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Can a runner back up on the bases between home and first base?


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Answered 2012-04-08 22:38:58

When proceeding to first a runner can not retreat towards home nor can they come to a complete stop of forward motion. If they do either of these the the runner is to be called out without need of a tag on the runner or the base. This only applies to a runner between home and first.

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NO. Base runner's must run the bases in the order they batted. If a runner overtakes another runner, he is automatically out.


Whenever there is no force play or you decide to tag him between bases. A force play is when the runner has to advance due to a runner behind him or batter. In this case he has to advance bases because if he stays there will be two people imon this base and the other person can't go back because if the same reason



No the runner is not out unless the first baseman tags him, the first baseman touches the bag before the runner there, or the runner steps out of the baseline. The runner could go back and forth on the base path for as long as he can stay safe. So simply, no the runner is not out yet.


The runner has to go back to the base he started on before the play. If he is able to run to the next base after that, he can, but he must have his foot on the bag AFTER the catch is made. If he has run past any other bases, he has to run back around, no short-cutting.


Yes. If the first baseman tags out the batter on his way to first, the three existing runners can return to their original bases; none can be "forced out."


No, in that situation the person with the ball would have to tag the runner for the runner to be out.


Yes. Once the runner that just batted is tagged out there is no longer a force out for the runner advancing to second. Therefore he can continue to second or go back to first.


The runner is also out and the ball is dead. All runners go back to previous bases.


The runner has to run back to first base before the ball is thrown to get her out. She has to tag back on first no matter if the ball was caught before she tagged second base or not. She has to tag back at first to be able to run to second or she will most likely be out.


Its a live ball if the ball goes back to the backstop he can throw to first or if he blocks the ball he can step on home and get the runner out on third.


If the batter is caught out there is no longer any forces at any base so the runner going to second can go back to first.


yes but they can be tagged on the base if the batter has not been out yet.


No, the pitcher stepped off the rubber and the runner was asleep(?) No, the pitcher stepped off the rubber and the runner was asleep(?)



Well, if by he leaves early you mean steal, and by hit you mean the ball is not caught, this is call a hit and run. Or The rule book takes a full page attempting to explain what to do in all possible situations when any runner leaves early before a hit. I will try to simplify it. It's not easy though. There is one loophole in the rule that allows the offense to go unpenalized. If a runner or runners are forced to advance and have left early and the batter gets a "clean" hit. No penalty is imposed. A "clean" hit means it was a single, double or triple in the umpire's judgment. If it was a hit and an error or an advance on the throw, the batter will be sent back to the base that was the scored value and all runners must go back to the bases they originally held or the one nearest the batter. Any time a base becomes available after a hit, runners will be sent back. Here are some basic keys that help simplify the rule: 1. If one runner is guilty they are all guilty. 2. You move the batter-runner back to where you judge the value of the clean hit. Any advance made by him, beyond his scored hit, is nullified. 3. Place all runners back on their original bases whenever possible. Put them as close as possible to the batter-runner after placing the batter-runner at the base judged to be the clean hit. 4. If any bases become empty due to any runner or the batter-runner being put out, return the runners to those bases. EXAMPLE: Bases loaded, no outs. Batter hits a "clean" double, and tries for third thinking the throw is going home. The throw is cut-off and they get him out at third. Before the hit a runner left early. Guess what? The batter is out and ALL runners return. Because his out left bases empty, you put all runners back to their original bases. In that same play, if the out on the batter had been the third out, no runs would count due to the fact that they could have been put back if it had not been the third out. When a runner leaves early he remains guilty even if he returns before or after a hit. EXAMPLE: A runner on 2nd leaves early, then a fly ball is hit to right field. The runner retouches after the catch and heads for 3rd. The throw gets past F5 and the runner scores. RULING: You put the runner back on second. They love that call too!


He does if he can get back and touch it in time before a fielder does. If the runner makes no attempt to return to the base and a fielder touches it and appeals, the runner is out.


Yes. A runner who is picked off first can instead try to take second. This will often happen on a slow move by a left handed pitcher, where the runner thinks the pitcher is throwing home. Sometimes the runner makes it in this case, in which case it is scored as a stolen base. The first baseman often needs to take a few steps towards the pitcher rather than wait at first base for the ball to arrive in order to have enough time to throw out the runner.


It doesn't count unless all the bases are touched. They would have to go back. So you can't score the run if a base is missed.


Only if it is ruled interference by the umpire -- dead ball and runner is out, no other runners advance.... if no interference is called, this is a live ball



Yes. The fielder covering the base does NOT have to tag the runner. The runner is forced out when the fielder steps on the base before the runner can make it back. Got that.


The runner is out. If there is any question, the player should ask the umpire or his coach, not an opposing player.


He is out for interfering with a thrown ball while running out of the baseline. The same is true with a runner running to first base. Tom Seaver said that when he saw a runner running to first in fair territory he would throw the ball into his back to get the quick out.



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