Pomeranians

Pomeranians otherwise known as "Pom Poms" are a tiny and charming little member of the toy group and is the smallest Spitz dog too. They make great companions but can also be great watchdogs due to their tendency to bark at strangers. Learn more about this sweet German breed in this category.

1,368 Questions
Dog Breeds
Pomeranians

What are pomeranian enemies?

cats

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Pomeranians

Is there a difference between a teacup pomeranian and an average pomeranian?

yes there is a difference because a teacup pomeranian is smaller and an average pomeranian is bigger!

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Food & Cooking
Dog Training
Dog Care
Pomeranians

What happened when people had a surplus of food?

FWESADC

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Pomeranians

Where is the habitat of a pomeranian?

in a forest

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High Jump
Pomeranians

How high can a pomeranian jump?

4ft

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Dieting and Weight Loss
Growth Rates
Weight and Mass
Pomeranians

How much is an 11-year-old supposed to weigh?

Probably about 65-75

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Pomeranians

What is the average Size of a pomeranian dog brain?

1.175 g

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Pomeranians

What are some good names for a black and tan pomeranian?

Here is a list of names that are good for a black and tan Pomeranian:

Note: Please do not remove suggestions of other contributors.

  • Blackie (M)
  • Buddy (M)
  • Charcoal (M)
  • Cricket (M)
  • Ember (F)
  • Onyx (F)
  • Peppy (M)
  • Poppy (M/F)
  • Sadie (F)
  • Sasha (F)
  • Shadow (M/F)
  • Zoë (F)
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Pomeranians

What is the life span of a Pomeranian?

0 Years

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Pomeranians

What is the habitat of a Pomeranian?

Being a domesticated dog, the habitat of a Pomeranian is a house.

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Allergies
Pomeranians
Papillon Dogs

Are Papillons good for people with allergies?

yes they love being with family and shed moderately low

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Pomeranians

Pomeranian: Petite Size, Giant Heart?

Dogs: the best friend a human can have. They are loyal, never turn their backs on their owners, and always brighten up a situation no matter how bleak. These are all great traits, but something else makes dogs great; the wide variety of breeds to choose from. With many different sizes, fur types, personalities, and colors, there will always be a dog that fits an individual person. One such breed, the Pomeranian, stands out from the rest; here is why.

Physical Traits:

Pomeranians are part of the toy series of dogs. Their average weight as an adult ranges from between four and eight pounds, with heights ranging from five to eleven inches. Pomeranians are also known for their fur, which ranges from the colors white, black, brown, and blonde, and is also extremely pouffy, giving them their pom-pom look. They have a very compact, yet stable build, and are equipped with two layers of fur which protect them from cold weather; the face is particularly covered with hair to protect them from harsh wind. Their tails are usually a few inches long, and are many times curled up over the back.

Personality:

What the Pomeranian lacks in size is certainly made up for its personality. The Pomeranian is a textbook lap-dog; developing very strong attachments to humans and because of this, both act very protective of their owners, and also can develop extreme separation anxiety or jealousy if their master is away for prolonged periods of time literally or emotionally. Pomeranians have very acute senses and are known to feel even the smallest change in external stimuli, whether it be sounds, sights, or smells. Normally they are not too friendly with other dogs and can get very defensive of their territory. Despite their extreme sensitivity, pomeranians are very intelligent and are easily trained during their early years.

Quality of Health

Pomeranians are known to live very long, from eleven to sixteen years. The most common conditions found in the breed are hip dysplasia, which is due to their light body type, and hyper-pigmentation, which is the darkening of skin on random parts of the body particularly the face.

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Pomeranians

Meet the Pomeranian: Big Dog Attitude in a Toy Dog Package?

The Pomeranian is a small dog with a big attitude that acts as a guard dog one minute and as a lap dog the next. Weighing in at seven pounds or less, the “Pom” is the perfect dog for both homeowners and apartment dwellers.

At any age, Pomeranians look like a ball of fur. They have a thick double coat that stands up and away from their body. Their coats can be in any one of thirteen colors or combination of colors, with orange being the most common. Coat maintenance requires weekly brushing and combing, and the Pom’s toenails will require trimming periodically.

The breed is one of the most popular in the United States, ranked fourteenth out of the 167 breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club. Pomeranians are highly intelligent dogs, and are at home in many different settings. They visit nursing homes and hospitals as therapy dogs, work as search and rescue dogs, and compete in obedience and agility events.

The Pomeranian’s intelligence and big dog attitude are both good and bad points to the breed. Their intelligence makes them quick to learn, but their owner must be as strong willed as they are if obedience training and housebreaking are to be successful. Their fearless attitude can get them in trouble, especially if they perceive a threat to themselves or their owner, and they will attack a larger animal without hesitation. Threats are also met with barking, which can become a nuisance if the dog is not properly trained.

Pomeranians are a sturdy long-living dog breed; their life span can range from fourteen to twenty years. They thrive in homes where they are kept indoors, safe from predators, heat, and potential theft. The breed also does well with older children; young children may unintentionally hurt a Pom due to its small size. Two health problems are common in Pomeranians: luxating patellae (knees slipping out of joint), and alopecia (abnormal hair loss).

