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Answered 2016-01-20 03:01:28

speed is a scalar and velocity a vector. Yes, they have equal speeds in the direction of the vector. If you run up a hill at 10 mph the speed and velocity in the direction up hill are the same, but the horizontal speed and vertical speed are different.

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Answered 2016-01-20 01:42:24

Yes. Just have them move in different directions.

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Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.Velocity is a vector; to specify velocity, you indicate a speed (a magnitude), and a direction. If two objects move in different directions, their velocities will be different, even if their speeds are the same.


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