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Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI is the 265th and current Pope. Papacy began on 19 April, 2005 and is the successor of Pope John Paul II

1,282 Questions

When did Pope Benedict XVI become pope?

He was elected Pope on April 19th 2005, in a papal conclave. He then celebrated his Papal Inauguration Mass on April 24th 2005. And on May 7th 2005 he took possession of his Cathedral.

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was elected Pope on the 19 of April in 2005, and took the name Benedict XVI.

I take it you mean when Pope Benedict XVI was pope, or when Benedict XVI become pope. I'll answer both ways. Cardinal Joseph Alois Ratzinger a major prefect in the Roman Curia (the Holy See's government in a way) and also dean the College of Cardinals under Pope John Paul II. When John Paul died in April 2005, the College of Cardinals entered conclave on April 17 and on the two days later on April 19, the Cardinals elected Cardinal Ratzinger as pope being John Paul's successor. Cardinal Ratzinger as you know took the name of Benedict XVI. Pope Benedict led the Church from his election in 2005 to his resignation/retirement on Feb. 28, 2013 due to exhaustion and old age.

What are the names of all the popes in order ending with Benedict XVI?

The List of Popes(from the New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia

  1. St. Peter (32-67)
  2. St. Linus (67-76)
  3. St. Anacletus (Cletus) (76-88)
  4. St. Clement I (88-97)
  5. St. Evaristus (97-105)
  6. St. Alexander I (105-115)
  7. St. Sixtus I (115-125) Also called Xystus I
  8. St. Telesphorus (125-136)
  9. St. Hyginus (136-140)
  10. St. Pius I (140-155)
  11. St. Anicetus (155-166)
  12. St. Soter (166-175)
  13. St. Eleutherius (175-189)
  14. St. Victor I (189-199)
  15. St. Zephyrinus (199-217)
  16. St. Callistus I (217-22) Callistus and the following three popes were opposed by St. Hippolytus, antipope (217-236)
  17. St. Urban I (222-30)
  18. St. Pontain (230-35)
  19. St. Anterus (235-36)
  20. St. Fabian (236-50)
  21. St. Cornelius (251-53) Opposed by Novatian, antipope (251)
  22. St. Lucius I (253-54)
  23. St. Stephen I (254-257)
  24. St. Sixtus II (257-258)
  25. St. Dionysius (260-268)
  26. St. Felix I (269-274)
  27. St. Eutychian (275-283)
  28. St. Caius (283-296) Also called Gaius
  29. St. Marcellinus (296-304)
  30. St. Marcellus I (308-309)
  31. St. Eusebius (309 or 310)
  32. St. Miltiades (311-14)
  33. St. Sylvester I (314-35)
  34. St. Marcus (336)
  35. St. Julius I (337-52)
  36. Liberius (352-66) Opposed by Felix II, antipope (355-365)
  37. St. Damasus I (366-83) Opposed by Ursicinus, antipope (366-367)
  38. St. Siricius (384-99)
  39. St. Anastasius I (399-401)
  40. St. Innocent I (401-17)
  41. St. Zosimus (417-18)
  42. St. Boniface I (418-22) Opposed by Eulalius, antipope (418-419)
  43. St. Celestine I (422-32)
  44. St. Sixtus III (432-40)
  45. St. Leo I (the Great) (440-61)
  46. St. Hilarius (461-68)
  47. St. Simplicius (468-83)
  48. St. Felix III (II) (483-92)
  49. St. Gelasius I (492-96)
  50. Anastasius II (496-98)
  51. St. Symmachus (498-514) Opposed by Laurentius, antipope (498-501)
  52. St. Hormisdas (514-23)
  53. St. John I (523-26)
  54. St. Felix IV (III) (526-30)
  55. Boniface II (530-32) Opposed by Dioscorus, antipope (530)
  56. John II (533-35)
  57. St. Agapetus I (535-36) Also called Agapitus I
  58. St. Silverius (536-37)
  59. Vigilius (537-55)
  60. Pelagius I (556-61)
  61. John III (561-74)
  62. Benedict I (575-79)
  63. Pelagius II (579-90)
  64. St. Gregory I (the Great) (590-604)
  65. Sabinian (604-606)
