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2011-07-12 23:32:29
2011-07-12 23:32:29

Cats can eat Spiders, this will not hurt the cat (but will definitely hurt the spider). Most cats would rather eat their cat food, but there is a certain excitement in catching your own prey, even if it is just a spider.

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Spiders are carnivorous, they eat insects


well cats can eat anything bugs but spiders well my cat ate one numbers of time so it shouldn't hurt but if your not sure ask your local vet.


other spiders and insects


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No. Honey would be too sticky for a jumping spider to contact it and not get in deep trouble. Jumping spiders and some other spiders will drink nectar from flowers, but that is much less highly concentrated and not so sticky.


Mainly other smaller spiders, flying insects, bugs, and even a small meal worm


Yes they can,It will not hurt them.


Most cats are curious and will pick or eat at anything that interests them. Spiders and other little bugs are also easy prey for cats so they get in the habit of easily catching and eating them, it probably even taste good to them..


no because spider can kill the cat


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Well...they eat insects, they have 8 legs, and they hurt when they bite.


Cats, birds, spiders and more


Well my cat likes to eat them, so cats would be on that list. I think birds eat them as well, and spiders kill them


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cats and other animals that eat smaller animals like mice, spiders, frogs, ect.


I would assume cats would eat them. They aren't eaten by widows, they eat widows.


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They seem to live alone, although male jumping spiders will try to attract the attention of females in order to mate; this may include doing a mating dance-- jumping and bobbing and making a noise that sounds like a vibration. But for the most part, even when there are other jumping spiders in the vicinity, they keep to themselves. Jumping spiders have their own webs, live where they think they can find prey, and may even attack (or eat) a fellow jumping spider if that spider is getting in the way.


Spiders usually catch moths and small flies in their webs. But there are Jumping Spiders (in my house) and these guys catch and eat other spiders. So we don't have many spiders. There are also trap door spiders who live in the ground and have their tunnel concealed by a trap door, from which they leap out to catch prey.



Many female spiders eat their counterparts following sexual activity and before eggs are laid to prevent the male from eating his offspring. Other spiders that consume large insects will eat other appropriately sized spiders. Specifically there are species that exclusively consume other spiders as their regular diet such as the Portia jumping spider, which is perhaps the smartest spider.


It eats flies, other spiders, crickets, bees, flies, wasps, moth, and other arthropods.


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