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Why is a pitcher not charged with an earned run if he commits an error?

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2016-03-01 01:02:09
2016-03-01 01:02:09
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No, a wild pitch is a wild pitch -- it is considered a mistake charged to the pitcher. An "error" in baseball is a fielding mistake. A pitcher can make an "error" but only on a batted or thrown ball.


No, this would not be an error it would be ruled a wild pitch or passed ball, neither of which are charged with errors


Generally yes...if a pitcher walks a batter and he comes around to score, that is an earned run against the pitcher, unless he scores on an error Bases loaded walks that score a run also count as an earned run against the pitcher that allowed the man on third to reach base, unless he reached base on an error


E.R.A. stands for Earned Run Average. It is the average earned runs scored upon a pitcher per nine innings of work. It is called Earned because if a fielder makes an error allowing a runner to advance a base and that runner eventually scores, that run will not be charged to the pitcher's E.R.A.


In baseball, an earned run is any run for which the pitcher is held accountable (i.e. the run did not score as a result of a fielding error or a passed ball).Now, if the pitcher threw 4 wild pitches (a much more likely scenario) it would be an earned run.I like booooobies and pigs




Under most circumstances, this would be an earned run, provided he eventually scores. However, there are a few cases where it would not be an earned run. One example would be if the inning is extended by an error, no runs scored after that error are earned.


Yes, if the ball is pitched in a location where the catcher has a reasonable chance of stopping the ball, that is a passed ball and the error is charged to the catcher. If the ball is pitched in a location where the catcher does NOT have a reasonable chance of stopping the ball, that is a wild pitch and the error is charged to the pitcher. Actually, a passed ball is NOT charged as an error against the catcher. It's simply charged as a passed ball. Not terribly logical, I agree, but that's the rule.


if there is two outs and the error would have meant the third out, then no earned runs will be charged. In all other cases, any runner who reached base on an error will not be considered an earned run ( the batter will be an earned run if the error was not supposed to be the third out.) Any runner who reaches base on a hit or walk but advances a base because of an error will still be considered an earned run when the homerun is hit (including runners who already scored on errors)


No anybody that's on because of an error is an unearned run no matter how they score


Earned runs are runs that are scored because of hits stolen bases. Un-earned runs are those where a runner gets on base because of an error and eventually scores. The earned run average (ERA) is calculated by taking the total number of earned runs scored against a pitcher and dividing that by the total number of innings that pitcher pitched. The lower the ERA the better the pitcher, usually.


If a relief pitcher enters the game with a 2 ball 0 strikes on the batter and the batter receives a base on balls it is charged to the preceding pitcher. Any other action such as a base hit, fielder's choice, reaching base on an error, etc., is charged to the relief pitcher. (Rule 10.18 (g)).


A hurler is a slang term for a pitcher in baseball. ERA stands for Earned Run Average and is a statistic for pitchers that shows the number of 'earned' runs a pitcher allows for every nine innings. An earned run is a run that is scored without the help of an error or passed ball. One might think that the earned run average of a pitcher is similar to that of the batting average of a hitter.


Probably. only earned runs count against an ERA so it depends if it was the pitchers fault that the runner got on. If he got on because of a walk, hit, or HBP then yes it counts. If he got on cause of an error then no. Yes it would. Unless of course, the previous criteria are met. Also, it wouldn't be charged to the current pitcher if the pitcher that allowed him to get on base was taken from the game. The pitcher that left would be responsible for the runner if he got on without an error.


No, it is not an earned run. From the offical Major League Rule Book: Rule 10.16(a) Comment: The following are examples of earned runs charged to a pitcher: (1) Peter pitches and retires Abel and Baker, the first two batters of an inning. Charlie reaches first base on an error charged to a fielder. Daniel hits a home run. Edward hits a home run. Peter retires Frank to end the inning. Three runs have scored, but no earned runs are charged to Peter, because Charlie should have been the third out of the inning as resconstructed without the error.


No. Any base runner that gets on base and scores is charged to the pitcher that pitched to him, regardless whether the batter reached base by a force out, error, catcher's interference,etc.


A run that the pitcher has given up. Unearned runs are caused by errors. Anything else that scores that isn't the result of a error, is a earned run. Walks, hits, sacrifices, balks, etc. are all examples of what can cause a earned run.


Yes. Once the pitched ball is batted, a pitcher becomes a fielder. If he makes an attempt to field a ball and rightfully should be able to score a putout but fails, he can be charged a fielding error. One example would be a bunted ball where the pitchers moves to pick it up with his glove, but instead hits it away from himself, allowing the batter-runner to safely reach first base. The pitcher made an attempt to field the ball and should have had the batter out, but he failed.


An ER is an Earned Run, a run for which the pitcher is considered responsible, as opposed to an Unearned Run, which involves an error (or passed ball) by one of the fielders.


Assume 3 players in a row hit singles, and the bases are loaded. The pitcher walks the batter and the first player scores. Since he hit a single, his is an earned run. Now imagine a different situation, where the first player got on base due to an error. Then the next two players hit singles and the bases are loaded. If the pitcher walks the 4th player, the 1st player scores but his is an unearned run. That is, the run is not counted against the pitcher since an error by someone else led to his being on base. Now imagine the next batter gets on due to an error and another run scored. This is the 2nd player, who had a single earler. His is an earned run. Every player on base could become an earned or unearned run, depending on how they got on base-- not how they eventually scored.


The official scorer would have to determine if the throw was catchable. If the throw was, then the error would be on the first baseman and he would be charged as such. If on the other hand the throw was a bad one and the first baseman had to reach and could not catch the ball, then the error is on the pitcher. Only one error would be charged even though the base runner advanced two base and scored.


No. No error can ever be given when there is an out made on the play.


Yes it is The only time a run scored is not counted as an earned run is if the base runner reached base on an error. Hit, walk or hit by pitch count as earned runs even if errors are committed after the runner reaches base.


Yes. Any defensive player can make an error.



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