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Answered 2006-09-10 17:10:52

Yes, if the judgment was renewed before the expiration date.

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7 years. Most judgments are renewable and can be reentered on a credit report if they are not paid or settled.


The state of residence is not applicable when it relates to credit reports. A judgment will remain on the CR for seven years, but judgments are renewable and therefore if it is renewed it can be reentered on the judgment debtor's CR


7 years. Most judgments are renewable and can be reentered on a CR when that is done.


Seven years, but most judgments are renewable and can be reentered on the credit report at the time of renewal.


Eviction judgments are removed after the required 7 years have elapsed. In some instances, if the eviction resulted in a judgment and said judgment is renewable it can be reentered on the debtor's CR when renewed.


Bankruptcy. Bankruptcy will not remove a judgment from the debtor's credit report. The judgment will still remain for the required time if it is discharged in bankruptcy, settled or paid in full. Valid judgments remain for the required 7 years. Most judgments are renewable and can be reentered on the debtor's credit report whenever that action is taken.


The majority of judgments are renewable and therefore can remain a part of public records indefinitely. A judgment will remain on a credit report for the required seven years and when/if it is renewed it can be reentered on the CR.


Yes, more than likely it will be reentered on the CR. Many judgments are renewable and therefore can remain on a report an indefinite period of time.


Judgments will remain on the debtor's CR for seven years or until the SOL expires from the time of execution. An SOL if applicable is established by the terms of the judgment writ not by the SOL of the state regarding debt collection. The majority of judgments are renewable in the sense that once the 7 years expire the judgment holder can, if the judgment remains valid have it reentered on the judgment debtor's credit report.


Valid judgments remain on the debtor's credit report for seven (7)years. They cannot be expunged before that time. If the debtorpays or settlesa standing judgment it will be marked"satisfied" itwill, however, remainfor the required time limit. Most judgments are renewable. When a judgment is renewed it can be reentered on the judgment debtor's credit report. If that happens it will remain for another seven (7) years until paid. This is only one of several reasons why judgment/liens are extremely damaging for a judgment creditor.


Judgments and other negative information that is valid cannot be removed from a credit report until the required time limit of 7 years (usually from the DLA) has expired. Most judgments are renewable and therefore can be reentered on a credit report and remain an idefinite period of time.


Negative credit information remains on a credit report for seven (7) years from the time it is reported. Chapter 7 bankruptcy remains for ten (10) years from the time of discharge or reportage to the credit bureaus. In some cases judgment liens they also expire after 7 years unless/until the lien holder renews the judgment. If a judgment is renewed, most can be, it can be reentered on the judgment debtor's CR and will remain until satisfied or the time once again expires. This is only one example of why judgment liens are so damaging for the judgment debtor.


Probably, in most cases a judgment is entered against the defendant. A judgment will remain on a person's credit report for seven years from the time of entry and if renewable can be reentered on one's CR. The length of time a judgment remains public record depends upon the laws of the state in which the judgment is entered.


Some judgments will be removed according to the seven year time limit some will not. Many judgments are renewable, if that is the case the judgment can stay or be reentered on a CR. The "filed" indicates when the judgment became valid, and that is the date from which the seven year time frame usually begins.


If your creditor has obtained a judgment against you, yes.


Pehaps, but in most cases it would be temporary, as the majority of judgments are renewable and can legally be reentered on a CR. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Judgement will "fall off" of your credit as long as the Plaintiff does not petition the court again. I am speaking first hand here! Y-THINK-Y


An outstanding judgment is a court order that gives a creditor the legal right to collect from a debtor. As court judgments are a matter of public record, a creditor can report the judgment on the debtor's credit reports. An example of a judgment placed on a credit report would be a judgment for eviction. This judgment will remain on the credit report for seven years from the filing date.


The removal of a judgment from a CR does not mean it is not valid and collectible. Judgments are awarded for a 5-20 years duration and most are renewable. In the majority of cases they will remain valid until they are paid in full or a settlement is made. A judgment that is renewed can be reentered on a CR.


Paying the judgment will help, but you will have to wait 7 years for the judgment to fall off your credit. Once the judgment is paid, it will show other landlords that you will fulfill your obligations, regardless of the stain on your credit.


Normally for a judgment to be withdrawn from your credit report, it is supposed to be cleared after 7 years. A judgment remains on a credit report for seven years from the time it is entered. Many judgments are renewable and can therefore be reentered making it possible for them to stay on the public records portion of a CR for an undetermined amount of time. The time limit for a bankruptcy entry to remain on a CR is ten years from the date of discharge or in some instances a dismissal. Valid information that is negative cannot be removed until the time limit has expired. In most cases positive information will become a permanent part of a person's credit history.


Credit reports are national, not from state to state. A judgment will stay on your credit 7-10 years depending on the type of judgment regardless of what state you live in.


Yes, if they get a judgment against you, and most do. Once the judgment has been entered and is public record, that judgment will go on your credit reports and it will tank your credit scores.


Judgments remain in the public recoreds portion of a credit report for 7 years. Most judgments are renewable and can be reentered thereby making it possible for a judgment to remain on the CR for an undetermined amount of time. Until a judgment is paid in full or satisfied, it is valid and enforceable and can impact any future financial transactions. The FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act) Statute of Limitations is 7 years for reporting, even if the Judgment is renewed by the Plaintiff who has the judgment against you, it cannot report after the SOL has run its' course.


If the judgment names only one spouse as the judgment debtor it will not be entered on the non judgment spouse's credit report.



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