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Answered 2007-10-16 14:24:00

A baserunner on 1st is not forced unless the batter hits a ground ball, a base hit on a fielding error (he is also forced to advance on a walk, hit batter, catcher interference, etc.). The runner is not forced on a fly ball unless it is dropped or falls in for a hit. If a fly ball is caught, the runner is not forced, but may choose to "tag up" and try to advance to 2nd after the catch. If a fly ball is dropped, the runner need not tag up before advancing to 2nd. THEY CAN RISK IT...BUT IF THE BALL IS CAUGHT HE HAS TO GET BACK TO FIRST BASE.....OR IT WILL BE A DOUBLE PLAY....BUT THEY DONT HAVE TO TAG UP Just to clarify. If a fly ball is caught, the runner on 1st may try to advance, but to do so, he must be on 1st base, or return and touch 1st base, before attempting to advance. The "tag up" must take place after the ball is caught by the fielder.

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Yes. A runner may tagup and attempt to advance after any fly ball is caught, regardless of whether it is fair or foul.



That depends on whether a runner is forced to vacate a base when a ground ball is hit. If there is a runner on first base and a ground ball is hit, the runner is forced to run to second base because the batter is running to first base. If there is also a runner on second base, that runner is forced to run to third because the runner from first is running to second. If a runner is not forced to run, they do not have to. If there are runners on first base and third base and a ground ball is hit, the runner at first is forced to run to second because the batter is running to first. But the runner on third is not forced to run because no runner is running to third base from second base.


Yes all the other bases are a force out. The runner going to first forces the runner at first to second. The runner at first forces the runner at second to third. The runner at second forces the runner at third to home. You only have to tag the runner when a runner that was "forcing" you (from a previous base) is out. In the scenario you have mentioned the only time the third baseman would have had to tag the runner from second to third would be if the initial force out was behind the runner at either at first or second (the putout thus not forcing the runner from second to third, which would now require a tag. If the initial force out was at first or second, the runner on second would have the choice of going to third or retreating to second, and not "forced" to run. Since the initial force out was at home, the runner from second to third is still being "forced" to run by the runners behind him. Make sense?


A tag play is when it is required to tag a base runner to get them out. A force play is when it is required to have possession of the ball and touch the base to get the base runner out. By definition, a force play is in effect when a base runner is 'forced' to run to the next base because of the ball being hit and another runner being 'forced' to run to the base that the runner currently occupies. If there is a runner on first base and the batter hits a ground ball to third base, the runner on first base is 'forced' to run to second base because the batter is running to first base. In this case, a force play is in effect at second base (and at first base because a batter is always 'forced' to run to first base after hitting a fair ball. A force play is always in effect at first base when a batter hits a fair ball.). If there is a runner only on second base and the batter hits a ball to first base, the runner at second is not 'forced' to run to third base because no one is 'forced' to run to second base. In this case, a tag play is in effect at third base if the runner at second attempts to advance.


When a runner is on a base that a batter or another base runner is required to run to, the former is forced to run to the next base. Two examples and a counter-example: 1) A runner begins the play on first base, and the ball is batted fair. Since the batter is required to go to first base, the runner that began on that base is forced to go to second base, and remains required to do so until the batter is out. 2) Runners begin the play on first base and on second base, and the ball is batted fair. As noted in example (1), the runner on first base is forced to go to second. Thus, the runner that began on second is now forced to go to third base. If either the batter or the runner that began on first base become out, then this requirement is cancelled. 3) A runner begins the play on third base, and the ball is batted fair. The runner MAY advance from third towards home, but is not FORCED to do so. That's because the batter is only required to run to first, and there is no requirement that the runner on third leave his base.




If the first baseman tags first base, the runner originally on first is therefore not forced to second base and he is safe at first.


I'll be honest that I'm unaware of the rules specific to the league, but generally speaking, a batter-runner advances on a walk only when he is forced to do so by a trailing batter-runner. If a runner chooses to advance when not forced to do so, he is allowed, but is liable for being tagged out as if he were stealing a base.


In my league, if the pop fly was caught as the second out, and the runner on first wasn't forced out, then if the runner on third gets home before the other runner is out, then he/she is considered safe. So basically.. if its not a forced play, and the runner gets home before the out, then yes. The run counts. But that may not be every league.