  66. Boniface III (607)
  67. St. Boniface IV (608-15)
  68. St. Deusdedit (Adeodatus I) (615-18)
  69. Boniface V (619-25)
  70. Honorius I (625-38)
  71. Severinus (640)
  72. John IV (640-42)
  73. Theodore I (642-49)
  74. St. Martin I (649-55)
  75. St. Eugene I (655-57)
  76. St. Vitalian (657-72)
  77. Adeodatus (II) (672-76)
  78. Donus (676-78)
  79. St. Agatho (678-81)
  80. St. Leo II (682-83)
  81. St. Benedict II (684-85)
  82. John V (685-86)
  83. Conon (686-87)
  84. St. Sergius I (687-701) Opposed by Theodore and Paschal, antipopes (687)
  85. John VI (701-05)
  86. John VII (705-07)
  87. Sisinnius (708)
  88. Constantine (708-15)
  89. St. Gregory II (715-31)
  90. St. Gregory III (731-41)
  91. St. Zachary (741-52) Stephen II followed Zachary, but because he died before being consecrated, modern lists omit him
  92. Stephen III (752-57)
  93. St. Paul I (757-67)
  94. Stephen IV (767-72) Opposed by Constantine II (767) and Philip (768), antipopes (767)
  95. Adrian I (772-95)
  96. St. Leo III (795-816)
  97. Stephen V (816-17)
  98. St. Paschal I (817-24)
  99. Eugene II (824-27)
  100. Valentine (827)
  101. Gregory IV (827-44)
  102. Sergius II (844-47) Opposed by John, antipope (855)
  103. St. Leo IV (847-55)
  104. Benedict III (855-58) Opposed by Anastasius, antipope (855)
  105. St. Nicholas I (the Great) (858-67)
  106. Adrian II (867-72)
  107. John VIII (872-82)
  108. Marinus I (882-84)
  109. St. Adrian III (884-85)
  110. Stephen VI (885-91)
  111. Formosus (891-96)
  112. Boniface VI (896)
  113. Stephen VII (896-97)
  114. Romanus (897)
  115. Theodore II (897)
  116. John IX (898-900)
  117. Benedict IV (900-03)
  118. Leo V (903) Opposed by Christopher, antipope (903-904)
  119. Sergius III (904-11)
  120. Anastasius III (911-13)
  121. Lando (913-14)
  122. John X (914-28)
  123. Leo VI (928)
  124. Stephen VIII (929-31)
  125. John XI (931-35)
  126. Leo VII (936-39)
  127. Stephen IX (939-42)
  128. Marinus II (942-46)
  129. Agapetus II (946-55)
  130. John XII (955-63)
  131. Leo VIII (963-64)
  132. Benedict V (964)
  133. John XIII (965-72)
  134. Benedict VI (973-74)
  135. Benedict VII (974-83) Benedict and John XIV were opposed by Boniface VII, antipope (974; 984-985)
  136. John XIV (983-84)
  137. John XV (985-96)
  138. Gregory V (996-99) Opposed by John XVI, antipope (997-998)
  139. Sylvester II (999-1003)
  140. John XVII (1003)
  141. John XVIII (1003-09)
  142. Sergius IV (1009-12)
  143. Benedict VIII (1012-24) Opposed by Gregory, antipope (1012)
  144. John XIX (1024-32)
  145. Benedict IX (1032-45) He appears on this list three separate times, because he was twice deposed and restored
  146. Sylvester III (1045) Considered by some to be an antipope
  147. Benedict IX (1045)
  148. Gregory VI (1045-46)
  149. Clement II (1046-47)
  150. Benedict IX (1047-48)
  151. Damasus II (1048)
  152. St. Leo IX (1049-54)
  153. Victor II (1055-57)
  154. Stephen X (1057-58)
  155. Nicholas II (1058-61) Opposed by Benedict X, antipope (1058)
  156. Alexander II (1061-73) Opposed by Honorius II, antipope (1061-1072)
  157. St. Gregory VII (1073-85) Gregory and the following three popes were opposed by Guibert ("Clement III"), antipope (1080-1100)
  158. Blessed Victor III (1086-87)
  159. Blessed Urban II (1088-99)
  160. Paschal II (1099-1118) Opposed by Theodoric (1100), Aleric (1102) and Maginulf ("Sylvester IV", 1105-1111), antipopes (1100)
  161. Gelasius II (1118-19) Opposed by Burdin ("Gregory VIII"), antipope (1118)
  162. Callistus II (1119-24)
  163. Honorius II (1124-30) Opposed by Celestine II, antipope (1124)
  164. Innocent II (1130-43) Opposed by Anacletus II (1130-1138) and Gregory Conti ("Victor IV") (1138), antipopes (1138)
