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Tasmanian Tigers

Thylacines, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger or Tasmanian wolf, this creature was neither a tiger nor a wolf, but the largest carnivorous marsupial. Now believed to be extinct, it once roamed the Australian continent but, since European settlement, was known only on the Australian island of Tasmania.

1,111 Questions

How does the Tasmanian Wolf raise its young?

It doesn't. The Tasmanian wolf, more properly known as the Thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger, is believed to be extinct. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo in 1936.

Before becoming extinct, the Thylacine had the same reproductive characteristics as other marsupials. The young joeys were born very undeveloped, then they cralwed into the mother's pouch where they latched onto a teat. The teat swelled in their mouth, securing them in the pouch until they were ready to feed on other things besides mothers' milk.

Thylacines bred all year round, producing between two and four joeys each breeding season. The joeys stayed in the pouch for around three months. After they were too big to stay in the pouch, the mother Thylacine would have a lair somewhere, where the joeys stayed until they were old enough to learn to hunt.

How long ago did Tasmanian tigers live?

The Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, was known up until 1936. This is when the last known Thylacine died in captivity. There have been no confirmed sightings since then.

It was one of the biggest carnivorous marsupials, and native to Australia and New Guinea.

Why is the thylacine dangerous?

The thylacine is no longer dangerous, as it is believed to be extinct.

When alive, it posed no danger to humans. It was a carnivorous marsupial which preyed on birds and other mammals.

Is there any evidence that the Tasmanian tiger is NOT extinct?

When any given species has not been sighted for a certain number of years, it is declared extinct. There have been no confirmed sightings of the Tasmanian Tiger, more correctly known as Thylacine, since the last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo in September 1936. Until there is a confirmed sighting, the Thylacine will continue to be regarded as extinct.

How did the thylacine live?

Prior to their extinction, Thylacines (also known as Tasmanian tigers) lived in grasslands and bushland of Tasmania. There is also fossil evidence indicating that they lived on the Australian mainland.

The Thylacine was a dasyurid, or carnivorous marsupial, which preyed on mammals smaller than itself. Being a marsupial, the female had a pouch. The Thylacine had a gestation period of one month, and the young spent another 3-4 months continuing their development in the pouch.

How do scientists think Tasmanian tigers became extinct?

It is not really a matter of what scientists think about the extinction of the Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine. Its extinction is based on several, clear facts.

The Thylacine's extinction in Tasmania was directly a result of European settlement. Farmers were concerned the animal was a threat to livestock, so they petitioned for a bounty to be placed on it, allowing them to kill the creature on sight.

Scientists do have a theory regarding why the Thylacine became extinct from the Australian mainland (not the island of Tasmania). This is believed to be due to the introduction of the dingo, and the increased competition for food.

Further research has suggested that, in the early part of the Twentieth Century, an extremely virulent disease began to spread first through the wild Thylacine populations. Exactly what this disease was remains unknown but it was described as being similar to but distinct from canine distemper. Another theory points to the fact that, by the time the Thylacine was confined to the island of Tasmania, the remaining specimens did not have sufficient genetic diversity to sustain the population.

What is a Tasmanian tiger's features?

The Tasmanian tiger (Thylacine) is now extinct.

It had fur that was grey-brown (not orange, as sometimes depicted), and it had up to 16 black or brown stripes on its back, predominantly at the tail end.

The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was about 100cm-110cm in length, with its tail half the length of its body again. The average total length was around 180cm (6ft) from nose to tail tip. The largest measured specimen was 9.5 ft from nose to tail (289cm - just short of 3 m), but this was highly unusual.

Adults stood about 50-60 cm (average 59cm) at the shoulder and weighed 15-30 kilograms, or 33 to 66 lb. The males were larger than females on average.

Thylacines were marsupials, which meant that the young were born undeveloped and suckled on mothers' milk whilst in a pouch. The female was believed to bear around three young, once a year, during the winter-spring breeding season. As she had four teats, the female could carry up to four young in her pouch. The pouch could expand to the size where, with nearly-grown young in it, it would reach almost to the ground. The male was unusual in that he had a pouch which protected his reproductive organs as he raced through the dense undergrowth.

Where can you find a thylacine?

You cannot find a Thylacine anywhere, as the last known specimen died in 1936.

From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However, fossil evidence from a long time ago indicates they once also lived on the Australian mainland and in New Guinea.

The habitat of the thylacine was open bushland such as dry eucalypt forest or grasslands or sometimes the edge of open wetlands.

How is the Tasmanian wolf useful to us?

The correct name for the Tasmanian wolf is Thylacine. This creature, also known as the Tasmanian tiger, is extinct. When it was still in existence, it was a hunter and predator; its purpose was not to be useful to mankind.

How does a Thylacine reproduce?

The thylacine no longer reproduces as it is extinct.

However, being a mammal, it engaged in sexual reproduction. This animal was a marsupial. Prior to its extinction, the Thylacine had a gestation period of one month, and the young joeys spent another 3-4 months continuing their development in the pouch. Having several joeys in the pouch would weigh the female down, bringing her abdomen almost to ground level, so after this, they were transferred to a den.

Interestingly, the male thylacine was unique for having a pouch, which was used for protecting its reproductive parts when running through thick undergrowth and scrub.

How does the Tasmanian Wolf adapt to its surroundings?

It could be argued that the Tasmanian Wolf (more properly known as the Thylacine) has failed to adapt to its surroundings - it is now believed to be extinct.