Owning a Pomeranian requires a long term commitment. Pomeranians bond quickly and easily to their owners, and will provide many years of loving companionship.

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Pomeranians

An Inside Look at Pomeranian Dogs?

When it comes to toy dogs, Pomeranians are considered some of the best all round great miniature dog breeds available. The Pomeranian breed of dogs is named after an area of Central Europe that is known as Pomerania. Also known as Poms or Pom Poms, Pomeranians have a reputation for having friendly and lively temperament. Pomeranians have no problems establishing a deep and lasting bond with their owners and are typically very friendly with guests once they have been welcomed into the house. While Pomeranians are one of the noisier toy dogs when they notice something unusual in their environment, they are otherwise very intelligent and easy to train. Let’s take an inside look at exactly what types of appearance, behavior and general health concerns of this popular toy dog breed.

Pomeranians are instantly recognizable by their small faces, pointy ears and the fluffy hair that puffs out from stout frames. Most mature Pomeranians reach an adult weight of 4 to 7 pounds (about 2 to 3.5 kilograms) and can reach a maximum height of roughly 1 foot (about 30 centimeters). Like many toy dog breeds with thick fur, Pomeranians should be brushed once a day if possible to ensure that their double coat is as healthy as possible. Pomeranians continue to shed throughout the year, and daily brushing will avoid the likelihood of knots or clumps forming in the dog’s fur.

Although nearly all dogs do not enjoy being left behind by their owners, Pomeranians are particularly sensitive about being alone. Separation anxiety is very common with Pomeranians when they are left completely alone in the home. If left unattended for long periods of time, these dogs are known for making a considerable amount of noise by barking and whimpering, as well as releasing their stress by chewing on clothing, furniture and anything else that they can get a hold of. As a result, Pomeranians may not be the ideal dogs for professionals who will be away from home for most of the day if there is no one else in the household to keep the dog company.

Unlike some toy dog breeds, Pomeranians have hardly any inherent health problems despite their small size. A well-cared for Pomeranian can be expected to live for 13 to 15 years.

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Pomeranians
How To

How to Train a Pomeranian Not to Bark?

The Pomeranian is a beautiful breed, that is loyal, loving, and intelligent. These dogs are curious and lively, with energy to spare. However, all of this energy can sometimes present itself in the form of excessive barking. Pomeranians are dogs that will bark at visitors, other animals, or when they sense a disturbance of any kind. While this trait makes them great watchdogs, it can also be a nuisance to the dog owner. Fortunately, with the proper training, a Pomeranian can successfully learn to control it’s barking and become a cherished part of a family.

The most important thing that a Pomeranian owner must consider, is that these dogs bark instinctively. While it may be annoying at times, a Pomeranian is not trying to be irritation or cause an unwanted disturbance. This barking is the dogs way of warning it’s owner that a stranger is approaching. Therefore, it is important not to treat the dog’s barking as a disobedient behavior, but like a behavior that simply needs controlling.

Training a Pomeranian not to bark when it senses the presence of another animal or person is almost impossible. Instead, dog owners should aim to teach their dog to bark only once or twice, then cease the behavior. This can be done a few different ways.

When beginning to train a dog not to bark, a dog owner should choose a specific command that the dog can connect with the need to stop barking. This command can be “No barking” or “Quiet”, and should be separate from other commands. Each time the dog begins to bark, the dog owner should promptly use the command and give the dog a treat when the command is followed. As the dog begins to listen to the command, less treats will need to be given, but should still be presented sporadically as to encourage the dog to continue this behavior.

Another way to train a Pomeranian not to bark is to respond to it’s barking with an unwanted behavior. A dog owner can fill a spray bottle with water and spray the dog as it begins to bark, or make an unpleasant sound in response to the barking. A great way to do this is to fill a plastic container with rocks and shake it each time the dog barks. After awhile the dog will begin to associate this unpleasant action with it’s barking, and will reduce the tendecy to barking. With some time and effort, a Pomeranian can effectively learn not to bark and become a quieter, more pleasant companion.

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Pomeranians

How can I advertise my 2 puppies, mwhich were not planned?

2 male pomeranians I need to sell, How do I effectively advertise

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Pomeranians

Is there any genetic problems I should look for when adopting a pomeranian?

The most common problem with Pomeranians is dislocating knees and hyperthroidism. Males also suffer from coat loss caused by genetics. You can get a complete list here http://www.mbfonline.com/pomhealth/

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Pomeranians

How much will a Pomeranian eat?

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Pomeranians

How much should I feed my 3 pound pomeranian?

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Pomeranians

What does a pomeranian chihuahua look like?

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Pomeranians

How much does a Pomeranian chihuahua weigh?

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Pomeranians

How many pomeranians are there in the world?

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Pomeranians

How much should a Pomeranian weigh?

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Pomeranians

Can teacup Pomeranian swim?

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Pomeranians

How much does a Pomeranian cost in pounds?

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