If the runner remains standing on the bag when the 1st baseman touches the bag and the 1st baseman does not tag the runner prior to touching the bag, then the runner is safe and you have no double play. Answer To clarify, once the Batter becomes a batter-runner, the runner at first loses his right to occupy first base and is forced to advance. If he is tagged while standing on the base, he is out. If the first baseman then steps on first base the Batter-runner is also out -- Double Play. BUT, if the first baseman first steps on the base the batter-runner is out and the force is removed. If the runner standing on first base is now tagged he is safe.


Lead runner has the right to the bag as long as they are not being forced ahead by occupants of other bases. If the runner on 3rd was not being forced they can return to the bag and the runner from 2nd must return to 2nd. The runner returning to second if tagged is out and unless the runner returning to 3rd is tagged while off the base then they are safe. If both runner attempt to occupy the base at the same time and fielder tags both runners while they occupy the base the runner from 2nd is out unless they are being forced ahead then the runner from 3rd is out.


If the runner at second is out by being forced out, the batter is not given a base hit .... the play is ruled the same as if the ball was hit to an infielder that threw to second to force the runner. If the runner at second is out by being tagged because they rounded the base too far, the batter is given a base hit.


Once the batter/runner is forced out at 1st base, the force out of all other base runners is no longer in effect. Therefore, even if the original runner at 1st falls, he must be tagged out. He could, in fact, return to first and be safe there if he is not tagged out.


If the runner touches second base frist, then yes. He would the technically be on his way to third base, and no longer forced. If he has yet to touch second, then no. He would still be on his way to second and therefore "forced". He can be tagged or you could just step on second.


No. But this rule does not come into effect until AFTER the force out at first base occurs. In other words, until that force out at first happens, the runner who was on first must advance. But AFTER the force out occurs, the runner who was on first need not do so. If a first baseman steps on first and then immediately fires to second base, the person covering second base must tag out the runner coming towards second base. I've seen twenty-year veterans of MLB forget this -- they take the throw from the first baseman after a force out at first base, step on second base, and then walk away without tagging the runner.


A force play is when the runner on a base is forced to run ahead to the next base when the batter gets a hit. For example, if the batter hits a fair ground ball and there's a runner on first, there is a force play at second because the girl at first is forced to run ahead since the batter is running to first, causing a chain reaction. When in a force play, it is not necessary to tag the runner that is being forced to run ahead since you can just touch the base that they are going to. (in the example above, you could just touch second before the runner gets there and they would be out) If it wasn't a force play, (like if there was only a runner on second) then you would have to tag the girl to get her out. Touching the bag before her wouldn't get her out because she has the option to stay at second.


NO. Base runner's must run the bases in the order they batted. If a runner overtakes another runner, he is automatically out.


== Answer== It depends, If the batter hits a fly ball that is caught with less than two outs the original man on second is safe. If the runner from first can return to first before a defensive player can touch it with the ball he is also safe. If a ground ball is hit with less than two outs both runners are forced to advance. As long as the guy from first gets there before the ball he is safe and the original runner is out.


No. After ball four is thrown to the batter it is a base on balls. The batter is entitled to first base, and any base runner forced ahead may advance. Even if the runner on first is attempting to steal on the pitch, he is awarded second base and cannot be thrown out. Of course the runner from first is award second base, but is only protected up to the base. If he overruns or overslides the second base because in his steal attempt he was not paying attention, he can be tagged out if he is off the bag.


Provided that there were no runner on 1st base and batter reached 1st before runner were tagged out, this is a hit. Batter alreay had first base, runner chose to go to 3rd, not forced. If he were forced, then it is a fielders choice.


When a batter is hit with a ball, it is a dead ball. Runners may advance to the next based only if they are forced to do so (e.g. If there are runners on first and third, only the runner on first may advance because they are 'forced' to go to second. The runner on third remains on third).


Well for example: If a runner is on first and second, and the batter hits the ball, the force play is at third base because the lead runner is forced to run to third due to the runners behind him/her.


Yes. Once the runner that just batted is tagged out there is no longer a force out for the runner advancing to second. Therefore he can continue to second or go back to first.



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