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Percentages, Fractions, and Decimal Values

How do you explain a method to compare fractions?

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Answered 2017-10-29 01:27:13

Convert them to decimals and order them least to greatest.

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The usual method is to convert the fractions to equivalent fractions with a common denominator. Then you can simply compare the numerators. You can also convert each of the fractions to a decimal - this can easily be done with a calculator, simply divide the numerator by the denominator.



Because when you compare fractions with the same denominators, you do not have to find the least common denominator (LCM or LCD).


You can either convert fractions to decimals and compare the decimal numbers; find equivalent fractions with the same denominator and then compare numerators or find equivalent fractions with the same numerator and then compare denominators.


To compare two fractions, convert them to a common denominator.To compare two fractions, convert them to a common denominator.To compare two fractions, convert them to a common denominator.To compare two fractions, convert them to a common denominator.


Two ways: convert them to decimals or convert them to similar fractions and compare the numerators.


You can compare similar fractions by looking at their numerators. You can compare dissimilar fractions by converting them to similar fractions and looking at their numerators. You can convert a dissimilar fraction to a similar fraction by finding the least common denominator.


You cannot compare fractions by using the GCF since GCF determines the common factors of both fractions. Instead, use the LCD to compare the fractions. Find the LCM of the denominator terms of the fractions. Then, obtain the fractions with the common denominators. Finally, compare the numerator values to determine which fraction is the greatest/least.


Decimals and percentages are easier to compare than fractions - particularly if they are unlike fractions. That does not explain why percentages are required when we have decimal number and there is no good answer to that!


you have to compare the common fractions


To compare two fractions, find a common denominator, then convert each fraction to equivalent fractions with that common denominator. Finally, you compare the numerators. 5/6


To compare fractions, convert both of them to a common denominator.


Find the equivalent fractions with the same denominator (the least common multiple) and then compare the numerators.


Change the fractions to the same denominator then compare.A quick way is to multiply UP on cross multiply and compare.


It may be simplest to convert them all to a common form: rational fractions, decimal fractions or percentages and then compare them. When you are more expert, you may be able to convert them pairwise into a common basis and compare.


Before adding or subtracting two fractions they are converted into like fractions. Explain with examples why this is necessary.



To compare fractions, convert them to a common denominator - in this case, a denominator of 8 will work.To compare fractions, convert them to a common denominator - in this case, a denominator of 8 will work.To compare fractions, convert them to a common denominator - in this case, a denominator of 8 will work.To compare fractions, convert them to a common denominator - in this case, a denominator of 8 will work.


change them to decimals


Possible reasons: To add or subtract fractions, To compare fractions with different denominators.


They are fractions which a user is familiar with or comfortable with, and which can be used to compare a given fraction.


Only Fractions with a Common Denominator can be directly compared.


The fractions can be ordered according to the order of their numerators.


It's easier to compare 1/3 and 1/4 when you convert them to the equivalent fractions 4/12 and 3/12


You either convert the fractions to a common denominator, and then compare, or you convert them to their decimal equivalent and then compare. The latter can quickly be done with a calculator.



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