Wildfires

Occurring in many parts of the world, wildfires are extensive in size and spread quickly, leaving destruction in their paths. Questions in the Wildfires category include how wildfires start, statistics on wildfires, equipment and techniques used for fighting them, how to stay safe in the event of a wildfire, and more.

Asked by Kitty Schaden in Australia Natural Disasters, Wildfires, Australia

How did the Australia fires start?

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According to Diana Bernstein, climate scientist and Assistant Research Professor in the Division of Marine Science at the University of Southern Mississippi: “Apart from human activities, Australia’s hot and dry summers are to blame for the start and the spread of the wildfires." Although the region knows to expect a fire season, these most recent fires have been worse than most. This is because Australia is currently experiencing its worst drought in decades as well as a heatwave that broke the record for the highest nationwide average temperature in December. These elements combined have caused the fires to spread more rapidly than usual. Many experts also reference climate change as a contributing factor, as the increasingly extreme weather conditions are taking their toll on an already at-risk area. There is also the human element—there have already been 24 people charged with deliberately starting bushfires this season.
Asked in Wildfires

Why are wildfires good?

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They kill the plants and then the seeds fall down and more plants grow.
Asked in Earthquakes, Wildfires

How are wildfires measured?

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In the amount of acres they burn
Asked in Climatology and Climate Changes, Wildfires

Why can climates sometimes vary widely within a short distance?

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The reason why climate vary in small differences is because elevation. For example, the areas of high elevation on the Mexican Plateau can have surprisingly cool temperatures.
Asked in Wildfires

Why are wildfires bad?

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Well, they are bad because they harm people and burn trees down and even spread to different locations and forests.
Asked in Wildfires

Were there any fires on the 16th July 2015?

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Yes, there are always fires somewhere in the world.
Asked in Tornadoes, Wildfires, Natural Disasters

What happens after a fire tornado?

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A firewhirl can spread a fire to new locations fairly quickly, which can leave behind burnt-down structures and vegetation.
Asked in Car Fuses and Wiring, Mercury Grand Marquis, Wildfires

Where is the fuse box for a 1986 Mercury Marquis mid-size?

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remove plastic cover under steering column. It is held on with screws.
Asked in Home Electricity, Wildfires, Firefighters

What type of electrical heating is most cost effective for the home?

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All electrical heating is 100% efficient. Every nickel you spend is converted into usable heat unlike other sources, they just go up the chimmney. The type you choose depends on you and where you are. You can go baseboard, there is a calculation a qualified electrician will make for you so you get the right wattage per room. This relies on the convection current principle to circulate the warm air. You can get an electric arc furnace which uses forced air like the oil and gas one. They are very quiet, of course efficient and have the "feeling" of warmth because of the felt air. This of course is your option if you need central a/c as well. You can go with radiant heat panels in your ceiling that fit between the strapping on your rafters. So you have a clean sheet rock ceiling. Radiant panels don't heat the air, they heat objects in that room. You can also go with radiant heat inlaid in your flooring or subflooring heating the concrete, tiles, hardwood or whatever. So depending on where you live, you have to pick what's right for your locale. It's clean, it's cheaper than fuels, require zero maintenance, and you don't waste any of your money. Gotta like that. Andy Answer I think Andy must work for the power company. Electricity is most definitely not cheaper than gas, although with the way gas prices have been going, it might become that way. Electric resistance heat does indeed convert 100% of the incoming energy to heat. But per amount of incoming energy, you pay a lot more for electricity than you do for gas. You can get new gas furnaces that are 96% efficient. One can argue that 4% inneficiency is infinitely greater than 0% inneficiency, but unless the energy prices go totally topsy turvy, it still remains cheaper to heat with gas. One thing that is overlooked in the above arguments is that with both electric resistance heat and gas heat, the incoming energy must supply all of the heat. On the other hand, with a heat pump, the heat comes from the outside air, and the electricity is used only to move it inside. It works as an air conditioner in reverse. In this way, you can actually get more heat energy out than the energy coming into the house. The disadvantage is that heat pumps don't work if it gets too cold outside. The older ones would only work down to 0 degrees C, but I think some newer ones may work down to 0 degrees F. The answer to the question really depends on what the climate is where you live. There's a book by Tretheway that you may find at your public library, to go into detail on the pros and cons of various systems. A properly constructed well insulated house is the key to lower costs, no matter what you choose. Answer Going one step further, a geothermal heat pump should be most cost effective in the long run. These work just as in the second answer above, but the heat comes from ground water, which is a fairly constant temperature of about 55 degrees. This allows a much more efficient heat pump without the air temperature limits above. liquid is a great medium for heat transfer, so the heat exchanger is inside with a pump, not a big noisy fan.
Asked in Environmental Issues, History of Science, Wildfires

What impact does a wildfire have on humans or the environment?

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Wildlife and humans share a very deep chemistry. Wildfires in the first place, cause a lot of damage i.e. they destroy the soil present there and make land infertile. A great deal of natural habitat is lost, ecosystems are lost. Things necessary for man, for its daily purposes are lost such as wood, timber etc. It indirectly also causes economic turmoil for the people dependent on those products for their livelihood.