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Presidential Inaugurations

This category contains questions and answers about the history of Presidential Inaugurations, the Oath of Office, and the celebrations afterward.

2,361 Questions
US Presidents
Political Office Holders
Presidential Inaugurations

What is a sitting president?

A sitting president is the current president. US Presidents are called "President" until they die, reference therefore to the present-day president is made as 'sitting President'.

US Presidents
Elections and Voting
Presidential Inaugurations

Steps to a presidential election?

The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries.

Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention.

Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states.

The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention. The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries.

Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention.

Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states.

The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention. The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries.

Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention.

Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states.

The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention.

History of the United States
US Presidents
George Washington
Presidential Inaugurations

What are the names of all the US Presidents before George Washington?

George Washington was the first President of the United States. But there were "Presidents of Congress" both before and after the Articles of Confederation. These 14 men were "presiding officers", not chief executives of the country (Washington was the first).

Presidents of Congress (September 5, 1774 - November 5, 1781)

1. Peyton Randolph (twice)

2. Henry Middleton

3. John Hancock (see below)

4. Henry Laurens

5. John Jay

6. Samuel Huntington

7. Thomas McKean

Presidents under the Articles of Confederation ( November 5, 1781 - November 15, 1788)

1. John Hanson

2. Elias Boudinot

3. Thomas Mifflin

4. Richard Henry Lee

5. John Hancock

6. Nathaniel Gorham

7. Arthur St. Clair

8. Cyrus Griffin

Politics and Government
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was the first president to be inaugurated on January 20?

The first President to be inaugurated on January 20th was Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1937. Previously, the Presidential inauguration date had been March 4. This was changed by the passage of the 20th Amendment, ratified on January 23, 1933.

The 32nd President, FDR was both the first inaugurated on January 20 (his second of four terms) and the last inaugurated on March 4 (his first term in 1933).

US Constitution
US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

What is it called when a president is sworn into office?

The ceremony in which the President of the United States takes the oath of office is called an inauguration or the Presidential Inauguration.

US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was previously a cobbler and later became the President of US?

Abraham Lincoln

Politics and Government
US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was Jimmy Carter's opponent?

Gerald R. Ford, the incumbent President, was Carter's opponent in 1976.

Ronald W. Reagan was his opponent when he ran for re-election in 1980.

Law & Legal Issues
US Presidents
Iowa
Presidential Inaugurations

Which candidates won yesterday's Iowa caucuses?

obama and hakabi

US Presidents
George Washington
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was a president before George Washington?

George Washington was the first presiedent

US Presidents
John F. Kennedy
Presidential Inaugurations

What year was John F. Kennedy elected President?

The election year John F. Kennedy was elected President was 1960.

Presidential Inaugurations

Why was the inauguration date changed?

The March 4th date was so travelers could avoid bad weather as most of it was done by foot or horseback. Letters had to be mailed to prospective appointees and replies had to be mailed back. Roads were often impassible. After rapid transportation and communication came into being the March 4th date could be moved to January 20 and the passage of the 20th Amendment to the Constitution in 1933 made the change. Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Second Inauguration was the first to have been held on January 20th. Except for Washington's first inaugural, when he was sworn in on April 30, 1789, all presidents until 1937 were inaugurated in March. Since the four month delay was no longer needed, it seemed best let the new administration get to work as soon as they reasonably could get set up.

Cars & Vehicles
US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was the president to ride in an automobile?

In November of 1899, William McKinley became the first president to ride in an automobile. The car was a steam carriage driven by its inventor, F.O. Stanley, at Washington, D.C.

In August of 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt took the first public automobile ride by a president during a parade at Hartford, Connecticut, in a Columbia electric car.

History of the United States
US Supreme Court
Presidential Inaugurations

What did Marbury v Madison have to do with the Democratic-Republicans?

Marbury v. Madison was emblematic of the political battle between the Federalist Party and the Democratic-Republican Party (formerly called the Anti-Federalists) for control of the Judicial branch of government.

John Marshall defused the political tension by giving the new Jefferson administration a narrow ruling on Marbury that satisfied the Democratic-Republicans, but simultaneously enhanced the power of the judiciary by clearly explicating the Court's right of judicial review, by declaring Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789 unconstitutional (a legal maneuver).

President Jefferson was not pleased with that aspect of the ruling and predicted the Supreme Court would become an "oligarchy," but had no grounds to challenge Marshall because the decision was in his party's, and his administration's, favor.

Case Citation:

Marbury v. Madison, 5 US 137 (1803)

US Constitution
Presidential Inaugurations
US Congress

Which amendment changed the congress convenes from March 4 to January 20?

20th amendment

Presidential Inaugurations

When is the presidential inauguration held in the us?

The 46th President of the United States will be sworn in on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021 on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol. Both the vice president-elect Kamala Harris and president-elect Joe Biden will take Oaths of Office, which usually takes place at noon, followed by an inaugural address. Attendance will be mostly limited to Congress and COVID-19 safety protocols outlined by the inauguration’s chief medical adviser.

Thomas Jefferson
Presidential Inaugurations

Why was Jefferson's inauguration important?

Jefferson's inauguration was important because John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were on opposite sides politically. This inauguration showed that power could be transferred peacefully.

Abraham Lincoln
Presidential Inaugurations

Who succeeded presidency after Abraham Lincoln?

Andrew Johnson

US Constitution
Presidential Inaugurations

Which amendment moved inauguration day from march fourth to January twentieth?

20th Amendment ratified 1/23/1933 Realizing that the severity of the Great Depression required prompt action, there was widespread agreement that inauguration and installation of newly elected Congressmen and Presidents should be moved forward from the traditional March 4th date. When first enacted, it was a time when people travelled by horseback or horse-drawn conveyance. The age of the automobile, improved train travel, and even the nascent airlines made such a delay unnecessary.

US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations
Biggest, Strongest, Fastest and Other Extremes

Who was the 2nd youngest person ever to be elected US President?

Theodore Roosevelt - Age 46 years 11 days 0n Nov 8, 1904 Next youngest was Bill Clinton - Age 46 years 77 days on Nov 3, 1992.

US Presidents
Barack Obama
Presidential Inaugurations

What month is the president inaugurated into office?

Third week of January I think.

George Washington
US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

What suggestion did George Washington make in his farewell address?

He argues that the country should avoid permanent alliances with all foreign nations, although temporary alliances during times of extreme danger may be necessary. He states that current treaties should be honored but not extended.

History of the United States
US Constitution
Presidential Inaugurations

Why does the united states not have a national police force?

They sort of do - its called the FBI - Federal Bureau of Investigation

Democratic Party
Presidential Inaugurations
Hillary Clinton

Can Hillary Clinton bring Hope and Change?

Hillary has great personal charisma and will bring the American people the Hope and Change that the Obama administration promised but failed to deliver.

US Presidents
US Constitution
Presidential Inaugurations

What is the text of the oath of office of the President of the United States?

"I, [President's Name] do solemnly swear, that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will, to the best of my ability, preserve protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, so help me G-d." The constitution does not include the last statement "So help me G-d." This was was supposedly added by George Washington after he was sworn in as the first President in 1789. Others attribute it to Abraham Lincoln. For more information on this see http://www.answers.com/topic/oath-of-office-of-the-president-of-the-united-states

Barack Obama
Presidential Inaugurations

What is Barack Obama's street address?

I don't know the exact address, but it's the intersection of 50th and Greenwood in Chicago, Il 5046 S Greenwood Avenue , Chicago, IL 60615 ---- 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Washington, DC 20500