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Answered 2010-12-18 03:06:26

If the U.S. Supreme Court denies a petition for a writ of certiorari (a request to hear a case on appeal), then the decision of the lower court is final.

Denial of certiorari occurs in 98-99% of cases, and in no way implies that the court agrees with the lower court's decision. Denial only means that the case, as presented, isn't of sufficient importance to warrant a review, doesn't involve constitutional issues, conforms to a precedent already set, falls outside the court's jurisdiction, or is moot, etc.

Between 7,500 and 8,500 cases are presented for review each year, but the court can only choose 80-150 to hear, so the Justices have to limit themselves to those cases that have the greatest impact on the law and on society.

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Yes. Due to the volume of petitions, the Supreme Court denies 98-99% of them.


You could file a petition for reconsideration; however, this is unlikely to be successful. Typically, when the US Supreme Court denies certiorari, the decision of the last appellate court to rule on the case becomes final, and the matter is considered res judicata (legally concluded).


can Cases reach the Supreme Court through certificate and writ of certiorari.


The US Supreme Court traditionally issues a writ of certiorari, an order to the lower court to send the records for the case under review. Although the Court still grants and denies certiorari, they seldom issue an actual court order for records anymore; this function is now handled administratively by the Clerk of Court.


The US Supreme Court traditionally issues a writ of certiorari, an order to the lower court to send the records for the case under review. Although the Court still grants and denies certiorari, they seldom issue an actual court order for records anymore; this function is now handled administratively by the Clerk of Court.



AnswerCase files and briefs.Contrary to popular belief, the Supreme Court does not receive a Writ of Certiorari when it accepts a case; the court issues a Writ of Certiorari, which is an order to the lower courts to send case records to the US Supreme Court for review.ExplanationA formal request for review by the US Supreme Court is called a petition for a writ of certiorari. If the Supreme Court agrees to hear the case, they grant certiorariand issue a writ of certiorari to the lower court.A writ of certiorari is an order from a higher appellate court to a lower court demanding a certified record of a particular case so the higher court (in this case, the US Supreme Court) can review the lower court's decision.When the lower court receives the writ, they send the case files to the Court. Meanwhile, the attorneys for both parties submit briefs, documents that present the points and arguments for each side of the case.The Supreme Court receives a petition for a writ of certiorari from one party to the case.The Supreme Court decides whether to hear the case: if they agree, they grant certiorari; if they refuse, they deny certiorari.If the Supreme Court grants certiorari, it sends a writ of certiorari to the lower court.The Supreme Court receives case files from the lower court.The Supreme Court receives briefs from the parties to the case.The Supreme Court may receive other documents, such as amicus briefs, etc.


Most petitions for Writ of Certiorari are denied. For more information, see Related Questions, below.



When it comes to granting a petition for a writ of certiorari, the U.S. Supreme Court applies the Rule of Four.


A Writ of Certiorari is requested when the supreme Court is going to hear the appeal of an order from a lower court. In Latin the term certiorari means to be informed of.


A petition for a writ of certiorari, or request for the Supreme Court to consider their case on appeal and issue a writ of certiorari to the lower (usually appellate) court. A writ of certiorari is a court order requesting the official records for a specified case.


The Court grants certiorari to the petitioner, and issues a writ of certiorari to the lower court, asking for the case files.


When an application (or appeal of some case in a lower court) to the Supreme Court is denied, it is called certiorari denied. In fact, it means that the Supreme Court refuses to accept the application or appeal and will not judge on it


When the US Supreme Court issues a writ of certiorari (an order to the lower court to send up records), it indicates they have agreed to review the case under their appellate jurisdiction.


A writ of certiorari is the Supreme Court's equivalent of an appeals case in lower courts. In this process four of nine Supreme Court justices must agree that there is sufficient evidence to hear the case. If they do agree to go forward, a writ of certiorari is then created.


To be heard in the supreme court, one must file a writ of certiorari, which the court must grant.


A petition for a writ of certiorari. If the Supreme Court agrees to hear the case, they grant cert(iorari); otherwise, they issue an order declare cert(iorari) denied. After the Court accepts a case, it issues a writ of certiorari to the last court to handle the case, ordering the relevant files be sent to the Supreme Court. The case itself is said to be "on certiorari from [name of lower court]" (e.g., On certiorari from the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit).For more information, see Related Questions, below.


A writ of certiorari is issued under appellate jurisdiction, most often by the Supreme Court.


There have been tens of thousands of writs of certiorari granted in the history of the US Supreme Court.


It means that the court has determined that the case does not meet the merits of being argued in the Supreme Court and the appeal is denied.


The US Supreme Court issues a writ of certiorari, or an order to the court from which the case is being appealed, to send the case records to the Supreme Court.In reality, the Supreme Court no longer issues a formal writ after granting certiorari; requesting files is now an administrative procedure handled by the Clerk of Court as a matter of routine.


The Supreme Court applies the traditional "rule of four" that prescribes at least four justices must agree to hear the case in order for the Court to grant certiorari.


Yes, they can.However, if the decision involves a question of federal or constitutional law and the case is petitioned to the US Supreme Court for a writ of certiorari, and if the U.S. Supreme Court grants certiorari, and if the U.S. Supreme Court rules differently from the state supreme court, the state is bound by the U.S. Supreme Court decision under the doctrine of Stare decisis, which is abbreviated from a Latin phrase that means "let the decision stand."


Certiorari Denied or denied certiorari, usually abbreviated as cert. denied.