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Leland Grant

@lelandgrant

Joined in October 2019

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Onions and Garlic

How can you cut an onion without crying?

In order to prevent crying, it helps to understand why it happens. There is a chemical reaction that occurs when you cut an onion; you damage the onion's cells, and the enzyme (Syn-ropanethial-S-oxide) that escapes acts as a lachrymatory agent. When that agent hits your eyes, it mixes with your tears to make sulfuric acid, and your tear ducts activate in an attempt to wash out the contamination.

So, that being said:

  1. Wearing goggles is the most obvious answer. It may look a little silly, but it's the easiest way to prevent the onion's enzyme from reaching the eyes.
  2. Sharpening your knife beforehand limits the damage to the onion cells, thus releasing fewer gases.
  3. Spraying your cutting board with vinegar slows down the chemical reaction. It does, however, make your onions smell/taste like vinegar.
  4. Always placing the cut side down will minimize the chemicals released into the open air.
  5. Cutting onions under the kitchen vent will remove some of the chemicals from the air.
  6. And finally, try not to form an emotional bond with your onion.
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Earth Sciences

Why do flies rub their hands together?

Turns out flies are not actually criminal masterminds. They rub their limbs together to clean them, getting gunk like pollen and dust out of sensory receptors—taste receptors, interestingly enough. Those receptors clue the flies in to what kind of surface they've landed on, so it's pretty important to keep them functional. Kind of ironic that such gross insects would place such a high priority on staying clean, but there you go.

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Germany in WW2
Anne Frank

What is Anne Franks's income per year?

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Uncategorized
Celebrities

What political party does Simon o'brien's belong to?

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Politics and Government
Journalists

How happy is Susan Page?

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