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Do they switch balls after seven pitches in MLB?

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2006-01-03 21:07:00
2006-01-03 21:07:00

The home plate umpire is responsible for making sure the ball is always as clean as possible. If it gets stained or scuffed by being fouled off in the dirt or grass or whatever, the ump replaces it. This has an unfortunate history--Ray Chapman of the Indians was struck in the head in 1920 and died shortly after. So there is no set number of pitches, but 7 would likely be the upper limit. Either the stains become too much or it gets fouled off, or knocked out of the park.

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