terminal in 1871 the depot was sold to P.T. Barnum and converted into a hippodrome called "Barnum's Monster Classical and Geological Hippodrome." In 1876 it was renamed "Gilmore's Garden." It was an open air arena. William Henry Vanderbilt officially renamed Gilmore's Garden "Madison Square Garden" and reopened the facility to the public on May 30, 1879 at 23rd Street and Madison Avenue. The first arena was originally built for the sport of track cycling, which is still remembered in the name of the Madison event. 1890-1925 The second Madison Square Garden (now known as Madison Square Garden II), also located at 23rd and Madison Avenue was designed by Stanford White, who would later be killed at the Garden's rooftop restaurant on June 25, 1906 by Harry K. Thaw allegedly because he seduced the murderer's wife, Evelyn Nesbit. White kept an apartment in the building. The new structure was 200 feet by 485 feet of Moorish architecture with a minaret-like tower soaring 32 stories over Madison Square Park and was the city's second tallest building. The Garden's main hall, was the largest in the world, measured 200 by 350 feet with permanent seating for 8,000 people and floor space for thousands more. Topping the garden was a statue of Diana which is now at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. A copy is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The statue is 18 feet high and is made of finely wrought copper and is gilded. It was designed by Augustus St. Gaudens, and was made by W. H. Mullins at Salem, Ohio. It weighed 1,800 pounds but spun in the wind. It hosted the 1924 Democratic National Convention, which nominated John W. Davis after 103 ballots. Afterwards, it was torn down to make way for the landmark New York Life Insurance Building. White was a member of the architecture firm McKim, Mead and White which designed Pennsylvania Station which was torn down to make way for MSG IV. The firm also designed the James Farley Post Office which is being proposed as the anchor for the proposed new Pennsylvania Station as well as the proposed MSG V. 1925-1968 The third garden, now known as Madison Square Garden III, was built on 50th Street and Eighth Avenue by boxing promoter Tex Rickard and was dubbed "The House That Tex Built." The New York Rangers got their name in a wordplay on Tex's name (e.g., Tex's Rangers). It was built in 249 days on the site of the city's trolley barns. In 1928 Rickard built "Boston Madison Square Garden." The name got clipped to Boston Garden. Boxing was Madison Square Garden III's principal claim to fame. The building exterior in contrast to the ornate towers of the first two Garden was a simple box. Its most unique feature was its ornate marquee. On January 17, 1941 23,190 people witnessed Fritzie Zivic successful welterweight defense against Henry Armstrong. That is the biggest attendance record of any of the Gardens. MSG III was featured prominently in the 2005 Ron Howard film Cinderella Man (although exterior montage shots glorified it by placing it against the Times Square signs on Broadway when it was in fact one block west). It hosted the only indoor bout in the career of Jack Dempsey. It cost $4.75 million to build; this one hosted seven NCAA men's basketball championships between 1943 and 1950. It also hosted the NBA All-Star Game in 1954 and 1955. When it was torn down, there was a proposal to build the world's tallest building on its site prompting a major battle in its Hell's Kitchen neighborhood that ultimately resulted in strict height restrictions. The space remained a parking lot though until 1989 when Worldwide Plaza designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill opened. Madison Square Garden Bowl Madison Square built an open air arena, the Madison Square Garden Bowl at 48th and Northern Boulevard in Long Island City in 1932 that could seat 72,000. This was the site where James Braddock defeated Max Baer for the World Heavyweight title on June 13, 1935 that was dramatized in the film Cinderella Man. Ironically Braddock was born on West 48th Street in Hell's Kitchen just a few blocks from the West 49th Street location of MSGIII. Braddock's first come back fight against John "Corn" Griffin was also in the venue. Jack Sharkey and Primo Carnera also captured the heavyweight crown in the 1930s at the Madison Square Garden Bowl. The bowl was torn down after World War II to make way for U.S. Steel and Ronzoni Macaroni Company factories. They in turn were torn down and the area is now home to a series of car dealerships. 1968-Present On February 11, 1968 the fourth Madison Square Garden, Madison Square Garden IV, opened after the financially troubled Pennsylvania Railroad tore down Pennsylvania Station (although the tracks remained underneath). The current Garden is the hub of Madison Square Garden Center in the office and entertainment complex known as Pennsylvania Plaza, for the railroad station atop which the complex is located. In 1991 Garden ownership spent $200 million to renovate the Garden including adding 89 suites. In 2004-2005 Cablevision was involved in an intense battle with the City of New York over the proposed West Side Stadium which they said would be competing with their venue. During the battle, Cablevision announced plans for $360 million in proposed renovations. When the stadium ultimately was stopped, Cablevision signed on to tear down the Garden and rebuild it on Ninth Avenue. New arena As of September 2005, the Garden's current owner, Cablevision, has plans to build a fifth Garden. If the project moves forward, a new Garden would be built at the western end of the James Farley Post Office, on 33rd Street and Ninth Avenue across the street, which is also eyed for a western expansion of Pennsylvania Station. The new Garden, which would remain home to the Rangers and the Knicks, would feature wide concourses with stores and restaurants, luxury boxes with better sight lines for basketball and hockey games, a museum, and a hall of fame. The current Garden would be torn down to be replaced with an office tower.

Did the Beatles sing at Madison square garden?

No, however John Lennon did in August of 1972 after he quit the Beatles.

What happened to the old Belvedere Hotel across from Madison Square Garden?

The Belvedere Hotel is still around. It is located at 319 West 48th St, New York, NY 10036.

Ice rink at Madison square garden frozen all year?

No. They have to melt the ice during the Westminster Dog Show because the dogs freak out and won't walk out onto the arena floor! Otw it is always there during hockey season.

How big is Madison Square Garden and how many people can be seated?

For hockey, the Garden seats 18,200; for basketball, 19,763; and for concerts 20,000 center stage, 19,522 end-stage. The arena features 20,976 square feet (1949 m²) of arena floor space.

How many gallons of water would Madison Square Garden hold?

I've been trying to find the inside dimensions of "The Garden" for some time now. I need these in order to answer your question. If you know them, please e-mail them to me at : csylay@ysahoo.com.
Thanks,
5oclockman

Who sold out Madison Square Garden the fastest of any artist?

Justin Bieber claims the record for selling out Madison Square Garden the fastest of any artist. Two shows for his Believe tour sold out in 30 seconds.