  165. Celestine II (1143-44)
  166. Lucius II (1144-45)
  167. Blessed Eugene III (1145-53)
  168. Anastasius IV (1153-54)
  169. Adrian IV (1154-59)
  170. Alexander III (1159-81) Opposed by Octavius ("Victor IV") (1159-1164), Pascal III (1165-1168), Callistus III (1168-1177) and Innocent III (1178-1180), antipopes
  171. Lucius III (1181-85)
  172. Urban III (1185-87)
  173. Gregory VIII (1187)
  174. Clement III (1187-91)
  175. Celestine III (1191-98)
  176. Innocent III (1198-1216)
  177. Honorius III (1216-27)
  178. Gregory IX (1227-41)
  179. Celestine IV (1241)
  180. Innocent IV (1243-54)
  181. Alexander IV (1254-61)
  182. Urban IV (1261-64)
  183. Clement IV (1265-68)
  184. Blessed Gregory X (1271-76)
  185. Blessed Innocent V (1276)
  186. Adrian V (1276)
  187. John XXI (1276-77)
  188. Nicholas III (1277-80)
  189. Martin IV (1281-85)
  190. Honorius IV (1285-87)
  191. Nicholas IV (1288-92)
  192. St. Celestine V (1294)
  193. Boniface VIII (1294-1303)
  194. Blessed Benedict XI (1303-04)
  195. Clement V (1305-14)
  196. John XXII (1316-34) Opposed by Nicholas V, antipope (1328-1330)
  197. Benedict XII (1334-42)
  198. Clement VI (1342-52)
  199. Innocent VI (1352-62)
  200. Blessed Urban V (1362-70)
  201. Gregory XI (1370-78)
  202. Urban VI (1378-89) Opposed by Robert of Geneva ("Clement VII"), antipope (1378-1394)
  203. Boniface IX (1389-1404) Opposed by Robert of Geneva ("Clement VII") (1378-1394), Pedro de Luna ("Benedict XIII") (1394-1417) and Baldassare Cossa ("John XXIII") (1400-1415), antipopes
  204. Innocent VII (1404-06) Opposed by Pedro de Luna ("Benedict XIII") (1394-1417) and Baldassare Cossa ("John XXIII") (1400-1415), antipopes
  205. Gregory XII (1406-15) Opposed by Pedro de Luna ("Benedict XIII") (1394-1417), Baldassare Cossa ("John XXIII") (1400-1415), and Pietro Philarghi ("Alexander V") (1409-1410), antipopes
  206. Martin V (1417-31)
  207. Eugene IV (1431-47) Opposed by Amadeus of Savoy ("Felix V"), antipope (1439-1449)
  208. Nicholas V (1447-55)
  209. Callistus III (1455-58)
  210. Pius II (1458-64)
  211. Paul II (1464-71)
  212. Sixtus IV (1471-84)
  213. Innocent VIII (1484-92)
  214. Alexander VI (1492-1503)
  215. Pius III (1503)
  216. Julius II (1503-13)
  217. Leo X (1513-21)
  218. Adrian VI (1522-23)
  219. Clement VII (1523-34)
  220. Paul III (1534-49)
  221. Julius III (1550-55)
  222. Marcellus II (1555)
  223. Paul IV (1555-59)
  224. Pius IV (1559-65)
  225. St. Pius V (1566-72)
  226. Gregory XIII (1572-85)
  227. Sixtus V (1585-90)
  228. Urban VII (1590)
  229. Gregory XIV (1590-91)
  230. Innocent IX (1591)
  231. Clement VIII (1592-1605)
  232. Leo XI (1605)
  233. Paul V (1605-21)
  234. Gregory XV (1621-23)
  235. Urban VIII (1623-44)
  236. Innocent X (1644-55)
  237. Alexander VII (1655-67)
  238. Clement IX (1667-69)
  239. Clement X (1670-76)
  240. Blessed Innocent XI (1676-89)
  241. Alexander VIII (1689-91)
  242. Innocent XII (1691-1700)
  243. Clement XI (1700-21)
  244. Innocent XIII (1721-24)
  245. Benedict XIII (1724-30)
  246. Clement XII (1730-40)
  247. Benedict XIV (1740-58)
  248. Clement XIII (1758-69)
  249. Clement XIV (1769-74)
  250. Pius VI (1775-99)
  251. Pius VII (1800-23)
  252. Leo XII (1823-29)
  253. Pius VIII (1829-30)
  254. Gregory XVI (1831-46)
  255. Blessed Pius IX (1846-78)
  256. Leo XIII (1878-1903)
  257. St. Pius X (1903-14)
  258. Benedict XV (1914-22)
  259. Pius XI (1922-39)
  260. Pius XII (1939-58)
  261. Blessed John XXIII (1958-63)
  262. Paul VI (1963-78)
  263. John Paul I (1978)
  264. Blessed John Paul II (1978-2005)
  265. Benedict XVI (2005-2013)
  266. Francis (2013—)

