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2014-08-26 16:13:00
2014-08-26 16:13:00

Absolute humidity refers to the amount of water vapor that exists in a given volume of air at a given time. Relative humidity is absolute humidity relative to the maximum humidity for the current temperature.

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Yes. Humidity represents the amount of water vapor that exists for a given temperature, pressure, and volume. As humidity increases, the evaporation rate will decrease.


Water vapor in the air compared to the amount of water vapor that air could hold at a given temperature.


A hygrometer measures the amount of water vapor in the air, or humidity. The higher the temperature, the more water vapor air can hold. The amount of water vapor in the air compared to what it can hold at a given temperature is called relative humidity. Relative humidity is given as a percent.


SATURATION vapor pressure would be higher in warm air. Vapor pressure indicates the amount of moisture actually in the air, and we don't actually know that.


Relative humidity is directly related to the amount of water vapor in air, and that's the relationship. The more water vapor that is in the air, the higher the relative humidity at a given temperature.


Humidity is the amount of water vapor at any given time and relative humidity is the amount of water vapor in the air compared to the greatest amount it can hold at that air temperature.



Is the percentage of water vapor that is actually in the air compared to the maximum amount of water vapor the air can hold at a particular temperature.


Saturation is the maximum capacity of moisture that air can hold at a given time. When air becomes saturated by water vapor, humidity has reached 100%.


excuse me the spelling is wrong it is humidity it means the amount of water vapor in the air at the given time


Humidity is the amount of water vapor in the air at a given time. At warm temperatures, air can hold more moisture than it can at cold temperatures.


It is the maximum humidity, expressed as the saturation point for a given temperature.


Humidity (relative) is the amount of water vapor in the air, expressed as a percentage of the maximum amount that the air could hold at the given temperature; the ratio of the actual water vapor pressure to the saturation vapor pressure. So pretty much the air is moist and heavy.


The amount of water vapor in the atmosphere varies from place to place. Humidity is the term used to describe the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere.


The majority of the water on the planet Mars is frozen deep beneath the surface. A small amount of water exists in the atmosphere in the form of vapor.


Let's do a quick review of some facts about water vapor in air, and then we'll tackle this question. An air mass will have a given temperature and a given pressure. For air of a given temperature and pressure, only a certain amount of water vapor can be "suspended" in that air before it begins to condense and precipitate out (as rain, snow or something else). When the amount of water vapor in the air is at it maximum (for whatever temperature and pressure we cite), that air has 100% of the water vapor in it that it can hold. Any more water vapor and water will condense and precipitate out, as we stated. That's all we need to know to take on this question.When we consider the amount of water vapor in a given air mass, we use a "standard" or and "index" to relate that amount of water vapor to something "fixed" to make our measurement. The reference in this case will be the maximum amount of water vapor that an air mass can hold at that temperature and pressure (whatever they are). In the case of this question, if the relative humidity of an air mass is 70%, that air mass (whatever its temperature and pressure) is holding 70% of the water vapor that it can possibly hold. Note that term we use is relative humidity. The "amount" of humidity in an air mass that has a relative humidity of 70% is 7/10ths (70%) of the amount of water vapor that it can possibly hold altogether. We've compared the amount of water vapor in the air to the maximum amount of vapor that it can hold.While it is true that an air mass may have this or that temperature and pressure, in any given air mass of whatever temperature and pressure, there is some maximum amount of water vapor that it can hold, and when we look at the amount of water vapor in that air mass, we compare it to that maximum amount that it can hold. That's relatively humidity, and when relative humidity reaches 100%, that air is saturated with water vapor and we can expect it to begin to precipitate out in the form of rain or another form of precipitation (depending on temperature and conditions aloft).It might help to note that warmer air and air at higher pressure can hold relatively more water vapor that cooler, less "pressurized" (less dense) air. But whatever the temperature and pressure of an air mass, there is some maximum amount of water vapor that it can hold, and we look at how much is in it, and compare that to the maximum amount, and call the comparison the relative humidity.


Water vapor in the air is called humidity. The actual amount is called the absolute humidity and can be expressed as grams per kilogram of air, or grams per cubic meter at standard pressure.



The amount of water actually contained in air compared to the amount it could contain is known as relative humidity.



pressure exerted by a vapor confined within a given space


Relative humidity is a ratio of the actual water vapor content of the air to the amount of water vapor needed to reach saturation. Absolute humidity is the mass of water vapor contained in a given volume of air.


The amount of water vapor in air varies based on the temperature and density of air. The amount of water vapor ranges from a trace amount up to 4%.



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