Digital Video Recorders

Can you transfer shows recorded on a DVR to DVD?

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2009-10-28 14:28:34
2009-10-28 14:28:34

Yes, you can do this. You hook up your DVD recorder up directly to the DVR.

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The EverFocus ECOR4 4-CH DVR w/DVD BURNER does that.


No,it only stores the shows in teh DVR memory. anonymous@oola.com


Transfer Recorded Show From DVR to DVD, Most likely not, until you connect the output of the DVR to the input of the DVD. Then with copy protections, you may still not get a recording. Depends on the movie or program you recorded, and whether or not copy prevention signals have been inserted in the original program, or are being placed there by the program provider.


Off of your DVR, if you have one.


You can connect the output of your DVR in a DVD recorder, such as the Samsung DVD-VR375. This will record your DVR programs directly to DVD.


You can play a recorded show from one DVR but you cannot play it on another DVR. A DVR works similar to a computer that is not linked to any other computer or the internet. You may record something on a single DVR and the television it is linked to will save the show you want to watch at the particular time it plays. Then you will be able to go back at a later more convenient time and watch the show as you like. But if you two DVRS' in a house, one upstairs and the other downstairs, you can only play recorded shows on the DVR that you recorded the show on.


You also can record on DVD rw disks and them transfer from the stand alone too computer too take out comercials.I don't know if you can take out comercials on a DVR's.The biggest difference between a DVD with recording capability and a DVR is:A DVR uses a Hard Disk Recorder (HDR) to digitally record movies and television shows from your TV to a hard disk (like the one in your home computer). DVRs record in real-time, which allow you to pause or rewind at any point in the program.A DVD recorder records to discs and not a hard drive like DVR. A disc has limited storage capacity compared to a DVR. It doesn�t have a hard drive or �real-time� recording capability.There are some DVRs that have built in DVD recorders. Some allow you to burn DVDs while you watch and record television shows and movies on your DVR or simply burn saved shows to your DVD to free up space on your DVR. Check with your local electronics store to see which brand would best suit your needs.


If your DVR has a built in DVD player, yes.


With Dish Network, yes. Your user guide will show you how this process works.


Run component cables (red,whit and yellow) from the DVR "video out" (yellow) to the "video in" of the DVD recorder. That will send the picture to the DVD recorder. If your DVR or DVD recorder does not have the yellow video out or in as described, use the "S video" out of the DVR to the "S video" in of the DVD recorder. The red and white jacks are for sound....out of the DVR to the audio in of the DVD recorder.


The Toshiba SD H400 - DVD player / DVR is a good one.


NO Not unless you have a recorder. The laser in a recorder burns the data onto the surface of the DVD. If you wish to transfer a video file from your Digital Video Recorder to a Disc, you must have a burner to do so. You may, however be able to transfer the data from your DVR to your computer using a cable. But not knowing your model, I cannot advise for sure.


There are several DVD recorders that come with DVR capability


Connect the DVR to a DVD-R recorder, via the AV/SCART sockets. Monitor what is going on by connecting the TV to the DVD-R recorder. Playback the show on the DVR and press 'record' on the DVD recorder. The recording is made in real time and is therefore slow, but it works. You can substitute the DVD recorder with a computer, suitably equipped with a Recordable DVD drive and video capture card or dongle.


You need a DVD recorder, or computer with recordable DVD drive and capture device. Use the AV outputs on the DVR and connect to the AV inputs on the DVD recorder. Play the program on the DVR and hit record on the DVD recorder, with a DVD-R or RW in the drive. Record in real time. The recorded disc will have to be 'finalised' before it can be played on any DVD player. See the instructions for the DVD recorder to find out how to 'finalise'. It may be better to use a computer and then apply edits to your completed program, before commiting the disc.


Try to use your Roxio or Nero burning software on your computer to "close" the CD.


Most DVRs can record a maximum of two shows simultaneously, although some can record as many as four.


First you need a tool to connect a hard drive to a USB port, then you just take the hard drive out of the DVR and conect it to the tool and than into the compuuter


No, I do not think so. We have a DVR, and when we record shows onto a VCR tape, the show being taped must be playing. My only suggestion would be to hook the recording device to another TV.


Yes the EverFocus ECOR4 4-CH DVR w/DVD BURNER will also play your DVd videos.


Any DVD/VCR combo with a composite out will work great with your TWC DVR.


This depends on the particular model. Some DVRs have DVD players built in, and some do not. By itself, a standalone DVR (Digital Video Recorder) without a DVD drive built in cannot play a DVD.


You can only record 2 shows at a time on your DVR; but you cannot watch any other shows on different chanels when you do this.


You just might have a selector switch which determines which output the DVR/DVD player has. It could be on the remote control or possibly, a button on the unit.


Again it really depends on how many gigabytes your drive is on your DVR that will determine how many shows the DVR can hold. Usually a 30 gig drive can hold about 30 hours of television, so depending on how big your DVR is will depend on how many shows you can record. Other things to keep in mind are if you are recording shows in HDTV, as these shows tend to take up more space.



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