What job did Pope Benedict's sister do?

From 1959 Maria Ratzinger helped her Joseph brother in his household since he had been made a full professor at Bonn university and continued to do manage it until she died in 1991.

Is Pope Benedict illuminati?

Catholic AnswerNo, don't be ridiculous, the Illuminati was a secret society which was formed during the Enlightenment by protestant Deists. It was destroyed nine years after it was formed.

When and where was the present pope born?

Pope Francis was born on December 17, 1936, in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Is the Pope Benedict's sister one of the Jehovah's Witnesses?

Actually, it is his cousin, that I have heard is a Jehovah's Witness. He hadn't seen her since childhood and then called her and praised the Witnesses. He said "Your religion is growing and building new Kingdom Halls. Mine is losing members and closing churches." This made the news.

What languages does Pope Benedict XVI speak?

Pope Benedict XVI is fluent in:

German

Italian

French

English

Spanish

Portuguese

Latin

additionally he reads and understands

Ancient Greek

Biblical Hebrew

When was Pope Benedict XVI born?

Pope Benedict XVI was born on April 16, 1927.

When will Pope Benedict XVI retire?

Benedict XVI will retire at 20:00 (19:00 GMT) on 28th February, 2013.

Is Pope Benedict XVI a Freemason?

As freemasonry has historically sought to undermine Catholicism and quite literally overturn it as an institution, the answer is quite simple; no!
Pope Benedict XVI is not a Freemason. Prior to becoming Pope, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger issued a document in 1983 forbidding membership in Masonic bodies for members of the Catholic faith. Here is the text:

=

CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH

DECLARATION ON MASONIC ASSOCIATIONS

It has been asked whether there has been any change in the Church's decision in regard to Masonic associations since the new Code of Canon Law does not mention them expressly, unlike the previous Code.

This Sacred Congregation is in a position to reply that this circumstance in due to an editorial criterion which was followed also in the case of other associations likewise unmentioned inasmuch as they are contained in wider categories.

Therefore the Church's negative judgment in regard to Masonic association remains unchanged since their principles have always been considered irreconcilable with the doctrine of the Church and therefore membership in them remains forbidden. The faithful who enroll in Masonic associations are in a state of grave sin and may not receive Holy Communion.

It is not within the competence of local ecclesiastical authorities to give a judgment on the nature of Masonic associations which would imply a derogation from what has been decided above, and this in line with the Declaration of this Sacred Congregation issued on 17 February 1981 (cf. AAS 73 1981 pp. 240-241; English language edition of L'Osservatore Romano, 9 March 1981).

