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Answered 2009-07-06 00:58:24

No. The child is well within his/her rights to choose not to see the non-custodial parent. However, the non-custodial parent still contributed to that child being born, and is therefore required to help provide for him/her.

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Yes, if the non-custodial parent has any visitation rights.


The only person that can close a child support case in NYC is the custodial parent. If the custodial parent chooses to close the case, she (or he) needs to petition the family court that opened the case, as well as contact the division of child support enforcement for New York state.


Partitions can be extremely complicated and if you disagree with the petition then you need to hire an attorney to represent you. Otherwise, you can contact the court and consent to the petition for partition. See related question.Partitions can be extremely complicated and if you disagree with the petition then you need to hire an attorney to represent you. Otherwise, you can contact the court and consent to the petition for partition. See related question.Partitions can be extremely complicated and if you disagree with the petition then you need to hire an attorney to represent you. Otherwise, you can contact the court and consent to the petition for partition. See related question.Partitions can be extremely complicated and if you disagree with the petition then you need to hire an attorney to represent you. Otherwise, you can contact the court and consent to the petition for partition. See related question.


You should share your plans with the custodial parents for your child's sake. If there is an emergency, it's best that everyone knows how to make contact.


they only have to inform the custodial parent of the change of address if they still wish to contact the childAnswerIf they want to stay in contact with that person or the child or if you are having to pay a certain amount for the child then yes of course otherwise it is up to your own discretion


A written response is not required unless so stated. However, the non custodial parent should appear before the court on the date noted if they want to give testimony. If the non custodial parent cannot for some good reason appear at that time he or she should contact the clerk of the court and request a new date be set. Non appearance of a non custodial parent generally allows the court to grant all the terms of the child support petition.


Contact your child support office or court that issued the child support order and request a modification of the child support order.


Yes unless there is some legal bar on contact with the non-custodial parent. Also, by that time the court orders may be terminated if the court is notified the child is now eighteen.


yes, the custodial parent needs to contact their case worker and submit a writtem letter stating that they do not wish to collect the back pay. (Illinois)


An action for custody requires going to court and asking for it. Contact your local families and children division of your courthouse to find out what paperwork you need to file prior to a hearing. * Custodial issues are treated the same as would be a civil lawsuit. A petition should be filed in the family court (sometimes probate) in the county where the petitioner resides. State social services do not aid a parent or interested party in obtaining custodial rights that is a private civil matter.


No, the custodial parent must give written a agreement which contains all pertinent information including the date the child/children will leave and the date they will return, how and when the non-custodial parent should stay in contact, and so forth. If a non-custodial parent removes a child/children from ANY place w/o the knowledge and/or permission of the custodial parent they are committing "parental kidnapping" and may be subject to criminal prosecution and other penalties.


Call the police and report it. * The custodial parent has the legal right to refuse visitation to the non custodial parent if it would place the child or children in jeopardy of harm or neglect. DO Not call the police. Contact the attorney who handled the custody case or if that is not possible contact the state's department of family and children's services for assistance.


Petition the civil court of that jurisdiction. Go ahead and contact an attorney- you will probably need one to draw up the petition to the court.


Contact the office of the clerk of the state court in the county in which you wish to file for emancipation.


If a visitation order has been granted by the court, the court would need to have been informed of the address of the non custodial parent and approved of such before the visitation order was granted. There are circumstances under which the court will allow the visiting parent to not disclose his or her address to the custodial parent, but said parent must provide other contact information, (phone numbers, grandparents address, numbers, etc.). If the custodial parent believes allowing the children to participate in visitation when the cited circumstances exist, he or she should petition the court to have the visitation order amended to a suitable arrangement for all parties. The best option is to seek guidance from the attorney who handled the custodial case.


Assuming the biological father has establishes parentage after the birth of the child, he can file a petition for visitation or custodial rights in the appropriate state court in the county where he lives. An unwed mother is presumed by law to have sole custodial rights to a child until a court rules otherwise. Until a court order is issued for the father to be allowed to visit or share custody, the mother does not legally have to allow contact between the father and child nor members of the father's family.


you need to contact sheriff or dhr, the sheriffs office will get it in court fast


Highly unlikely to get any STD without sexual contact.


That depends on whether the non custodial parent has any legal custodial rights and whether those rights are sole or joint. If the non-custodial has sole legal custody, probably. If not, then no, not for a minor child, not without the permission of the parent with sole or joint legal custody. There are different types of custody, physical and legal. Check your custody order before you proceed to get an answer, or contact an attorney.


If the mother has been the custodial parent (which most mothers are), or has been legally designated the custodial parent with a visitation order for the father, the mother can (and should) contact the police. Ask the police to intervene. At the same time, get an attorney to file an emergency petition in family court for custodial interference.If the mother is the party with only visitation rights, under a court order for visitation, you would first need to know your rights and responsibilities under the order. If the father is violating the order, you would need to petition the court for the father disobeying the court order. The father would need to show just cause for not giving the baby to you at the appointed times per the court order. As long as you are doing your part of the order, and have no problems the judge could use to rule against you, the order should be enforced.


The standard age of majority, aka emancipation, is 18. You can petition the court at any age. Contact a lawyer, or if there is abuse, contact the police immediately.



Contact your solicitor (lawyer), and social services and the police (provided you have solid proof).


12 months with no contact whatsoever (including child support payments)


You can visit or contact the probate court where the decedent lived to see if a petition for probate has been filed.



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