Surf on over to the nice article (with good pics) posted by our friends at Wikipedia and have a read. It'll be worth it. A link is provided to get you started.

What did the thylacine eat?

The Thylacine was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself.

The Thylacine sometimes scavenged for food, and was known to feed on the carcasses of rabbits and wallabies.

What did the thylacine tiger eat?

The correct name is Thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus), not "thylacine tiger". It was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself.

The Thylacine sometimes scavenged for food, and was known to feed on the carcasses of rabbits and wallabies.

Some studies have suggested that the animal may have hunted in small family groups, with the main group herding prey in the general direction of an individual waiting in ambush. However, scientific and fossil evidence indicates the Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was a solitary animal that lived and hunted alone.

What is the Tasmanian wolf's habitat?

The habitat of the Tasmanian wolf, more properly known as the Thylacine or Tasmanian tiger, was open bushland such as dry eucalypt forest or grasslands or even open wetlands.

From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However, fossil evidence from a long time ago indicates they once also lived on the Australian mainland and in New Guinea.

The last known thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September 1936.

How much does a Tasmanian wolf weigh?

The Tasmanian wolf, more correctly known as a Thylacine, or also the Tasmanian tiger, has been extinct since 1936.

It weighed between 15 and 30 kilograms, or 33 to 66 lb. The males were larger than females on average.

Did humans have to do anything to do with Tasmanian tigers dying?

Humans had everything to do with the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger (more correctly known as the Thylacine). It extinction essentially resulted after a bounty was put on it, for fear it would kill stock animals. This gave anyone a licence to kill these creatures.

Is the Tasmanian wolf still alive?

The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936.

It was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it as a livestock killer. Thylacines were blamed for numerous attacks on sheep and other livestock. This led to bounty hunters being paid in an effort to control their numbers. There were bounties placed on the Tasmanian wolf as early as 1830. Between 1888 and 1909 the government paid £1 per head for the animal (10 shillings for pups).

There is disputed evidence that a very small number may yet still exist in the Tasmanian wilderness, but nobody has seen, photographed or trapped one.

A recent attempt was made to clone one, but failed due to the DNA being of insufficient quality.


It is likely that several factors led to its decline and eventual extinction, including competition with wild dogs and erosion of habitat. The needs of captive thylacines were not understood, and many of them died due to exposure.

Fossil evidence shows that the Thylacine was once common throughout mainland Australia and even New Guinea. It is believed they became extinct on the Australian mainland due to not being able to compete with the dingo for food, once the dingo arrived from Asia.

What is the Tasmanian Wolf's niche?

The correct name for the Tasmanian wolf is Thylacine. It is also sometimes known (incorrectly) as the Tasmanian tiger.

The niche of the Thylacine, which is believed to be extinct, was a top-level predator. It was a predator at the top of the food chain in Australian bushland. It filled a similar niche to that of other canine predators such as wolves - hence its nickname.

How long have Tasmanian tigers been extinct?

The Tasmanian Tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, has not been seen since the last known specimen died in September 1936.

However, for a species to be declared extinct, fifty years must pass since a confirmed sighting. Therefore, the Thylacine was declared extinct by national standards in 1986.

When was the Tasmanian tiger's breeding season?

The breeding season for the Tasmanian tiger, more properly known as the Thylacine, was believed to be from winter to spring, although there are some indication that breeding may have taken place throughout the year. Little is known about this creature, which has been extinct since 1936.

How do Tasmanian wolves move?

The Tasmanian wolf or Tasmanian tiger, more properly known as the Thylacine, is now extinct. Prior to its extinction, it was a four-legged marsupial which ran and walked on all four legs.

Where does the Tasmanian tiger live?

The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, is no longer living anywhere, as far as is known. It was found in Australia, specifically on the island state of Tasmania, although ancient fossil remains have also been found on the mainland.

It was not a tiger, but a striped marsupial. Believed to be extinct since the 1930s, reports still come in (unconfirmed) of its continued existence.

When still living, the Thylacine lived in eucalyptus bushland, wetlands and grassland areas.

How did the Tasmanian tiger or thylacine become extinct?

The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936.

It was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it as a livestock killer. The government paid one pound for every dead adult thylacine head, and ten shillings for every dead thylacine pup head. Also, wild dogs that settlers brought in competed with the thylacines, reducing the prey of the thylacine.

The thylacine and Tasmanian devil both became extinct in mainland Australia hundreds of years earlier, probably because they were in competition with dingoes once the Aborigines came.

There is disputed evidence that a very small number may yet still exist in the Tasmanian wilderness, but nobody has seen, photographed or trapped one.

A recent attempt was made to clone one, but failed due to the DNA being of insufficient quality.

Further, it has been suggested that, in the early part of the Twentieth Century an extremely virulent disease began to spread first through the wild then captive populations. Exactly what this disease was remains unknown but it was described as being similar to but distinct from canine distemper. Another theory points to the fact that, by the time the Thylacine was confined to the island of Tasmania, the remaining specimens did not have sufficient genetic diversity to sustain the population. A similar problem is currently affecting the Tasmanian devil, resulting in the spread of the fatal DFTD, or Devil Facial Tumour Disease.

What time period did the Tasmanian tiger live in?

The Tasmanian tiger, more properly known as the Thylacine, and sometimes also called the Tasmanian wolf, was in existence up until 1936.