Physics
Chemistry

Can entropy be reversed?

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2010-10-25 23:07:58

You've likely seen this, but:

THERE IS AS YET INSUFFICIENT DATA FOR A MEANINGFUL ANSWER.

We simply don't know enough about the source of energy to know.

Were an absolute insulator (a material that lets absolutely no

energy through), and shaped into a ball, then entropy could

hypothetically be resisted. However, this would not REVERSE

entropy, as no new energy could be brought in without opening the

sphere and letting the contents escape.

What many people don't understand is that there is no actual

true entropy. When energy leaves something, it doesn't cease to

exist, but simply goes to a spot that we can't use it. The

disorganization of all energy, the placing of each particle apart

and out-of-reach, is what commonly thought of entropy actually

is.

With the theory that the (our) universe is closed, and nothing

escapes, the scattered energy could be floating around,

occasionally meeting, and possibly bouncing off the borders of the

universe. EVENTUALLY, which could be in an unimaginable amount of

time (Literally unimaginable. You can conceive of the

inconceivability, but not the actual number.), the particles of

energy and whatnot could eventually meet again in sufficient

numbers to be worth something, hopefully another Big Bang.

With the theory of an open universe, there are two different

(relevant) possibilities. The first is that there are infinitely

more BB's (Big Bangs) all over our plane of existence, that our BB

was not the only one, and that the expanding matter of each can

pass that of other BB's. Should this be the case, there is an

infinite amount of energy in existence, and more of anything can

EVENTUALLY be encountered again.

If, however, we are the only Big Bang, and there is no other

source of anything, we're theoretically screwed. (Not to worry,

though: It's actually more likely that there are more Big Bangs

than that we're all alone.)

Of course, in any of these, there is the possibility that our

Universe's (from our Big Bang) gravity will be enough to catch the

far-flung galaxies and draw them back in for "The Big Crunch", when

everything gets squished into one point again, and hopefully Banged

again.

I believe that the last person to answer this question probably

had some understanding of different universe theories, but didn't

quite get what entropy was.

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In general entropy is the decay of a system from order to chaos.

It can be reversed, locally. However to do so requires work, and

energy, which is obtained by taking a different ordered system and

reducing it further towards chaos. So while I may reverse entropy

in my room (it is cleaner) I've increased the entropy in my body,

in excess of what I've cleaned up.


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