In an audience granted to the undersigned Cardinal Prefect, the Supreme Pontiff John Paul II approved and ordered the publication of this Declaration which had been decided in an ordinary meeting of this Sacred Congregation.

Rome, from the Office of the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, 26 November 1983.

Joseph Card. RATZINGER

Prefect

Why did Pope Benedict become pope?

He became pope because the College of Cardinals elected him as pope. It is said that Cardinal Ratzinger had been a close confident of Pope John Paul II and his personal choice to succeed him as pope.

Pope Benedict was made pope, the successor of Saint Peter, just like every other pope is made pope. He was a Roman Catholic Cardinal elected by a congregation of Cardinals.

Was the Pope Benedict XVI a Hitler youth?

Yes he was in the nazi youth for a short period of time. He returned home absent without leave.

"When Ratzinger turned 14 in 1941, as required by law he joined the Hitler Youth. According to his biographer John Allen he was not an enthusiastic member. He requested to be taken off the rolls and reportedly refused to attend a single meeting."

source: Jewish Virtual Library

Was the Vatican where they decided that Benedict was going to be the new pope?

The Vatican is the place where the Worlds Cardinals meet to make the decision. The Cardinals pray and discuss all the candidates and each day they vote. At the end of each day when the voting is complete, if there is no positive decision on the new pope, the voting ballots are burned and the smoke that rises tells the world if a decision has been made. Black smoke, no decision, white smoke and we have a new pope. This process goes on for days and could go on for weeks until a decision is made. This is an important decision for Catholics and really for all christians as the Pope is the next successor to Saint Peter (the rock) who was the first Pope.

Was Pope Benedict XVI the first German to be elected pope?

There have been other German popes: Gregory V
Pope Adrian VI
Pope Clement II
Pope Damasus II
Pope Gregory V
Pope Leo IX
Pope Stephen VIII
Pope Stephen IX
Pope Victor II

How old is Pope Benedict XVI?

Pope (Emeritus) Benedict XVI is 90 years old (born Joseph Ratzinger, April 16, 1927).

What religious order does Pope Benedict belong to?

Pope Benedict was a diocesan priest early on his life in Munich. Diocesan priests commit their lives to serving the people of a diocese, a church administrative region, and generally work in parishes assigned by the bishop of their diocese. Diocesan priests take oaths of celibacy and obedience. He was NOT in a religious order.

Is Pope Benedict your pope right now?

Pope Benedict XVI retired on February 28, 2013, and was replaced on March 13, 2013, by Pope Francis who, as of 2014, continues to lead the Church.

No, but as of 2010 he is the pope of those people that are Roman Catholics

Why did the Catholic Church sack Pope Benedict?

...And who do you think has the authority to sack a pope?

.

AnswerNobody "sacked" the pope. The only possible reason that Church could possibly have for trying to get rid of a pope would be outright heresy, and I'm not even sure that is possible as Our Blessed Lord himself guaranteed to Peter and his successors that they would be strengthened in the faith. (See St. Matthew 16:17-19) The Holy Father is the Vicar of Christ on earth, he is the "office of last resort", nobody has authority over him, except Our Blessed Lord, Himself. Pope Benedict XVI resigned from office, ostensibly for the reasons he gave the public: his age and failing health. If he had other reasons, they are between himself and God.

What is the previous nationality of Pope Benedict XVI?

German.

German.

German.

German.

German.

German.

German.

German.

German.

German.

German.

Is Benedict XVI German?

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

Yes, he is German.

What is the name of Pope Benedict XVI?

Pope Benedict XVI was born Joseph Alois Ratzinger in Bavaria, Germany on April 16 1927.

Where was Pope Benedict during World War 2?

Following his 14th birthday in 1941, he was enrolled in the "Hitler Youth", as it was against the law not to enroll since 1939...he was unenthusiastic and refused to attend meetings! At age 16 he was drafted into the German anti-aircraft corps, but a subsequent illness precluded him from the usual rigours of military duty. After some time, he abandoned his post and returned home absent without leave. At the end of the war he was taken prisoner of war by the American forces for several weeks before being released.

He and his brother Georg entered the priesthood after the war in the summer of 1945.Neither he nor his brother had any voluntary involvement World War II!