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Answered 2012-05-29 20:45:06

When you increase the number of trials of an aleatory experiment, the experimental

probability that is based on the number of trials will approach the theoretical

probability.

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Related Questions

What happens to experimental probability as the number of trials increases?

The probability from experimental outcomes will approach theoretical probability as the number of trials increases. See related question about 43 out of 53 for a theoretical probability of 0.50


What actually happens in probability is what probability?

It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.It is experimental probability.


What is expirimental probability?

Experimental probability is what actually happens in the real world. For example, if you played a game 60 times where you flip a coin and heads scores a point, theoretically you should get 30 points, right? Well, experimental probability is the actual results. In fact, your experimental probability for that game could even be 45 points scored in 60 tries. just remember: theoretical=in a perfect math world; experimental=real world results.


Why is theoretical probability called theoretical probability?

It is the theory of what might happen, but not actually what happens. In theory, if you spin a coin 100 times, it should come up on heads 50 times, as there is a 1 in 2 chance of you getting heads on each spin. If you actually do spin a coin 100 times, the total of heads is the experimental probability, so what you actually get. That may not be 50. It is likely to be close to 50 though.


If you were to perform the experiment 1000 times how would the experimental probality compare to the theoretical probality?

In order to answer this question it is important, first, to be certain that the theoretical probability (not probality!) can be calculated. For example, there is a probability that the first car that I see being driven on the next day [tomorrow] is black but I challenge anyone to calculate the theoretical probability. No one, not even I, know when I will wake up tomorrow (assuming that I live to wake up), when I draw my curtains and when look into the street. The number of black cars and non-black cars in my locality can be found, but it could be a car from somewhere else which just happens to drive past at the critical moment.Assuming there was a theoretical probability, the experimental probability would be better than would be obtained from 999 trials and not as good as 1001 trials. Any other statements would depend on the distribution of the variable being observed.


What happens to the probability of observing a t-random variable between -2 and 2 as you increase the degrees of freedom?

The probability increases.The probability increases.The probability increases.The probability increases.


What does estimated experimental probability mean please someone answer?

One way of finding the probability is to carry out an experiment repeatedly. Then the estimated experimental probability is the proportion of the total number of repeated trials in which the desired outcome occurs.Suppose, for example you have a loaded die and want to find the probability of rolling a six. You roll it again and again keeping a count of the total number of rolls (n) and the number of rolls which resulted in a six, x. The estimated experimental probability of rolling a six is x/n.


What happens when experimental probability is repeated?

You obtain an estimate of the probability that will usually be different from previous result(s).You obtain an estimate of the probability that will usually be different from previous result(s).You obtain an estimate of the probability that will usually be different from previous result(s).You obtain an estimate of the probability that will usually be different from previous result(s).


What happens if the probability of success is low in sports?

The sportsmen/women become more motivated, which may increase the chance. But they'll probably lose anyway.


What would be the probability of a chemical threat?

The probability of a threat is 1. The threat exists. What is important is not the threat but the probability that the threatened event happens.



What is the probability that it will snow in Alaska at least once a year?

The probability is 1 because it happens every year.


What happens to the probability as the number of trials increases?

Probability becomes more accurate the more trials there are.


Why is it important to have a control group in a experiment?

A control group is the standard of comparison between what happens with the experimental variable and without the experimental variable.


How often something happens divided by all outcomes is called?

The probability of whatever it was that happens.


What is theoretical research?

Theoretical research is research that happens only in theory as opposed to in practice, i.e. you pretend that it's happening to examine or justify the consequences.


How do you use Experimental Bias in a complete sentence?

Scientists try to control for experimental bias.An experimental bias often goes unrecognized if the student does not carefully consider sources of potential biases.A desire for a specific outcome is an experimental bias.


Can 1.290994449 be a probability?

No. Probability is measured on a score of 0 to 1, which represents 0% (can never happen) to 100% (always happens).


What happens if your rat breaks its leg?

there is a big probability that it will die.


What happens when you increase voltage?

when you increase voltage the curent must also increase.


What is the describing of the complementary event and find its probability?

Suppose there is an event A and the probability of A happening is Pr(A). Then the complementary event is that A does not happen or that "not-A" happens: this is often denoted by A'.Then Pr(A') = 1 - Pr(A).Suppose there is an event A and the probability of A happening is Pr(A). Then the complementary event is that A does not happen or that "not-A" happens: this is often denoted by A'.Then Pr(A') = 1 - Pr(A).Suppose there is an event A and the probability of A happening is Pr(A). Then the complementary event is that A does not happen or that "not-A" happens: this is often denoted by A'.Then Pr(A') = 1 - Pr(A).Suppose there is an event A and the probability of A happening is Pr(A). Then the complementary event is that A does not happen or that "not-A" happens: this is often denoted by A'.Then Pr(A') = 1 - Pr(A).


What is the relationship between Control and experimental groups?

control groups are those which you keep constant you don't do anything to them and experimental groups are the ones which you are adding something to it to see what happens


What happens to the solubility of gases with the increase in temperature?

Solubility of gases increase with increase in temperature



What happens as the activation energy increases?

The probability that a chemical reaction to occur increases.


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